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Category Archives: Navy Life

A Message from CNO and Mrs. Gilday on Military Spouse Appreciation Day

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday and Mrs. Linda Gilday thank all military spouses on Military Spouse Appreciation Day.

Shipmates, my wife, Linda, and I wanted to take a moment to say thanks to all military spouses on Military Spouse Appreciation Day.

Let’s take time together to applaud the service, dedication and support of military spouses, and recognize spouses for the daily sacrifices and challenges they overcome, especially now during the Coronavirus.

For the past 25 years, Linda has been a constant source of strength. Despite moving around the world, she has maintained a successful career in both the public and the private sectors, supported me every step of the way, and she’s been an incredible anchor for our family.

Like countless military families around the world, the love, resourcefulness, and support from spouses make a career of naval service worthwhile.

For all the responsibilities military spouses carry, both seen and unseen, a heartfelt thank you. We could not do it without you. We’ll see you in the fleet!

Education and Learning an Operational Imperative

By John Kroger, Chief Learning Officer and Vice Adm. John Nowell, Chief of Naval Personnel

Learning, innovation, and personal and professional development are part of our Naval heritage and continue to be important in enabling the warfighters of today.

Our service is moving forward in recording and recognizing educational and learning achievements in our formal fitness reports to ensure it is viewed as a strategic priority, alongside our ships, aircraft and weapons systems. 

This will give our Navy a warfighting advantage and allow us to thrive and win against any competitor in this rapidly changing and complex global environment.

Education and a commitment to continuous learning is an operational imperative and, through our enhanced talent management processes, we will empower and reward officers who accelerate their intellectual development and improve their performance through education and learning opportunities.

To support these goals, and in conjunction with MyNavy HR’s efforts to integrate education effectively into Sailor 2025 talent management initiatives, fitness reports (FITREPs) will include specific comments regarding education, learning, and support for a learning culture. This requirement will allow us to identify, select, and reward those officers who have demonstrated the commitment and ability to learn, as well as those who encourage and support the learning of others, by placing them into positions of influence at the tactical, operational, and strategic levels.

NAVADMIN 137/20, released May 7, brings together key elements of the Navy’s Education for Seapower Strategy 2020 and the MyNavy HR Sailor 2025 initiative to better align and integrate naval education into warfighting development and talent management. From selection boards to detailing, those officers with a proven commitment and ability to learn, and who encourage others to learn, will thrive, and this must be formally documented and considered in Fitness Reports.

As acting Secretary of the Navy James E. McPherson has said, “To deter and outfight potential opponents in a great power competition, our force of professionals is going to have to outthink them, and we can only do that through continual learning and education. Our action today will ensure that our talent management system rewards officers who advance warfighting effectiveness through intellectual development and represents an important milestone as we implement our comprehensive “Education for Seapower Strategy.” 

Education and continuous learning will hold greater value within the modernized and enhanced talent management system – promotion boards, selection processes, and detailing decisions. To enable this, we must have all of the right information available through our performance evaluation system.

According to the message, documentation in FITREPs must include personal achievements in education and learning that contribute to a culture of continuous learning, improved knowledge, and warfighting effectiveness at both the individual and unit level. Education and continuous learning progress, achievements and contributions will also receive greater emphasis during statutory and administrative selection boards.

The value that education and continuous learning brings to our Navy team’s quest to maintain overmatch against any threat is undisputed. It is imperative to document an individual’s commitment to intellectual growth so that our warfighters have a benchmark to strive for in bettering themselves year after year across their career.

BUPERS Instruction 1610.10E reflects the policy changes and provides guidance to reporting seniors regarding the documentation of professional military education, off-duty education, and other educational and learning achievements pursued during a reporting period. Additionally, personal achievement in education and learning, and support of the education and learning efforts of others, will be linked to block 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 performance trait content in existing FITREP assessment criteria.

Additionally, reporting seniors are directed to document all education and learning whether Professional Military Education, Navy, civilian, or unit level education. The reporting senior should also consider the degree to which the member performs self-assessment and improvement, pursues professional development and education, improves current skills and knowledge, and acquires new skills.

Specific examples of continuous learning that should be documented include: resident and non-resident professional military education coursework, professional and academic qualifications and certifications, civilian education coursework, personal reading program that includes (but is not limited to) selections from CNO’s Reading List, participation in discussion groups and military societies, writing in national security or military journals, and involvement in learning through new technologies.

Instructions and guidance on filling out the applicable areas of a FITREP can be found in the message.

As the chief of naval operations detailed in FRAGO 01/2019, our nation expects a Navy ready to fight today and the policy updates announced in NAVADMIN 137/20 actively moves the Navy forward in terms of the modernization and transformation needed to ensure we are ready for tomorrow. We will instill continuous learning behaviors to broaden and deepen warfighting knowledge, which will enable adaptation, improvement, and strengthen mission command to outthink and outfight any adversary. The changes to the FITREP system ensure that we, as a Service, keep sight that learning is the ultimate warfare enabler and intellectual development a critical warfighting capability.

In closing, we hope leaders at all levels see the importance in this change – and support every member of the team’s pursuit to learn, develop, and ultimately become better warfighters.  

“SAIL” More Important than Ever

By Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

Last month, there was a significant decrease in the SAIL referral rate and there is concern that commands are not submitting referrals due to the COVID-19 crisis. Now more than ever, the Navy Suicide Prevention Program is encouraging commands and Suicide Prevention Coordinators (SPCs) to continue submitting SAIL referrals following instances of suicide-related behaviors (SRBs). SAIL services are critical during this crisis and commands must continue to submit referrals. Due to COVID-19 operations, caring contacts have transitioned from in-person contacts to telephonic contacts, but SAIL Case Managers are still standing by to assist Sailors.

