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Category Archives: Leadership

A Message from CNO and Mrs. Gilday on Military Spouse Appreciation Day

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday and Mrs. Linda Gilday thank all military spouses on Military Spouse Appreciation Day.

Shipmates, my wife, Linda, and I wanted to take a moment to say thanks to all military spouses on Military Spouse Appreciation Day.

Let’s take time together to applaud the service, dedication and support of military spouses, and recognize spouses for the daily sacrifices and challenges they overcome, especially now during the Coronavirus.

For the past 25 years, Linda has been a constant source of strength. Despite moving around the world, she has maintained a successful career in both the public and the private sectors, supported me every step of the way, and she’s been an incredible anchor for our family.

Like countless military families around the world, the love, resourcefulness, and support from spouses make a career of naval service worthwhile.

For all the responsibilities military spouses carry, both seen and unseen, a heartfelt thank you. We could not do it without you. We’ll see you in the fleet!

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/05/08/a-message-from-cno-and-mrs-gilday-on-military-spouse-appreciation-day/ poyrazdogany

CNO Message to the Force: We must be protectors and exemplify our values

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday

Mission one for every Sailor — active and reserve, uniformed and civilian — is the operational readiness of today’s Navy. That means being ready both in our personal and professional lives — and part of that readiness is continuing to hold ourselves to high ideals of integrity and service.

Reflecting on my first three months as chief of naval operations, I want each and every Sailor to think about who we are as a Navy and the constitutional oath we commit ourselves to. That oath is what binds us together. It is the foundation of our profession. It is our north star. It defines us.

It is no overstatement to say that naval service requires deeper and broader knowledge than it ever has before. You must summon all your energy to ensure that we are ready to fight today; not tomorrow, not in some distant future but today. That all starts with good order and discipline at every level of the chain of command. 

To be clear, we must be men and women of integrity. We must be honorable. We must be standard-bearers. We must be above reproach. And we must not give anyone cause to question our fundamental values. That is what sets us apart as a fighting force. 

Leaders, I am counting on you. I expect commanders at every level to epitomize integrity and exemplify our core values at all times. Senior enlisted leaders, I expect you to anchor up and show your Sailors what right looks like on the deck-plates, day-in and day-out. And I expect every Sailor to display the character and honor that has always defined our Navy. These ideals are central to who we are.

The responsibility for ethical and professional behavior must be taken seriously — and we must own it at every level. We must be protectors and exemplify our values.

I’m counting on each of you to set a strong personal example of responsible behavior, both on and off duty.

While there is much work to be done, the tenacity and ingenuity of our Sailors will take us where we need to go — and do so at a flank bell. 

See you in the fleet.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/12/02/cno-message-to-the-force-we-must-be-protectors-and-exemplify-our-values/ poyrazdogany

Time to Update Our Strategic Vision and Goals

By Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer

After two years serving as your Secretary of the Navy, it is time to update the department’s vision and goals. We’ve accomplished a lot together, and we need to keep looking forward.

The return of great power competition is testing our readiness and capabilities in ways we haven’t seen in a generation. We have to be ready to fight tonight in every part of the world, and in every domain, as one integrated naval force.

The department’s new vision gets to the heart of this. The credible and immediate presence of the Navy and Marine Corps within all operational domains ensures the security and prosperity of the American people and preserves open access to the global commons. The expeditionary character of our Sailors and Marines is an indispensable component of the Joint Force. As such, we can expect America’s adversaries to continue to erode our maritime advantage through every means at their disposal.

With this challenge in mind, we must make every effort to retain and expand our competitive edge. We have to embrace a more integrated naval approach to developing our people, capabilities and processes.

We’ve already made significant strides in integration through many of our functional elements, and we’ll continue to do so, innovating where we can and adapting where we must. I see innovation and adaptation as complementary strengths. Adaptation adjusts to the security environment, while innovation transforms it. To succeed in today’s complex world, we must do both.

That’s why I’ve tasked the department with six strategic goals:  

1.      Invest in Human Capital

Instead of assuming we will attract the right talent, our soon-to-be released Human Capital Strategy will meet the market where it is. We’re looking to access the best people by employing the private sector’s best practices and technology in recruitment. We’ll augment our traditional workforce with outside experts, temporary employees, and crowd-based solutions. And we’ll curate our workforce, engaging our people so they understand their opportunities and have the flexibility and training to build a career that works.

