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Category Archives: Chief Petty Officer

The Navy Picked You for a Reason

By Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday

Today, around the Navy and around the world, men and women—Sailors—are making an incredible transition and advancing to Chief Petty Officer. The Navy Memorial is one of our most sacred places, here in Washington, D.C., and today I will stand with a group of Sailors who will receive their anchors. I can’t think of a more fitting place to celebrate such a transformational day.

Over the past six weeks, many Sailors have been challenged, and those challenges were hard but nothing compared to what they will face in the years to come. And that’s ok, because challenge is good. Challenges strengthen us. As I reflect on the critical impact Chiefs have had on my life and career, I am convinced of the importance of the Mess as an institution.

My first Chief told me that our most important weapons system is our Navy Team and their families. People are and will continue to be our key competitive advantage over any adversary. The fact that I am highlighting this enduring principle, 34 years after I first heard it from my Chief, reflects how pivotal Chief Petty Officers have been in my own life and career.

Every time I get the opportunity to reconnect with a group of Chiefs, I leave feeling uplifted and inspired. Those brief times reinforce how important the institution of the Chief Petty Officers’ Mess is to our Navy and our nation.

I use that word institution carefully. When we use it, we often do so to indicate something that has merely been around for a long time. That’s not what I mean today. That usage of the word indicates staleness and complacency, the exact opposite of what the Chiefs’ Mess represents. The original meaning is far better. The word “institution” is the “action of establishing or founding” and under this definition, the institution of the Chiefs’ Mess is not who you are, or the insignia you wear, or the fact that we’ve marked this occasion for many years, but what you do, the actions you take, day-in, and day-out, large and small—that Chiefs routinely undertake to enable our Sailors to perform at their very best.

Even the briefest review of history demonstrates that Chief Petty Officers are Sailors of action. Some of their names, like John Finn, or Oscar Peterson or Peter Tomich—all Chiefs who were awarded the Medal of Honor—are legends in their own right. These examples of valor and of sacrifice are worthy of telling and retelling, but there is something even greater than these individual examples. Our Navy’s achievements throughout our history are due in large measure to the training and mentorship provided by Chief Petty Officers.

Later this year, we’ll commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Leyte Gulf. The line of heroes we look to for inspiration from that series of combat actions is long as well. We will remember Cmdr. Ernest Evans and Lt. Cmdr. Robert Copeland and Gunner’s Mate Third Class Paul Carr. A Chief isn’t in that list, but the Sailors and Officers we lionize from that battle were all trained and mentored by Chief Petty Officers. Those Chiefs would probably tell you that they weren’t looking for credit. They weren’t looking to get their name mentioned by the CNO 75 years later. They were focused on the actions they needed to take to establish the Chiefs’ Mess, to institute the Chiefs’ Mess—every day. They were focused on making our Navy team the most lethal weapons system in our arsenal and they were focused on creating winners – the Sailors and Officers whose actions would cement the U.S. Navy’s combat record and show that our destroyers can fight like battleships as they did at Leyte Gulf.

I sent a letter to all of the Chiefs who just donned their anchors, and I’ve charged them and those who already wear anchors to think about the Chiefs’ Mess as an institution: the sum of the daily acts, both small and large, that continue to challenge us and force us to rise to the standards of those who came before. The actions that will leave our Navy in a better position tomorrow. I also told them that this can’t happen from the physical space of the Mess. They have to be constantly involved in their Sailors’ lives on and off duty.

Chiefs, carrying forward the legacy of those who came before you will test you, and will draw on all the skills, knowledge, and experiences that formed the basis for your selection. The demands you face are tall indeed, and I have high expectations of our Chief Petty Officers, as do the Sailors you serve and lead. However, I am confident that you’ll rise to meet these obligations, making the most of each and every day, leading Sailors and Officers to fulfill the promise of their potential. The challenges we face as a Navy and a nation demand that you do so, as do those who wore anchors before you. We need your best efforts more than ever. I want every Chief in the fleet, new and old, to remember that the Navy not only expects more of you, but demands it—now more than ever. To those of you donning your anchors today, congratulations. You are now the Chief! Thank you for all that you do, and I’ll see you out in the fleet.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/09/18/the-navy-picked-you-for-a-reason/ poyrazdogany

Happy 126th Birthday Chiefs – Chief On!

By Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Russell Smith

In the beginning there was no birthday, no Mess, no initiation process. There were only Sailors, salty with experience and a deep conviction to bridge the gap between the vision their officers had and the Sailors who executed the mission. Recognizing a seam, Chief Petty Officers were created to provide the kind of pragmatic leadership and guidance that enlisted Sailors could understand and relate to, enabling our Navy to move forward as the operating environment began to evolve beyond the simple age of sail and traditional Sailor skills.

ROTA, Spain (March 11, 2019) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Russell Smith speaks to Sailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Sarah Villegas/Released)
ROTA, Spain (March 11, 2019) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Russell Smith speaks to Sailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Sarah Villegas/Released)

Over the years our Mess has grown and adapted to both the operating environment of our vessels and the Sailors who choose our way of life. Over successive generations, our Sailors have become smarter, more fit and a better demographic representation of the Nation we serve. We began as the sole purveyors of experience, the ones you needed to hear from before tackling any complex deckplate evolution — the lessons of sweat and blood were “our” currency, our relevance, and we taught many a junior Sailor and many a junior Officer how to avoid the worst mistakes and safely navigate to mission success.

In turn, Chief Petty Officers have found greater opportunity, and a corresponding desire by the Navy to fold Chief Petty Officers into more complex roles of leadership and management. In 1958, the pay grades of E8 and E9 were created to specifically retain the talent and expertise that was deemed crucial to the future success of our Navy; less than a decade later, Master Chief Gunner’s Mate Del Black would become the first Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, signaling a level of leadership and Navy-wide involvement that just 30 years before could not possibly have been conceived of. Chief Petty Officers raised the bar, elevated the game and catapulted our Navy towards new and greater success.

Shortly before the USS Cole was attacked, she got underway for deployment with an entirely enlisted Bridge Watch Team — proving that crew’s mettle and ultimately enabling those who survived the initial attack to save their ship and their shipmates. We have enlisted performing in a myriad of ways that those “old salts” sitting around and sharing information in those famous photos from the late 1800s could never have imagined. And yet, as a Mess, our mission remains the same — bound genetically to our core responsibility within the Navy to primarily represent the equity of experience. Technical experts, knowledgeable and learned in the nuances of our trade, operators who guide both the young Sailors we are charged with preparing for combat, as well as those young Officers whose lead we will follow in combat.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 21, 2019) Senior Chief Damage Controlman Jeff Tobey, from Kittering, Maine, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4), instructs Electrician’s Mate 2nd Class Clayton Saving, from Carthage, Missouri, in the hangar bay during a main space fire drill. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Keypher Strombeck/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 21, 2019) Senior Chief Damage Controlman Jeff Tobey, from Kittering, Maine, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4), instructs Electrician’s Mate 2nd Class Clayton Saving, from Carthage, Missouri, in the hangar bay during a main space fire drill. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Keypher Strombeck/Released)

A special faith and trust has been reposed in us as we occupy this unique and unparalleled strata of leadership — other services and other nations have senior enlisted leaders, but the United States Navy Chief Petty Officers are cut from a different cloth, raised to perform in collegial fashion to stitch the disparate parts of our Navy together, to leverage the power of our Mess to make the Navy greater than the sum of our parts.

We should take the opportunity to reflect on where this latest year of growth and development has taken us, and as a Mess decide how to best calibrate and align ourselves to the true north of our forebearers — making those who sailed before us proud of the legacy of selfless, uncelebrating service they entrusted to us. Every day we walk aboard our ship, squadron, station or unit we should feel an unabated sense of urgency to prove our value and serve our Sailors, to realize our strengths, and then humbly yet confidently wield that influence and knowledge to prepare our Sailors for combat — and lead them to victory once it begins.

At the end of today, and at the end of every day, I would ask each of you — as I ask of myself — to spend a few moments in quiet contemplation on those expectations levied upon us. To ask, as in that penultimate moment of “Saving Private Ryan” — did I “earn this?”

Happy 126th Birthday Chiefs – Chief On!

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/04/01/happy-126th-birthday-chiefs-chief-on/ U.S. Navy

Chief Petty Officer Pinning and Advancement Ceremony

Watch as our newest chief petty officers in the National Capital Region are pinned with anchors and advanced to the rank of chief during a ceremony at the U.S. Navy Memorial in Washington D.C., Sept. 14. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson will be the ceremony’s keynote speaker.

