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Month of the Military Child

Linda Gilday Shares Her Thoughts on the Resilience and Strength of Military Children

By Mrs. Linda Gilday, Wife of Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday


April is Month of the Military Child, and on behalf of my husband Mike, I want to take this opportunity to thank, recognize, and celebrate our military children.

As a mother of two boys, young men now, I understand the challenges and rewards that come with raising children in a Navy household.

Military children face something that other children don’t — deployments, moves, and absences. These experiences force children to become familiar with uncertainty and change. And isn’t that a great skill to carry over into our lives now, as we adjust to different patterns due to the coronavirus?

Today, the need for resilience is more important than ever. To our Navy children, thank you from the bottom of our hearts for doing your part — for the moving, being the new kid in school from time to time, and adapting to the new family routines when your parent is at work or deployed.

Military children, both youth and teenagers, are strong and they set examples for their friends, their neighbors, and their local communities on how to make personal sacrifices in the service of the collective good.

Let’s take time together to celebrate the patriotism, strength, and perseverance of our military children. Let’s applaud their daily sacrifices and the challenges they overcome. Most of all, let’s thank them for their love and support, which makes the life of service to the Navy possible.

We also want to recognize not only the parents who raise the children, but also the Navy child- and healthcare professionals. What you do matters to support Navy children.

To everyone, please join me in recognizing our Navy children and their families, not only this month but all throughout the year.

Thank you very much.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/04/29/month-of-the-military-child/ U.S. Navy

Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Is an Ongoing Effort

By MyNavy HR Fleet Master Chief Wes Koshoffer


Shipmates, Fleet Master Chief Koshoffer from MyNavy HR here to talk about Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month.  COVID-19 mitigation efforts have really changed the way we are doing business in many areas of our Navy but there are some things that we must continue to work on, regardless of the scenario we are facing.  Preventing sexual harassment and sexual assault is one of those areas where we can never take our eye off the ball. 
 
Last year during Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month, we renewed our commitment to prevent sexual violence. This year, we will build on that pledge with some actionable steps: Respect. Protect. Empower. We must, at all times, commit to treating others with respect. Protecting one another from harm and empowering those around us to speak up and step in.
 
We all play a significant role in prevention! We have a great team of coordinators, advocates, and support personnel doing amazing work but the responsibility to protect our Shipmates is shared by every one of us. 
 
Every member of our team must set the tone, lead by example, and consistently engage in behavior that fosters dignity and respect. We must hold ourselves accountable to the highest possible standards of conduct, and we must create an inclusive team that is focused on building a stronger, more resilient, and more powerful Navy.
 
While April presents an opportunity to highlight the SAPR Program, eradicating sexual assault from our ranks can only be accomplished when all hands are engaged in creating a positive, professional environment that is built on trust.
 
Although we will not be able to conduct the same types of “events” that we normally would – we can still spend some time looking at the culture that we are creating in our workplace and we can certainly re-dedicate ourselves to the prevention of sexual assault in our Navy!
 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/04/27/sexual-assault-awareness-and-prevention-is-an-ongoing-effort/ U.S. Navy

Acting Secretary of the Navy Letter to The New York Times

By Thomas B. Modly

I have the utmost respect for Mr. Roosevelt and his family’s immense heritage of service to the nation.  In the case of Captain Crozier, however, he is wrong.  I suspect he has no other motive than to defend a courageous man, a man in the arena, but he simply does not have access to the relevant facts that led to the captain’s dismissal.
 
Capt. Crozier’s emotional letter on official Navy letterhead, addressed to no one in particular, was attached to an email which he distributed broadly to multiple addressees. It began “My Fellow Naval Aviators.”  It included, and intentionally excluded, various people from his direct chain of command. 
 
In the body of the email to which his letter was attached Captain Crozier wrote, “I fully realize that I bear responsibility for not demanding more decisive action the moment we pulled in (to Guam), but right now my only priority is the continued well-being of the crew and embarked staff.”  While this may have been his self-assessment, I know that no one in his chain of command, up to and including me, who felt that Captain Crozier bore any responsibility for not demanding more decisive action at that time. 
 