 2.      Prioritize Learning as a Strategic Advantage

Innovation and intellectual readiness have become the new battlefields of what we describe in the Education for Seapower initiative as the “cognitive age.” We must be a continual learning enterprise, for one simple reason: Our adversaries are learning too. The era of great power competition will be driven by investments in gray matter as much as gray hulls. To ensure our future competitive strength, I’ve appointed a Chief Learning Officer, Mr. John Kroger, and charged him with synchronizing the efforts of our higher learning institutions, exploring new avenues for education and training, and expanding opportunities for our researchers, officers and civilians to learn from the private sector and academia.

 3.      Develop a Fully Integrated Process for Our Budget Priorities

We’re redesigning the budget process to meet all of our needs as a single force, Navy and Marine Corps, establishing priorities that make sense across both services. That means reforming our processes to ensure documents like the Program Objective Memorandum, or POM, reflect the true immediate and projected needs of the department, and that we maintain visibility of our risks, requirements and strategic decision points throughout the year.

 4.      Modernize Business Operations

As I mentioned at the top, we must be one integrated naval force, and that applies as much to our business operations layer as much as it does at the warfighting level. Through aggressive implementation of the Business Operations Plan, we’re building on the results of our department-wide audit to streamline and integrate our supply chain, financial and logistics operations. We’re getting into our “systems of systems” to ensure both the relevance and integrity of our data. And we’re using the best practices of the private sector to reduce downtime and return capabilities to the fight quickly and effectively.

 5.      Elevate Information Management

Good information management is a strategic imperative. This means we must unify our digital enterprise to deliver secure, reliable and resilient warfighting capabilities across the services and the information spectrum. Our integrated effort will be led by a fully empowered and mission-oriented Chief Information Officer. I have named Mr. Aaron Weis to this role, and charged him with addressing the critical vulnerabilities the cyber security review identified up and down the supply chain, and responsible for every aspect of our digital transformation.

 6.      Design an Integrated Naval Force Structure

We’re modernizing our naval force, as well as our supporting infrastructure, to maximize interoperability and warfighting capability with our partner nations. That includes developing an Industrial Base Management Plan proposal for a modernized naval force and supporting infrastructure capable of global projection. It means getting ahead of global trends, and ensuring interoperability with partner nations and lethal overmatch for our warfighters. That also means providing both the capability and capacity we need to confront our many challenges. A 355-ship Navy is an important aspirational goal, but more important is ensuring we have the maximum capability to address every challenge under existing resource constraints.

The return of great power competition leaves no room for complacency and no time for inefficiency. Together, we must out pace, out think, and out innovate all who threaten the American people and challenge our global interests. Together we will do just that.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/11/07/time-to-update-our-strategic-vision-and-goals/ poyrazdogany

The Navy Picked You for a Reason

By Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday

Today, around the Navy and around the world, men and women—Sailors—are making an incredible transition and advancing to Chief Petty Officer. The Navy Memorial is one of our most sacred places, here in Washington, D.C., and today I will stand with a group of Sailors who will receive their anchors. I can’t think of a more fitting place to celebrate such a transformational day.

Over the past six weeks, many Sailors have been challenged, and those challenges were hard but nothing compared to what they will face in the years to come. And that’s ok, because challenge is good. Challenges strengthen us. As I reflect on the critical impact Chiefs have had on my life and career, I am convinced of the importance of the Mess as an institution.

My first Chief told me that our most important weapons system is our Navy Team and their families. People are and will continue to be our key competitive advantage over any adversary. The fact that I am highlighting this enduring principle, 34 years after I first heard it from my Chief, reflects how pivotal Chief Petty Officers have been in my own life and career.

Every time I get the opportunity to reconnect with a group of Chiefs, I leave feeling uplifted and inspired. Those brief times reinforce how important the institution of the Chief Petty Officers’ Mess is to our Navy and our nation.

I use that word institution carefully. When we use it, we often do so to indicate something that has merely been around for a long time. That’s not what I mean today. That usage of the word indicates staleness and complacency, the exact opposite of what the Chiefs’ Mess represents. The original meaning is far better. The word “institution” is the “action of establishing or founding” and under this definition, the institution of the Chiefs’ Mess is not who you are, or the insignia you wear, or the fact that we’ve marked this occasion for many years, but what you do, the actions you take, day-in, and day-out, large and small—that Chiefs routinely undertake to enable our Sailors to perform at their very best.