Live coverage is scheduled to begin at 10:30 a.m. (EDT)

MCPON’s charge to #CPOSelectees – Humility is key to success as a Chief Petty Officer. Never forget where you came from.

Posted by Office of the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy on Wednesday, September 12, 2018

 

What advice do you have for our newest chief petty officers? Tell us in the comments below!

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/09/13/chief-petty-officer-pinning-and-advancement-ceremony/ Jason Kelly

MCPON’s Message to the Mess: It’s in the Creed

The following message was sent Jan. 26, 2018, by Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Steven S. Giordano to the Chief’s Mess. 

Reflecting upon numerous conversations with you, my fellow Chiefs, and the resounding voices of Sailors at all levels throughout the fleet, I have come to realize the expectations of a Chief Petty Officer may have become somewhat muddled. Please allow me to offer some clarity on this subject…  It’s in the Creed. The Creed states, “More will be expected of you; more will be demanded of you.” These words and others contained in the Creed reminds us of our responsibilities as technical experts, continuous learners, coaches, decision-makers and communicators.

All of us, from the most junior Chief to the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy must be focused in our collective effort to become an even stronger more capable and resilient force by centering ourselves on the CPO Creed and our Navy Core Values to meet the expectations of our Officers, Sailors, families and peers.

SASEBO, Japan (Jan. 18, 2018) Chief petty officers of Afloat Training Group (ATG) Fleet Activities Sasebo, assess Operations Specialist 3rd Class Cody Wood, during a combat systems drill in the combat information center aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6). The drill was the final assessment in a series of evaluations conducted to certify the combat systems readiness of Bonhomme Richard as the ship prepares for an upcoming scheduled deployment. Bonhomme Richard, forward-deployed to Sasebo, Japan, is serving forward to provide a rapid-response capability in the event of a regional contingency or natural disaster. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cosmo Walrath/Released)
SASEBO, Japan (Jan. 18, 2018) Chief petty officers of Afloat Training Group (ATG) Fleet Activities Sasebo, assess Operations Specialist 3rd Class Cody Wood, during a combat systems drill in the combat information center aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6). The drill was the final assessment in a series of evaluations conducted to certify the combat systems readiness of Bonhomme Richard as the ship prepares for an upcoming scheduled deployment. Bonhomme Richard, forward-deployed to Sasebo, Japan, is serving forward to provide a rapid-response capability in the event of a regional contingency or natural disaster. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cosmo Walrath/Released)

 

Over the last year, I have traveled thousands of miles around the globe, visiting hundreds of organizations across every warfare community and speaking with tens of thousands of Sailors. It’s immensely humbling to witness their commitment and listen to their stories. Nothing is more heartening than seeing first-hand what our Sailors are doing and having honest conversations about what we can do better as a Navy. These young minds have so much to offer. They truly are the most talented force we have ever had. We only need to be sure to listen and reinforce our support. So, as you are conducting quarters, walking the deckplates and engaging in social media, remember our actions will either reinforce or weaken our core attributes of initiative, integrity, accountability and toughness throughout our ranks. Keeping in mind, “challenge is good; a great and necessary reality which cannot mar you – which, in fact, strengthens you.” Bettering our Navy is going to take the whole team.  Therefore, every Chief must approach each day and every interaction — in person or on social media — with even the most junior of Sailors with an open mind; being receptive to the concerns, questions and ideas.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 20, 2018) Chief Fire Controlman Larry Evans gives safety training on the M240B machine gun to Sailors on the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS Anchorage (LPD 23). Anchorage was underway to support NASA's Orion spacecraft Underway Recovery Test 6 (URT-6). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Natalie M. Byers/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 20, 2018) Chief Fire Controlman Larry Evans gives safety training on the M240B machine gun to Sailors on the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS Anchorage (LPD 23). Anchorage was underway to support NASA’s Orion spacecraft Underway Recovery Test 6 (URT-6). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Natalie M. Byers/Released)

 

As we embark on this new year, we must be more focused than ever on leading forward in our efforts to strengthen enlisted leader development for all ranks, tackle destructive behaviors even in our own ranks, and eliminate unnecessary burdens that distract us from our warfighting priority.