The facts are that Capt. Crozier’s direct chain of command, up to the Commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, had been communication with him well before (and after) he sent the email. So had my office.  I asked my Chief of Staff to call him just after the ship pulled into Guam.  He did so twice, and Capt. Crozier expressed no alarm to him at all.   Bottom line, the public disclosure of Capt. Crozier’s letter had no impact on the flow of support to the ship.  None.  The crew of the ship was already being tested as rapidly as possible, isolated as necessary, and moved off the ship to quarantine.  That was all happening to the greatest extent possible while still providing for the safety of the ship and all those still aboard.  
 
Capt. Crozier did tell us that he was impatient with the pace of moving Sailors off the ship.  We were ALL impatient with the pace.  Securing 4,000 individual rooms suitable for isolation on Guam in the middle of a pandemic-forced shutdown is not a simple task.  That being said, in less than a week, thanks in large part to the Government of Guam and the support of the rest of the Pacific Fleet, we have secured nearly 3,700.  That plan was in action well prior to Capt. Crozier writing his letter, and it continues to be executed today. 
 
What the public release of his letter did do, however, was unnecessarily create a public panic, when what was called for was calm.  In my view, this is one of the main areas where Captain Crozier “bears responsibility.”  It was his lapse of judgment in a moment of adversity that led to my loss of confidence in him.    
 
I don’t doubt Captain Crozier’s love for his crew.  But in my view, he did serious harm to his Sailors and the rest of our Navy when he created an atmosphere of crisis, while it was his primary duty to be a steady hand on a stormy sea.  He did not send his dire warning on classified networks, or place any markings to suggest the information was classified, sensitive, or for official use only.  While this may sound mundane to the average citizen, it is unacceptable behavior for the commanding officer of a nuclear powered aircraft carrier, and it should never be tolerated.  As a civilian leader responsible to the American public for their safety and security, as well as that of every Sailor and Marine serving and standing the watch, I will not.
 
Sensitive information about the material condition of our biggest and most powerful warship made its way out into the public arena, in the hands of our adversaries.  So did statements about political decisions outside the purview of the military.  It was my determination that the Navy could not afford to wait to see if this lapse of judgement was just an aberration, or even the Captain’s new normal in the midst of a challenge.  The stakes of our national security are simply much too high for that.
 
After all, Mr. Roosevelt, Captain Crozier was the Commanding Officer of the USS Theodore Roosevelt, and I am relatively certain your great grandfather would have demanded much more under pressure.  I certainly do, and we all must.


The New York Times (April 3, 2020) Opinion: Captain Crozier Is a Hero
Letter to The New York Times (April 6, 2020): Captain Crozier: Navy Hero, or Unsteady Leader?

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/04/06/acting-secretary-of-the-navy-letter-to-the-new-york-times/ U.S. Navy

#NavyWomenMakingHistory – A Message from CNO and Mrs. Gilday

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday and Mrs. Linda Gilday

It’s a busy time with the Coronavirus and stressful as well, but my wife, Linda, and I want to take this opportunity to recognize the countless women who serve in the U.S. Navy – active and reserve, uniform and civilian – as well as those who serve as military spouses on the front lines at home.

These are challenging times right now for all of us, but there is no doubt that women have, and will continue to make history in exciting ways. As March comes to an end, we want to recognize Women’s History Month as well as the amazing work being done by so many. Each of us is making history in some small way right now.

The Navy is full of trailblazers who paved a way for the more than 67,000 women who serve as part of our active force today. These spouses, mothers, daughters, sisters, and coworkers serve in every rank – from seaman to admiral… and in most every job – from naval aviators to deep-sea divers. Right now there are female doctors, nurses, and corpsmen deployed aboard the USNS Mercy and Comfort as part of the Navy’s broader response to the coronavirus epidemic. There are also many women who are acting at home as nurses to their own families.