Even the briefest review of history demonstrates that Chief Petty Officers are Sailors of action. Some of their names, like John Finn, or Oscar Peterson or Peter Tomich—all Chiefs who were awarded the Medal of Honor—are legends in their own right. These examples of valor and of sacrifice are worthy of telling and retelling, but there is something even greater than these individual examples. Our Navy’s achievements throughout our history are due in large measure to the training and mentorship provided by Chief Petty Officers.

Later this year, we’ll commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Leyte Gulf. The line of heroes we look to for inspiration from that series of combat actions is long as well. We will remember Cmdr. Ernest Evans and Lt. Cmdr. Robert Copeland and Gunner’s Mate Third Class Paul Carr. A Chief isn’t in that list, but the Sailors and Officers we lionize from that battle were all trained and mentored by Chief Petty Officers. Those Chiefs would probably tell you that they weren’t looking for credit. They weren’t looking to get their name mentioned by the CNO 75 years later. They were focused on the actions they needed to take to establish the Chiefs’ Mess, to institute the Chiefs’ Mess—every day. They were focused on making our Navy team the most lethal weapons system in our arsenal and they were focused on creating winners – the Sailors and Officers whose actions would cement the U.S. Navy’s combat record and show that our destroyers can fight like battleships as they did at Leyte Gulf.

I sent a letter to all of the Chiefs who just donned their anchors, and I’ve charged them and those who already wear anchors to think about the Chiefs’ Mess as an institution: the sum of the daily acts, both small and large, that continue to challenge us and force us to rise to the standards of those who came before. The actions that will leave our Navy in a better position tomorrow. I also told them that this can’t happen from the physical space of the Mess. They have to be constantly involved in their Sailors’ lives on and off duty.

Chiefs, carrying forward the legacy of those who came before you will test you, and will draw on all the skills, knowledge, and experiences that formed the basis for your selection. The demands you face are tall indeed, and I have high expectations of our Chief Petty Officers, as do the Sailors you serve and lead. However, I am confident that you’ll rise to meet these obligations, making the most of each and every day, leading Sailors and Officers to fulfill the promise of their potential. The challenges we face as a Navy and a nation demand that you do so, as do those who wore anchors before you. We need your best efforts more than ever. I want every Chief in the fleet, new and old, to remember that the Navy not only expects more of you, but demands it—now more than ever. To those of you donning your anchors today, congratulations. You are now the Chief! Thank you for all that you do, and I’ll see you out in the fleet.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/09/18/the-navy-picked-you-for-a-reason/ poyrazdogany

CNO Gilday’s Message to the Fleet

Adm. Mike Gilday
Chief of Naval Operations

I am humbled and honored to be your Chief of Naval Operations. Together, we are part of the greatest navy in the world. Everyone on our team – officers and enlisted Sailors, active and reserve, uniformed and civilian – plays an important part in making sure we not only remain the greatest navy in the world, but that we get even better.

For the first time in a very long time, we face serious challenges at sea around the world. For decades, we took for granted that no other blue-water navy would dare take us on. That’s no longer true.

The U.S. Navy has been and will continue to be a global force for security and stability. But there are other nations who would use their maritime forces to threaten the freedom of the seas to intimidate their neighbors or to coerce others in violation of international law. Those maritime forces are growing in numbers and in strength. Still others know they cannot take us on at sea but will try to attack our Navy in areas like cyber.

Rapidly modernizing our Navy and keeping pace with technology will remain a priority for us.  But I still believe what my first chief told me, that people are our most important weapons system. A well trained force is our competitive advantage. I look forward to hearing from leaders at every level at how we can continue to make improvements for Sailors and their families.

And I have a great sense of urgency to get after solutions to the challenges we face.

In the coming weeks, my FIRST priority will be visiting with many of you. I will work with our leaders in the fleets, with our Marine Corps teammates and with our other joint service and international partners as we develop our way ahead to meet these challenges.

We will question our assumptions. We will think differently about the competition we are now in. We will be the Navy the nation needs now, and we will build the Navy the nation needs to fight and win in the future.