Additionally, based on your feedback and that of our Sailors, we need to do a better job of ensuring information flows between the strategic, operational and tactical levels. It’s just as important for those on the deckplates to understand what’s going on at the strategic level, as it is for those at the strategic level to understand the perspective from the deckplates. This duality is critical for our Navy’s continued success. We need to improve in our ability to interpret higher echelon information and make it relevant to the Sailors operating on the deckplates. This requires a multi-pronged communication approach from NAVADMINs to all-hands calls and from emails to Facebook posts. However, while Sailors are connected online we must ensure they do not become disconnected from leadership.

The heartbeat of communicating with our Sailors remains the Chief! Stand-up in front of them and educate your Sailors on what’s going on in the Navy. Challenge the communication model. If you believe you are not receiving information that is being brought to your attention by your Sailors, reach to the next level for guidance. Do not accept the “I don’t know” answer. “Ask the Chief is a household phrase.”

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dec. 08, 2017) Senior Chief Operations Specialist Nicole White reads a pre-planned response checklist during an anti-terrorism drill aboard the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Vella Gulf (CG 72). Vella Gulf was on a routine deployment to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations to conduct maritime security operations in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe. (U.S. Navy photo by Ensign Elizabeth Moon/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dec. 08, 2017) Senior Chief Operations Specialist Nicole White reads a pre-planned response checklist during an anti-terrorism drill aboard the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Vella Gulf (CG 72). Vella Gulf was on a routine deployment to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations to conduct maritime security operations in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe. (U.S. Navy photo by Ensign Elizabeth Moon/Released)

 

We must not even for a second forget the incredible privilege it is to serve our Navy as Chief Petty Officers. It is a privilege that must be earned every day. We are the technical experts, the mentors, and trusted advisors. As Chiefs, your words and actions must not waver from our abiding loyalty to the Navy, our Core Values, and the ideals that Chief Petty Officers stand for. Being forever mindful “trust is inherent with the donning of the uniform of a Chief.” 

On April 1, 2018, we will celebrate our 125th anniversary. It’s been a strong 125 years of making our Navy run as its backbone, but we have plenty to learn. Learn from the mistakes, capture our successes, and share insights. We must continue to engage, develop and challenge ourselves to be better. It’s what we do as Chiefs! “Your performance has assured us that you will wear the hat with the same pride as your comrades in arms before you.” That’s how we will strengthen the Navy this year and every year – from the sea floor to space.

Ultimately, we’re seeking to continuously shape our Navy to become safer, more lethal, and enable it to build stronger partnerships. The over thirty thousand active and reserve Chief Petty Officers who wear anchors are the conduits to making that happen. If you haven’t done so yet this year, take time to read the CPO Creed carefully and reflect on its meaning. There are no greater words of influence than what’s written in the Creed. It’s timeless. Take a hard look at the Creed as you embark on 2018. Read it, understand it, and live by it. Separately, our daily duties, mission and challenges may be unique, but the Creed is the marrow that bonds us together into a unified backbone for the Navy.

I urge all of you to strive to be visible, confidently humble deckplate leaders, more authentic, competent and courageous in leading our Navy team forward every day. Challenge yourself and accept those of your Sailors!  “The exalted position you have now achieved – and the word exalted is used advisedly – exists because of the attitude and performance of the Chiefs before you. It shall exist only as long as you and your fellow Chiefs maintain these standards.”

Steven S. Giordano
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/01/29/mcpons-message-to-the-mess-its-in-the-creed/ U.S. Navy

Chief Petty Officer Pinning and Advancement Ceremony

Watch as our newest chief petty officers in the National Capitol Region are pinned with anchors and advanced to the rank of chief during a ceremony at the U.S. Navy Memorial in Washington D.C., Sept. 15.

Live video is scheduled to begin 10 a.m. EDT.

Join the #USNavy conversation on social media on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and Flickr.

Congratulate the Navy’s newest chiefs by leaving a comment below.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/09/15/chief-petty-officer-ceremony/ U.S. Navy

10 Things to know about U.S. Navy Chiefs

Effectively running and fighting a warship relies on bridging the gap between officers and enlisted personnel. It was from this need that the creation of the rank of chief petty officer was born.

The chief petty officer as it is recognized today was officially established April 1, 1893. Armed with official recognition, chiefs of the past went on to lay the foundation for their modern day counterparts.