Thousands of women also serve our Navy team as military spouses, supportive family members, government civilians and reservists. We know the sacrifices you are making and what you bring to the Navy team. While some receive public recognition, many do not. And we encourage ALL Navy leaders to take note of these accomplishments!

To the women who forged ahead and broke through that glass ceiling – thank you.  And to the women who serve selflessly with little fanfare day-in and day-out – we appreciate all that you do.

We all have important roles to play in service to the Navy, and to our Nation. Your work matters – whether it’s at home, in an office or aboard ships at sea… It matters, and we thank you. We also would love to see your amazing stories right now – so join our conversation at: #NavyWomenMakingHistory.
 
We will see you out in the Fleet!
 



 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/03/31/navywomenmakinghistory-a-message-from-cno-and-mrs-gilday/ U.S. Navy

Election Season Do’s and Don’ts

A guide for Sailors and Navy civil servants

With presidential and congressional elections approaching, the Navy encourages every one of us to exercise our right to vote.

Just as important is the right to free speech. But we also have the right to be free from political pressure while we’re at work. That means being mindful of laws that prevent us from using our position to advance a political view.

Boatswain’€™s Mate 3rd Class Jason Smith reviews the voting registration guidelines for North Carolina as he registers to vote while underway aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft Carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Torrey W. Lee/Released)

First, how much do you know about what you can and can’t do while on duty, in uniform or in the federal workplace?

Test your knowledge below–and then take a look at some great resources to help you stay on the right side of the law.

Quiz: True or False?

(Scroll down for the answers.)

1. I can wear my uniform at a political rally as long as it’s my Type IIs and my unit patch is removed.

2. It’s OK to volunteer for a campaign on your own time for things like phone banking, posting signs or asking for donations.

3. As long as I’m on my lunch break, I can “like” a political message on Facebook or retweet a candidate while I’m still on the installation.

4. It’s OK to have a poster of Presidents Teddy Roosevelt or John F. Kennedy on my wall since I served on both of the carriers named after them.

5. A campaign bumper sticker on your car or truck is permitted even while parked on a federal property.

6. I can bring to work a shirt with the logo #RESIST or Make America Great Again, as long as I don’t actually wear it.

7. A private conversation about a political issue is OK, even at work.

Who’s Included

Sailors, like other military service members, are bound by DoD Directive 1344.10, “Political Activities by Members of the Armed Forces.” This document outlines the specific types of political participation that military service members may take part in.

All federal civilians are bound by the Hatch Act of 1939. The U.S. Office of Special Counsel, which enforces the Hatch Act, offers answers to frequently asked questions about what’s allowed and what’s prohibited.

Some federal employees at certain agencies are subject to additional restrictions. For more information, visit the OSC’s Hatch Act information page. A quick summary is below.

A graphic that explains the difference between restricted and less restricted employees.
U.S. Navy graphic by Austin Rooney/Released

Sharing on Social Media

Graphic of social media icons

Social media can be particularly tricky. The OSC offers this printable PDF chart for what you can and can’t do on social.

All federal employees may not:

– Use a social media account in your official capacity to engage in political activity at any time (but including your official title/position on a social media profile is allowed).

– Tweet, retweet, share, or like a post or content that solicits political contributions at any time

– Like or follow the social media page of a candidate for partisan office or partisan group while on duty or in the workplace

– Engage in political activity via social media while on duty or in the workplace, or using government-owned equipment

In addition, further restricted employees may not:

– Link to or post the material of a partisan group or candidate for partisan office at any time

– Share or retweet the social media pages or posts of a partisan group or candidate for partisan office at any time

Quiz ANSWERS

1. False. You cannot wear any part of your uniform at a political function.

2. Mostly false. You can volunteer but can’t ask for donations.

3. False. Liking or retweeting while on federal property is not allowed, even from your personal phone while on your lunch break.

4. True. Since neither past president is a current candidate for office, you can display those items as allowed by your command or installation.

5. True. A normal-sized bumper sticker is permitted, even if you park your car on federal property.

6. False. The Office of Special Counsel has said that both slogans are political statements and so neither one is permitted in the federal workplace.