What remain constant are our core values of honor, courage and commitment. We will remain true to our core attributes of integrity, accountability, initiative and toughness. We will remain the premier Navy in the world, and I know we will be even better tomorrow than we are today.

Thank you for all you do for our Navy and for each other. I’ll see you out in the fleet.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/08/23/cno-gildays-message-to-the-fleet/ U.S. Navy

CNO Gilday’s Message to the Fleet

Adm. Mike Gilday
Chief of Naval Operations

I am humbled and honored to be your Chief of Naval Operations. Together, we are part of the greatest navy in the world. Everyone on our team – officers and enlisted Sailors, active and reserve, uniformed and civilian – plays an important part in making sure we not only remain the greatest navy in the world, but that we get even better.

For the first time in a very long time, we face serious challenges at sea around the world. For decades, we took for granted that no other blue-water navy would dare take us on. That’s no longer true.

The U.S. Navy has been and will continue to be a global force for security and stability. But there are other nations who would use their maritime forces to threaten the freedom of the seas to intimidate their neighbors or to coerce others in violation of international law. Those maritime forces are growing in numbers and in strength. Still others know they cannot take us on at sea but will try to attack our Navy in areas like cyber.

Rapidly modernizing our Navy and keeping pace with technology will remain a priority for us.  But I still believe what my first chief told me, that people are our most important weapons system. A well trained force is our competitive advantage. I look forward to hearing from leaders at every level at how we can continue to make improvements for Sailors and their families.

And I have a great sense of urgency to get after solutions to the challenges we face.

In the coming weeks, my FIRST priority will be visiting with many of you. I will work with our leaders in the fleets, with our Marine Corps teammates and with our other joint service and international partners as we develop our way ahead to meet these challenges.

We will question our assumptions. We will think differently about the competition we are now in. We will be the Navy the nation needs now, and we will build the Navy the nation needs to fight and win in the future.

What remain constant are our core values of honor, courage and commitment. We will remain true to our core attributes of integrity, accountability, initiative and toughness. We will remain the premier Navy in the world, and I know we will be even better tomorrow than we are today.

Thank you for all you do for our Navy and for each other. I’ll see you out in the fleet.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/08/23/cno-gildays-message-to-the-fleet/ U.S. Navy

Congratulations, CPO Selects; Now Earn This

Congratulations to all those selected for advancement to Chief Petty Officer. This is our most important milestone achievement in enlisted advancement, and you should be incredibly proud of all you have accomplished.

Chief Petty Officer Selection Results

The Navy you have grown up in will look very different to you six weeks from now — what you’ve done to demonstrate your readiness for this responsibility will be different from how you apply your skills as a member of the Chief’s Mess. Take some time to reflect on all who have had a hand in raising you to be the outstanding leaders you have become — everyone who has ever advocated for you, empowered you, trained, taught or developed you put you in this position, at the precipice of a new way of life. In moments of difficulty, someone put an arm around your shoulder and reinforced your confidence; in moments of sadness, someone consoled you; in moments of great achievement, someone celebrated with you, because no one succeeds alone – you led your team to victory. The investment in you is almost immeasurable, as it is too great to be captured in terms of dollars and cents or a simple quantification of time. Recognizing that is important, because it highlights your sacred duty to learn how the Chief’s Mess operates, how we transcend the sum of our parts to make the Navy better as a whole — to network and share, and to build winning teams so that we prevail in combat.

Over the next several weeks you will be elated, and you will be saddened and frustrated — you will experience the immense joy of success, and the desolate pain of failure.  All of these will build you, will make you stronger, and are required of our cadre of senior technical experts who make the Navy run. Chief Petty Officer Initiation is a refined syllabus of comprehensive and thoughtful events, constructed and woven together to carefully transform our top performing First Class Petty Officers into basically-trained Chief Petty Officers. You will learn to better and more thoroughly evaluate problems, make difficult decisions more easily, share difficult news and speak truth to power more readily and, most importantly, build teams ready to fight and win in combat. 