Below are 10 things that you should know about U.S. Navy chief petty officers.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 16, 2016) Fiscal Year 2017 chief petty officers stand at attention during a chief pinning ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Gaines/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 16, 2016) Fiscal Year 2017 chief petty officers stand at attention during a chief pinning ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Gaines/Released)

1. The earliest known use of the title “chief” dates back to 1776 when Jacob Wasbie, a cook’s mate, was pronounced “Chief Cook” aboard USS Alfred. The title was largely informal and was used to denote him as the foremost cook aboard the ship.

NAVAL AIR FACILITY ATSUGI, Japan: Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Casey Clark, assigned to Navy Munitions Command East Asia Division (NMCEAD) Atsugi, receives his combination cover during the chief petty officer pinning ceremony held at Naval Air Facility (NAF) Atsugi's Cinema 77. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason Bawgus/Released)
NAVAL AIR FACILITY ATSUGI, Japan: Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Casey Clark, assigned to Navy Munitions Command East Asia Division (NMCEAD) Atsugi, receives his combination cover during the chief petty officer pinning ceremony held at Naval Air Facility (NAF) Atsugi’s Cinema 77. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason Bawgus/Released)

2. Since 1797, only two ratings for chiefs that have remained in continuous use are boatswain’s mate and gunner’s mate.

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Aug. 9, 2016) – Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate Mumira Ferah from San Jose, Calif., gives instructions aboard USS Ross (DDG 71) during a replenishment at-sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198) Aug. 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Theron J. Godbold/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Aug. 9, 2016) – Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate Mumira Ferah from San Jose, Calif., gives instructions aboard USS Ross (DDG 71) during a replenishment-at-sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198) Aug. 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Theron J. Godbold/Released)

3. On March 21, 1917, Loretta Walsh became the first woman Navy petty officer when sworn in as a chief yeoman.

PACIFIC OCEAN (April 1, 2014) Chief Ship’s Serviceman Barbara Lynch, left, Chief Cryptologic Technician Technical Ashley Jones, Chief Information Systems Technician Warren Quiambao, and Chief Legalman Justin Wheeler demonstrate the wear of chief petty officer uniforms throughout history. The chief petty officer grade was first established April 1, 1893 by Navy General Order 409. (U.S. Navy graphic by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/ Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (April 1, 2014) Chief Ship’s Serviceman Barbara Lynch, left, Chief Cryptologic Technician Technical Ashley Jones, Chief Information Systems Technician Warren Quiambao, and Chief Legalman Justin Wheeler demonstrate the wear of chief petty officer uniforms throughout history. (U.S. Navy graphic by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/ Released)

4. The advent of a rocker device was the first distinction and was originally borrowed from the master-at-arms rating and became official in 1894. The foul anchor cap device was approved in 1905, and collar devices became official in 1959.

WASHINGTON (April 1, 2015) Command Master Chief Christian Detje, assigned to the United States Navy Ceremonial Guard, stands at ease during a celebration of the 122nd birthday of the chief petty officer rank at the United States Navy Memorial. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)
WASHINGTON (April 1, 2015) Command Master Chief Christian Detje, assigned to the United States Navy Ceremonial Guard, stands at ease during a celebration of the 122nd birthday of the chief petty officer rank at the United States Navy Memorial. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

5. By 1941, all chief petty officers were authorized to wear khaki working uniforms. ALNAV 16 (Feb. 21, 1941) authorized khaki working uniforms for all chief petty officers and officers serving on all ships and shore stations.

SASEBO, Japan: Chief Navy Counselor Bethany Hale passes through sideboys after being pinned chief petty officer at the Career Education Center aboard Commander, U.S. Fleet Activities Sasebo. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class David R. Krigbaum/Released)
SASEBO, Japan: Chief Navy Counselor Bethany Hale passes through sideboys after being pinned chief petty officer at the Career Education Center aboard Commander, U.S. Fleet Activities Sasebo. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class David R. Krigbaum/Released)

6. There are approximately 30,000+ chief, senior chief and master chief petty officers in the Navy.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Sept. 16, 2014) Chief petty officers assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17, and Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1, stand in ranks with the Chiefs Mess after they are pinned in the hangar bay aboard Carl Vinson. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Sept. 16, 2014) Chief petty officers assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17, and Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1, stand in ranks with the Chiefs Mess after they are pinned in the hangar bay aboard Carl Vinson. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

7. A chief petty officer is equivalent to a gunnery sergeant in the U.S. Marine Corps, sergeant first class in the U.S. Army, and a master sergeant in the U.S. Air Force.