7. It depends. You still can’t advocate for or against a political candidate, but a friendly, private discussion of current events is allowed so long as the other person is a willing participant.

More Information

Read about real-world examples from the U.S. /Office of Special Counsel.
Read OSC advisory opinions on different aspects of the Hatch Act.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/03/06/election-season-dos-and-donts/ U.S. Navy

Chaplain Corps Provides Irreplaceable Services

RADM Brent W. Scott Navy Chief of Chaplains

I recently read an opinion article that suggested it would be reasonable to consider what amounts to reducing the religious liberty of service members and their families. The author offered that diminishing the Chaplain Corps would help the Navy meet its $40 billion requirement. The truth is, however, that it would only provide less than one-half of one percent in governmental saving and it would ultimately cost taxpayers more. Stated differently, chaplains reduce the frequency and severity of a wide range of costly destructive behaviors.

The Navy Chaplain Corps is an extremely efficient organization. The Navy’s 840 chaplains care for more than 564,000 active component service members in the Navy, the Coast Guard, and the Marine Corps. On average, every chaplain cares for more than 670 service members, not counting their family members and the civilians who are also authorized to use their services. The idea that Professional Naval Chaplaincy is a fertile ground for finding cost savings is completely spurious.

Some of the most valuable and far-reaching contributions of the Chaplain Corps go largely unknown to the average citizen. Chaplains contribute to the National Defense at the international level, the Service level, and the personal level. The Navy Chaplain Corps, representing fundamental national values, contributes directly to the National Defense and America’s relationships with other countries. For instance, Navy chaplains engage with foreign civil and religious leaders in partner nations to build friendship and represent the power of free people through piety, devotion and practical support without violence or prejudice.

U.S. Sailors salute a service member’s remains on the pier before bringing them aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) for a burial-at-sea Aug 10, 2019. The John C. Stennis is pierside in its new home port, Norfolk, after completing a seven-month deployment, and is preparing for refueling complex overhaul. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mitchell Banks)

Chaplains provide value and irreplaceable service to the Department of the Navy, the Department of Defense, and the Department of Homeland Security, supporting our most fundamental form of diversity within the Navy, diversity of thought and perspective. Without Navy chaplains at home and abroad to facilitate the free exercise of their religion, many devout citizens from every faith would take their virtues, strengths, knowledge, and abilities to other services or simply refrain from military service altogether.

Without the confidential communication that Navy chaplains offer the people they serve, fewer service members in distress would seek and receive the medical, social, or mental health assistance they need to stay fit to fight. Multiple studies, like the 2013 study done by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, show that chaplains are the most trusted helping professionals for Navy personnel seeking assistance. Chaplains help Marines, Sailors and the Coast Guard to stay ready, lethal, and fit to fight by ensuring that everyone at home or at sea gets the care they need from the right professional at the right time.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/02/21/chaplain-corps-provides-irreplaceable-services/ poyrazdogany

Department of the Navy FY 2021 President’s Budget

The Fiscal Year 2021 (FY21) President’s Budget submission (PB21) of $207.1B is an increase of $1.9B (0.9%) from the FY20 enacted budget (base+OCO), less $4.8B added by Congress in Natural Disaster funding we received in FY20. This budget supports irreversible implementation of the National Defense Strategy (NDS) and balances priorities in order to maximize naval power now and in the future.

This budget achieves several major goals. First, PB21 recapitalizes the COLUMBIA strategic ballistic missile submarine, our nation’s ultimate insurance policy and the Navy’s highest priority.  Next, this budget sustains our readiness recovery to deliver credible forces to win today’s fight. Third, PB21 aggressively pursues increased lethality and targets those areas of modernization with the greatest potential to deliver non-linear warfighting advantages.

This budget also prioritizes the development and delivery of Naval Expeditionary forces capable of imposing cost with distributed, lethal power that is sustainable. Finally, this budget delivers capable capacity within the constraints of our budget topline.