Laying the Keel 2.0

This is not the beginning of the end; it is the end of the beginning.  You will learn and grow — as you already have — for the remainder of your time in the Navy. Including my own, this is my 21st CPO Initiation, and I still learn something every day. You are not in this alone; the roughly 36,000 active duty and reserve Chief Petty Officers, supported by nearly 500,000 living veterans of the Navy who are also duly initiated members of the Mess, are all emotionally invested in bringing you into the Mess the right way. We will set the bar for you and clearly delineate the high standards required for you as a member of the Mess. I am confident that you will rise to the occasion and demonstrate to the Chiefs that you are ready, and on that day I look forward to clasping your hand and welcoming you as a brother or sister in arms.  

My charge to you is that you go into this training “all-in.” The debt you are about to incur to the Chiefs who will finish your initial training, along with all of those mentioned above that contributed to your success, is a debt that can never be repaid. You must seize this new and exciting opportunity to lead — and forever strive to “earn this.”   

Congratulations!

– MCPON Russell Smith

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/08/01/congratulations-cpo-selects-now-earn-this/ U.S. Navy

5 Tips to Develop a Solid Leadership Foundation

By Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Stacey L. Zimmerman, Master-at-Arms 1st Class Jacob A. Widener, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Ann C. Jones and Yeoman 1st Class Paige S. Bosco. 

 

Through Laying the Keel — like the solid backbone of a ship — the Navy seeks to empower future Navy leaders to build a lasting framework for leadership development. To that end, the recent SAILOR 360 inspired Naval Support Activity Mid-South 2019 Leadership Symposium leveraged various experiences, backgrounds, leadership styles and perspectives to help build and strengthen the leadership foundations of those who attended. The two day symposium, hosted by the First Class Petty Officer Association, featured motivating and insightful presentations from various speakers on the first day, and battle stations type events designed to get Sailors to work together to overcome challenges on the second day — promoting trust and teamwork.

From the symposium, here are the top five takeaways to help you develop a solid leadership foundation:

  1. Humility

Remember where you came from. Many times, we forget where we started and it’s important to realize at one point in your career you were a junior Sailor. Learn to practice “Followership.” You need to not only practice it, but also teach it to others. You can’t lead if you don’t know how to follow. Share yourself and your experiences. We are all human and we all make mistakes. Sometimes you will not have all the answers, but someone else might and it’s OK to ask for help. It’s how we learn and it’s a two-way street. As much as you learn from your leaders, your leaders will learn from you.

Seaman Caleb Geffeney poses for a photo in the well deck of the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryre Arciaga/Released)

 

  1. Focus on Team-Building

The biggest thing everyone always talks about: communication. Learn to talk to each other. Don’t be afraid to pick up the phone or look someone in the eye to have an actual conversation. Email and electronic devices have made communication faster, but not necessarily better. We need to talk to each other. If someone is speaking, don’t just pay attention, actively listen to what they are trying to tell you and be receptive to suggestions. Be honest with each other. One of the hardest things you can do is to be honest with your team and peers. Your viewpoint has value; don’t be afraid to express it. It will help build trust within your team.

Camaraderie is real. It’s not about the “I”; it’s about the “WE.” The title or position doesn’t matter; it is about the impact of what you’re doing. Remember that everyone plays a role in the bigger picture.

  1. Diversify Your Perspectives

We all come from different walks of life; we are different people coming from different places, and we have different values. Take advantage of those views and respect them. A different set of eyes on an issue can provide an enormous amount of clarity. Use it and learn from it.

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (March 22, 2019) Sailors applaud after an award was announced at an all hands call on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Steven Edgar/Released)

Challenge yourself and pull yourself out of your comfort zone. You will never grow as a leader if you don’t get comfortable with being uncomfortable. Use every situation as a way to learn and develop yourself. It will help you learn your weak spots. If you want to develop Sailors, you need to develop yourself as well.

  1. Adapt and Overcome

It’s really hard to learn to let go of control. You can’t do everything or control every outcome. Even though the way something was done might not be how you would have done it, you need to realize that if the goal is met and the task is complete, it’s complete.

Sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Grimley (DDG 101) practice firefighting skills and techniques by battling a simulated fire at the Bremerton International Emergency Services Training Center (BIESTC). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Wyatt L. Anthony/Released)

 

Change is rough. No one likes change. But, you can’t stop it. You have to learn to evolve and embrace change. You may not always agree with the change, but don’t reject it because you don’t understand it. Be patient and pause. Take a moment and take a breath. You will not always have all the pieces to the big picture.