Gunnery Sgt. Corey Hall participates in a CPO 365 Phase II drill and cadence event during CPO Pride Week 2016 in Pearl Hawaii, Sept. 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Johans Chavarro/Released)
Gunnery Sgt. Corey Hall participates in a CPO 365 Phase II drill and cadence event during CPO Pride Week 2016 in Pearl Hawaii, Sept. 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Johans Chavarro/Released)

8. U.S. Navy chief petty officers are afforded more responsibility than any other enlisted rank in the world.

Chiefs combination covers lay displayed on a table prior to the arrival of the U.S. Navy's newest Chief Petty Officers, Sept. 19, 2009. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gary A. Prill (RELEASED))
Chiefs combination covers lay displayed on a table prior to the arrival of the U.S. Navy’s newest chief petty officers, Sept. 19, 2009. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gary A. Prill/Released)

9. More than 50 chief petty officers have been awarded the Medal of Honor.

WASHINGTON (Feb. 29, 2016) President Barack Obama presents the Medal of Honor to Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Edward C. Byers Jr. during a ceremony at the White House. Byers received the Medal of Honor for his actions during a hostage rescue operation in December 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Oscar Sosa/Released)
WASHINGTON (Feb. 29, 2016) President Barack Obama presents the Medal of Honor to Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Edward C. Byers Jr. during a ceremony at the White House. Byers received the Medal of Honor for his actions during a hostage rescue operation in December 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Oscar Sosa/Released)

10. On average, Sailors advance to chief petty officer in about 13 years of active duty.

EVERETT, Wash. (Sept. 14, 2012) Newly-pinned chief petty officers salute during a chief petty officer pinning ceremony in the Grand Vista Ballroom at Naval Station Everett. The Naval Station welcomed 24 newly pinned Sailors to the rank of chief petty officer during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeffry Willadsen/Released)
EVERETT, Wash. (Sept. 14, 2012) Newly-pinned chief petty officers salute during a chief petty officer pinning ceremony in the Grand Vista Ballroom at Naval Station Everett. The Naval Station welcomed 24 newly pinned Sailors to the rank of a chief petty officer during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeffry Willadsen/Released)

 

Congratulate our chief petty officers, past and present, for their 124 years of deckplate leadership by leaving a comment below.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/03/31/10-things-to-know-about-u-s-navy-chiefs/ U.S. Navy

My Navy Chief Taught Me …

April 1 marks 124 years of deckplate leadership by our Navy chiefs. Navy General Order 409 established the rank of chief petty officer in 1893.

As we approached the birthday of the Navy chief, we asked our Facebook fans what their chief taught them about integrity, accountability, initiative and toughness. Below are some of their responses. After you’ve read them, add to the list by commenting at the end of this blog.

Cory P.:

“Integrity and accountability was the corner stone for everything. Without that, you can’t be a leader especially if no one will believe or you blame everything on others. These two things allowed you to have the toughness to be Innovative and make a change. “

ARABIAN GULF (Sept. 15, 2015) – Chief Logistics Specialist Donna Massie stands at attention after being pinned during a chief pinning ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Anna Van Nuys/Released)
ARABIAN GULF (Sept. 15, 2015) – Chief Logistics Specialist Donna Massie stands at attention after being pinned during a chief pinning ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Anna Van Nuys/Released)

Kim. R.:

“My dad is my chief, senior chief in fact! He taught me about integrity, work ethic, the importance of knowing how to swim and how to lead by example. He’s an incredible man, retired after 22 years of service, and I couldn’t be more proud to have him as my dad! “

Chief Electronics Technician Richard Strader hugs his children after being pinned as a chief petty officer at Commander, Operational Test and Evaluation Force, in Norfolk, Sept. 16, 2015. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chelsea Mandello/Released)
Chief Electronics Technician Richard Strader hugs his children after being pinned as a chief petty officer at Commander, Operational Test and Evaluation Force, in Norfolk, Sept. 16, 2015. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chelsea Mandello/Released)