These investments will maximize our Naval power and deliver a larger overall Navy as our battle force grows from 293 today to 306 by the end of FY21. PB21 delivers a better and more innovative force through investments that improve our legacy platforms and provide for a more robust and lethal mix of next-generation opportunities while supporting dynamic force employment, keeping the Navy and Marine Corps more agile, lethal, and adaptable.

Military Construction funds 32 projects: 8 new platform/mission, 2 European Deterrence Initiative, 2 Reserve, 10 Guam, 1 Naval shipyard, and 9 replacement of aging infrastructure. Family Housing funds O&M, recapitalization, leasing, and privatization oversight.

Research & Development increases 5% over FY20, providing innovative capabilities in shipbuilding (Columbia class), aviation (F-35), weapons (Maritime Strike Tomahawk), hypersonics (Conventional Prompt Strike), unmanned, family of lasers, digital warfare, applied AI, and USMC expeditionary equipment. These technologies are crucial to maintaining DON’s competitive advantage.

The budget provides for a deployable battle force of 306 ships in FY21.  This supports 11 aircraft carriers and 33 amphibious ships that serve as the foundation for our carrier and amphibious ready groups. 

In FY21, 15 battle force ships will be delivered:  4 Destroyers, 3 Nuclear Attack Submarines (SSN), 5 Littoral Combat Ships, 1 Amphibious Transport Dock (LPD 17), 1 Fleet Replenishment Oiler (T-AO), and 1 Towing, Salvage, and Rescue Ship (T-ATS). Additionally, 6 battle force ships will be retired:  4 LCS, 1 LSD-41, and 1 T-ATF.    

Ship procurement funds 8 new-construction battle force ships in FY21 (1 SSBN, 1SSN, 2 DDG, 1 FFG(X), 1 LPD 17 Flight II, 2 T-ATS), as well as 2 Large Unmanned Surface Vessels (USVs); and funds 44 battle force ships/17 unmanned vessels across the Future Years Defense Plan (FYDP).

Aircraft procurement funds 121 airframes (fixed-wing, rotary-wing, unmanned) in FY21 (10 F-35B, 21 F-35C, 4 E-2D, 24 F/A-18E/F, 5 KC-130J, 7 CH-53K, 6 CMV-22, 3 MV-22B, 36 TH-73A, and 5 VH-92A; and funds 537 airframes across the FYDP.

Key readiness programs are funded: Ship Depot Maintenance (resourced to executable capacity); Ship Operations (58 days/quarter deployed & 24 days/quarter non-deployed); Air Depot Maintenance (funded to maximum throughput); Flying Hours (aligned with increasing mission capable rates); Marine Corps expeditionary equipment (80% serviceability); and facilities sustainment to 81% of the sustainment model (both Navy & USMC).

Overseas Contingency Operations funding increases by 13.8%.

Our integrated Business Operations Plan aligns to the NDS and allows us to create departmental processes that directly support reform. Savings of -$1.4B in FY21/-$12.3B FYDP have been reinvested due to divestments (less capable platforms), business process improvements (e.g. execution reviews/SSC delays), business systems improvements (e.g. aviation cross functional teams), weapons systems acquisition (e.g. MYPs), and policy reforms (e.g. Performance-to-Plan/USMC Military End Strength reductions).

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/02/10/department-of-the-navy-fy-2021-presidents-budget/ U.S. Navy

Regional Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment

“Sexual harassment and sexual assault are unconscionable and inexcusable actions. These acts don’t just attack the individual, they attack our entire Naval family and the ideals for which we all stand. I know that the leaders from colleges and universities who are joining us in this important regional discussion feel the same way about their institutions and their academic families. We must stand together, learn from each other, and declare together our common commitment to enabling our finest young people to stay focused on their mission and education without the threat of harassment and assault.” –Secretary of the Navy Thomas B. Modly

Welcome to the Navy Live blog for the 2020 Regional Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment. Below you will find news articles, personal commentary from Navy senior leaders, and other content from the Feb. 6 event, in which the Department of the Navy (DON) and the University of New Mexico share strategies for combating assault and harassment in the academic setting.