Not everything is under your control. Be flexible. Sometimes, things have to play out. Never lower your standards, but learn to adjust your expectations.

  1. Never Give Up

Face it, as a leader you’re not going to get everything right all the time. At some point or another, you will make a mistake and it might feel like the end of the world; it’s not. Good leaders are leaders who take obstacles and turn them into learning experiences. Your keel, the backbone of your foundation as a leader, is constantly evolving. If it’s not working right, and the structure just isn’t what it should be, don’t be afraid to rebuild it.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/06/17/5-tips-to-develop-a-solid-leadership-foundation/ poyrazdogany

CNO and MCPON Release Updates to Leadership Guidance

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) John Richardson and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Russell Smith released May 7 their updated leadership guidance documents, Navy Leader Development Framework Version (NLDF) 3.0 and Laying the Keel. The documents have been refreshed with new ideas in support of developing leaders who can sustainably win and bring their teams to a community centered on “best ever” performance.

Check out the video below for a message from CNO and MCPON on what to expect when you read the two new documents. Learn from these documents and connect with your teams on what being a leader means to you and to our Navy.

 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/05/07/cno-and-mcpon-release-updates-to-leadership-guidance/ U.S. Navy

Ethics is a Strategic Imperative for All Hands

By Adm. Bill Moran
Vice Chief of Naval Operations

Historically ethics has often been seen as a legalistic, zero sum determination of compliance with rules and minimum standards. We can — and we must — do better. Working together, we can view ethics for what it truly is: A strategic imperative for all of us, one that shifts our individual and organizational mind-sets from merely doing the thing right (i.e., process compliance) to always doing the right thing (i.e., the alignment of process, purpose, and values).

Fostering a culture that recognizes ethics as a strategic imperative for all hands will require three immediate actions from the team.

1. Officers: Empower down and learn daily from your team.

U.S. Navy Capt. Murz Morris, commodore of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 21, speaks to Sailors during an all-hands call aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) in the Indian Ocean, Dec. 6, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Logan C. Kellums/Released)

Most problems are best solved in the work spaces of your respective commands rather than here in Washington, D.C. Believe in your Sailors’ ingenuity, intellect and courage to innovate. Working closely at every step with your Chiefs Mess, you must earn, protect, and reciprocate your Sailors’ trust and confidence by making the deck plates our laboratory for new ideas and creative solutions.

Encourage your people to take smart, calculated, and measured risks to raise standards of performance and professionalism. Sailors want you to value their input and be open to positive feedback. Be comfortable with respectful and constructive confrontation, trust your teams, and mission accomplishment will follow.

2. Chiefs and Lead Petty Officers: Promote a culture of open communication and continual feedback.

Rear Adm. Edward Cashman speaks to the Chiefs’ Mess aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Gravely (DDG 107), Jan. 3.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Mark Andrew Hays/Released)

Constructive and respectful criticism is a hallmark of naval service. Sailors feel comfortable providing their honest feedback when they are confident that their voice will be heard.

As deck plate leaders and front line supervisors, you know your Sailors best; listen and learn, teach and develop, and recognize and reward your Sailors every single day. Actively invest in their personal and professional development, know them as people (not just Sailors), and enable their success.

3. Junior Sailors: Identify problems, propose solutions and take ownership.

You are smarter, more adaptable, and more innovative than any other generation of Sailors. Focus your immense talents on finding ways to improve your work centers, departments, commands, and our Navy.

Sailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) hold lines steady during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by ENS Sijing Y. Qiu/Released)

Do not fear failure; trust and collaborate creatively with your chain of command to improve, yet humbly recognize that our Navy is one team that must work together to achieve success. Anchored by your honesty and integrity, raise your own standards, so as to raise those of your command and of our entire Navy team.

Transforming ethics into a strategic asset is another step in the continued vitality of our people, our institution, and our purpose. Competing with character by overlaying ethics as a strategic imperative in everything we do will enhance readiness and result in a more lethal force that reflects the American values you protect every single day.

I am excited about the future of our Navy, and proud to serve with you as we confront the uncertainty of tomorrow together. See you in the Fleet!

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/05/02/ethics-is-a-strategic-imperative-for-all-hands/ U.S. Navy