Paul O.:

“The chief that made a difference in my life was when I was in deck division, hated it there – severely mismanaged bunch of misfits. Sucked all the life out of me even wanting to be in the military. Was standing watch one day as MOOW and my OOD was our QMC. He tried to talk to me about what my goals were and I told him I hated the Navy and couldn’t wait to get out. He told me that was too bad because I had a very good record and reputation around the ship. Then he said if I wanted to strike QM and work for him and give him 100% and then when it was time for me to get out and I still wanted to, he would shake my hand and thank me for everything and he’d carry my sea bag down the pier for me. It was the first time anyone believed in me and I did not want to disappoint him. That started me on a 24 year career that I loved. I retired at 2010 as a QMCS and thanked him in my retirement speech for being the difference in my career. I did all I could to do the same for my Sailors, because they were worth it.”

Quartermaster Seaman Jason Schutzman (left) and Chief Quartermaster Jory Mason, an inspector with Afloat Training Group Western Pacific, review flag signal cards prior to a flag hoist drill during the final evaluation period aboard the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) in the South China Sea, Oct. 5, 2012.. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Tatiana Avery/Released)
SOUTH CHINA SEA (Oct. 5, 2012) Quartermaster Seaman Jason SchutzmQuartermaster Seaman Jason Schutzman (left) and Chief Quartermaster Jory Mason, an inspector with Afloat Training Group Western Pacific, review flag signal cards prior to a flag hoist drill during the final evaluation period aboard the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) in the South China Sea, Oct. 5, 2012.. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Tatiana Avery/Released)an, from Pittsburgh, left, and Chief Quartermaster Jory Mason, from Chicago, an inspector with Afloat Training Group Western Pacific, review flag signal cards prior to a flag hoist drill during the final evaluation period aboard the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Tatiana Avery/Released)

Lynnette N.:

“My chief was my father. … He taught me to stand up for myself and for what I believe. He taught me dedication, a work ethic and pride in a job well done because he served for 22 years. He remained true to the oath he took from the day he enlisted until the day he died. He showed me what it means to be an American and to honor all who serve to protect the freedoms we enjoy as Americans.”

Chief Boatswain's Mate Sorrells Claiborne (left) teaches Boatswain's Mate 3rd Class Charlesa Anderson how to signal while training her as a rig captain aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) during a replenishment at sea in the Arabian Sea, Jan. 13, 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman George M. Bell/Released)
Chief Boatswain’s Mate Sorrells Claiborne (left) teaches Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Charlesa Anderson how to signal while training her as a rig captain aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) during a replenishment at sea in the Arabian Sea, Jan. 13, 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman George M. Bell/Released)

William G.:

“My chiefs taught me to always take responsibility for my actions and lead from the front. The old goats said I’d see chiefs and E7, 8, 9 who never would be a chief only a pay grade. Those were the ones only out for themselves and cared little about their troops. I like to think I was a chief and never forgot where I came from. Shined lots of brass and scrubbed many a deck plate with my BTs as chief. Thanks to them I had a great 27 years.”

Chief Operations Specialist Jaqueline Renteria stands watch in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in Norfolk, Jan. 10, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Zach Sleeper/Released)
Chief Operations Specialist Jaqueline Renteria stands watch in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in Norfolk, Jan. 10, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Zach Sleeper/Released)

T.j. V.:

“Gotta give a huge shout out to one of the best men, best influences, most respected and one of the greatest mentors I have ever had my entire Navy career MMC Walker. Happy birthday chief! And thank you for everything you did for me while I served alongside of you. And if the calling ever came again to serve alongside of you I would proudly do so with no hesitation or questions asked. I will follow you anywhere chief! But mostly thank you and happy birthday!”

Newly-pinned chief petty officers recite the Chief Petty Officer's Pledge in the hangar bay of USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during the ship's chief petty officer pinning ceremony in the Philippine Sea, Sept. 16, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ryan N. McFarlane/Released)
Newly-pinned chief petty officers recite the Chief Petty Officer’s Pledge in the hangar bay of USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during the ship’s chief petty officer pinning ceremony in the Philippine Sea, Sept. 16, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ryan N. McFarlane/Released)

What did your Navy chief teach you about integrity, accountability, initiative and toughness? Tell us in the comments below.

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