Click here for the schedule of events.

For more information about the speakers, as well as resource materials on the Navy effort to prevent and respond to sexual assault and sexual harassment, visit the official event page on the Office of the Secretary of the Navy website.

These partnerships serve to align our efforts in order to prevent sexual assault.  It’s vitally important that we synchronize our efforts, share initiatives, and collaborate in order to get at the problem.  Together, we are stronger. –DON, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) Director Melissa Cohen

Better People. Better Leaders. Better Nation
By Rear Adm. (ret.) Margaret Kibben
Senior Advisor, Department of the Navy, SAPRO

Addressing sexual assault is a priority for the military, and given the shared demographics, it should be no surprise that colleges and universities are contending with the same issue.  In April last year, the Secretary of the Navy convened the first National Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment at America’s Colleges, Universities and Service Academies at the United States Naval Academy.  Acting Secretary of the Navy, Thomas Modly, has indicated that “these are the community-level approaches we need to get after not just a military, university or industry-specific issue, but one of the toughest societal issues we face.”

As follow-up to last year’s national conference, the Department of the Navy’s Sexual Assault and Prevention Office (DoNSAPRO) is co-hosting with the University of New Mexico (UNM) a Regional Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment at America’s Colleges, Universities and Service Academies: Achieving Cultural Change through Data and an Evaluation Mindset. Experts from academia, the military, and other government agencies will be meeting together to discuss ways to eliminate sexual violence.

The partnership between DoNSAPRO and UNM is a natural fit. UNM is home to three ROTC programs (Army, Air Force, and Navy/Marine Corps) and has made a concerted effort to increase access to higher education for New Mexico’s veterans and their families. Sharing information, best practices, and effective methods for the prevention and response to sexual assault benefits both the university and military communities.

Of specific interest to this region is the startling fact that Indigenous people in the U.S. face higher rates of sexual violence than the general population. UNM has identified its intent to focus on this demographic and to address the concern that the numbers are even greater given the disinclination for this population to report. Discussions with regional experts, students, and staff, will serve to shed light on this question and its impact on the university and military community.

DoNSAPRO instituted the regional discussions in order to contribute to and participate in these very particular issues, as well as to advance the efforts in addressing mutual challenges. The first regional discussion was held in coordination with the State University of New York (SUNY) and has yielded productive and coordinated research in information gathering, (e.g., survey questions), to identify precursor behaviors in order to prevent sexual assault. Together SUNY, UNM, and other colleges and universities have partnered with DoNSAPRO to study bystander intervention, alcohol misuse, behavioral indicators, and other contributing factors, that contribute to sexual assault.


Additional resources on sexual assault and harassment in the military context:

Sexual Assault Prevention and Response/Commander, Navy Installations Command

United States Department of Defense Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Reports

Navy Live blog coverage of the National Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment at America’s colleges and universities, April 4-5, 2019

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/02/05/regional-discussion-on-sexual-assault-and-sexual-harassment/ U.S. Navy

Best Job I’ve Ever Had

(New Year’s Day 2020 Deck Log Entry)

By Quartermaster 3rd Class Sara Nevison,
Deployed at Sea on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)

NOTE: The New Year’s Day deck log is a longstanding U.S. Navy tradition, in which a Sailor on watch pens his or her reflections in verse, which the watch stander on duty at midnight then enters into the deck log. For more on this tradition, see this article from Naval History and Heritage Command.

As another year comes to an end,
Sailors reflect on the past
And how it all began.

COMPTUEX was the first chapter
Of our long extended adventure.
Countless Surprise GQs and neverending
EMCON conditions
Were the ship’s main ambition.

But together through it all
All the Sailors stood tall
With acceptance of the fate
The ship was soon going to face.

‘Twas the night before deployment,
And all through the base,
Every Lincoln Sailor packing
Their sea bags and suitcase.
Saying goodbye to families
Because it’s the last day.

6th Fleet was our first stop.
Palma De Mallorca, Spain,
Made our mouths drop.
Such a beautiful place to see—
We wondered what the next port would be.

Duqm 1, Duqm 2, Duqm 3,
Arabian Sea.
Swim call, swim call—
Happy birthday, USS Abraham Lincoln!
The water is welcome to all.

Six short blasts are sounded:
Man overboard man overboard!
The chem light bandit still isn’t found yet.
Extensions upon extensions—
The ship was very much needed.
Missing holidays with family
Everyone felt defeated.

Good morning, Lincoln Nation!
We finally got some information.
We are headed to 7th Fleet,
But first we to clean
Your filthy pollywog feet.

We crossed the equator
And to become a shellback was in favor.
Covered in green slime
And drenched in saltwater of course,
We were accepted into King Neptune’s Court.

As we start off a new year,
Lincoln Sailors are in joy and glee
To what we leave behind in 2019.
Lots of memories and lots of fun,
But what comes next in 2020 has begun.

200101-N-ME568-1001 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 1, 2020) Quartermaster 3rd Class Ryan Gouger, from Newberg, Ore., enters the ship’s coordinates in the ship’s position log while standing Quartermaster of the Watch on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dan Snow/Released)
200101-N-ME568-1003 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 1, 2020) Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Kayla Whitcomb, from Springfield, Ill., rings in the new year with 16 bells while standing Boatswain’s Mate of the Watch on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dan Snow/Released)

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/12/31/best-job-ive-ever-had/ U.S. Navy

Best Job I’ve Ever Had

(New Year’s Day 2020 Deck Log Entry)

By Quartermaster 3rd Class Sara Nevison,
Deployed at Sea on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)

NOTE: The New Year’s Day deck log is a longstanding U.S. Navy tradition, in which a Sailor on watch pens his or her reflections in verse, which the watch stander on duty at midnight then enters into the deck log. For more on this tradition, see this article from Naval History and Heritage Command.

As another year comes to an end,
Sailors reflect on the past
And how it all began.

COMPTUEX was the first chapter
Of our long extended adventure.
Countless Surprise GQs and neverending
EMCON conditions
Were the ship’s main ambition.

But together through it all
All the Sailors stood tall
With acceptance of the fate
The ship was soon going to face.

‘Twas the night before deployment,
And all through the base,
Every Lincoln Sailor packing
Their sea bags and suitcase.
Saying goodbye to families
Because it’s the last day.

6th Fleet was our first stop.
Palma De Mallorca, Spain,
Made our mouths drop.
Such a beautiful place to see—
We wondered what the next port would be.

Duqm 1, Duqm 2, Duqm 3,
Arabian Sea.
Swim call, swim call—
Happy birthday, USS Abraham Lincoln!
The water is welcome to all.

Six short blasts are sounded:
Man overboard man overboard!
The chem light bandit still isn’t found yet.
Extensions upon extensions—
The ship was very much needed.
Missing holidays with family
Everyone felt defeated.

Good morning, Lincoln Nation!
We finally got some information.
We are headed to 7th Fleet,
But first we to clean
Your filthy pollywog feet.

We crossed the equator
And to become a shellback was in favor.
Covered in green slime
And drenched in saltwater of course,
We were accepted into King Neptune’s Court.

As we start off a new year,
Lincoln Sailors are in joy and glee
To what we leave behind in 2019.
Lots of memories and lots of fun,
But what comes next in 2020 has begun.

200101-N-ME568-1001 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 1, 2020) Quartermaster 3rd Class Ryan Gouger, from Newberg, Ore., enters the ship’s coordinates in the ship’s position log while standing Quartermaster of the Watch on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dan Snow/Released)
200101-N-ME568-1003 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 1, 2020) Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Kayla Whitcomb, from Springfield, Ill., rings in the new year with 16 bells while standing Boatswain’s Mate of the Watch on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dan Snow/Released)

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/12/31/best-job-ive-ever-had/ U.S. Navy