Sailors sometimes do not speak up about their feelings of hopelessness or emotional distress prior to an SRB because they fear judgement and other negative perceptions. The Navy created the SAIL Program to provide a support network that assists Sailors in navigating resources. Participation in SAIL initiates a series of caring contacts during the first 90 days after an SRB to ensure the Sailor has ongoing resources and support. SAIL is not therapy and does not replace therapy or the care the Sailor may receive from medical and chaplains. It is risk assessment, safety planning and a link to all the additional resources that Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) offers to support our Sailors.

The SAIL Program launches into action when a command notifies their SPC when an SRB occurs. The SPC then contacts the Navy Suicide Prevention Program, which forwards the Sailor’s information to Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC). CNIC contacts the appropriate FFSC Case Manager, who first reaches out to the command, and then reaches out to the Sailor to offer SAIL. SAIL case managers help Sailors understand, choose and engage with resources they need.  Sailors are empowered to strengthen their coping skills throughout the process.

Although risk factors associated with SRBs do not cause or predict suicide, several relate to social connection:

– Lack of social support and sense of isolation

– Loss of relationship or significant personal loss

– Feeling like a burden to others, helplessness

– Feeling like a burden to others, helplessness

If you hold a leadership position, be sure to actively listen to your Sailors with the intent to understand, not just respond. After someone experiences an SRB, one of the most important things they need is support. Support from leadership is critical at this time. Remaining transparent with others in discussing thoughts of suicide or other forms of self-harm openly promotes help-seeking behavior. Facilitating positive and ongoing dialogue around stress helps empower proactive self-care.

Psychological health is just as critical to readiness as physical health. Feeling connected to others can help reduce the isolation of suicidal thoughts, which often stem from a desire to stop intense pain rather than a desire to die. Leaders at all levels of the Navy contribute to their shipmates’ understanding of resources and command climate. Whether you’re a deckplate leader, front-line supervisor or commander, investing in relationships with your team through mentorship and other forms of social connection helps create an environment where all Sailors feel heard and valued. We all play a part in creating a supportive environment where those who need help have the courage to seek help and feel heard.  

To learn more about the SAIL Program and access additional resources for leaders, visit this website.

If you or someone you know is in need of immediate assistance, the Military Crisis Line is available 24/7.  Call 1-800-273-8255 (Option 1), text 838255 or visit www.militarycrisisline.net for free and confidential support.

Month of the Military Child

Linda Gilday Shares Her Thoughts on the Resilience and Strength of Military Children

By Mrs. Linda Gilday, Wife of Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday


April is Month of the Military Child, and on behalf of my husband Mike, I want to take this opportunity to thank, recognize, and celebrate our military children.

As a mother of two boys, young men now, I understand the challenges and rewards that come with raising children in a Navy household.

Military children face something that other children don’t — deployments, moves, and absences. These experiences force children to become familiar with uncertainty and change. And isn’t that a great skill to carry over into our lives now, as we adjust to different patterns due to the coronavirus?

Today, the need for resilience is more important than ever. To our Navy children, thank you from the bottom of our hearts for doing your part — for the moving, being the new kid in school from time to time, and adapting to the new family routines when your parent is at work or deployed.

Military children, both youth and teenagers, are strong and they set examples for their friends, their neighbors, and their local communities on how to make personal sacrifices in the service of the collective good.

Let’s take time together to celebrate the patriotism, strength, and perseverance of our military children. Let’s applaud their daily sacrifices and the challenges they overcome. Most of all, let’s thank them for their love and support, which makes the life of service to the Navy possible.

We also want to recognize not only the parents who raise the children, but also the Navy child- and healthcare professionals. What you do matters to support Navy children.

To everyone, please join me in recognizing our Navy children and their families, not only this month but all throughout the year.

Thank you very much.

CNO’s Message to the Fleet on Coronavirus

By Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday

Shipmates, it’s the 19th of March, 2020. A lot has changed in the past week, and the impacts of the coronavirus are changing daily life for all of us.

Our focus right now is threefold: We must protect our people, and we must maintain mission readiness. And finally, we have to support the whole-of-government effort.

That is why we’ve enacted additional policies designed to combat the spread of coronavirus.  

We’ve done a number of things, including moving to shift work, reducing our manning, and increasing our telework. We have closed DoD schools and many MWR facilities, as well as curtailed some child and youth programs. We have postponed our E-4 advancement exam, we’ve suspended the spring physical readiness test, and we’ve postponed drill weekends for reserves until May 11. We’ve also suspended recruit graduation ceremonies until further notice. Additionally, we will pause administrative and statutory promotion boards for the time being.

But many things remain open too, including our commissaries, our exchanges, our military treatment facilities, as well as our Military Health System Nurse Advice Line and our My Navy Career Center—all available 24/7 to answer your questions. 

We are also preparing our two 1,000-bed hospital ships, the Mercy and Comfort, to get underway to relieve pressure on civilian health providers, who are focused on treating folks with the coronavirus.

Operationally, to keep our ships, our aircraft and our submarines ready, commanders are empowered to take the necessary precautions, so they can effectively carry out their missions and meet the critical needs of our Sailors.

While 30 percent of our fleet is underway today—including four carrier strike groups and four amphibious ready groups—we must, to the greatest extent possible, practice social distancing, as well as good hygiene and cleanliness aboard our ships, in our offices, and in our homes.

America continues to depend on us to provide security and stability to this nation, and we will do just that.

Expect additional guidance over the days and weeks ahead as this situation continues to change. To stay up-to-date on these changes, check out our coronavirus page on Navy.mil. 

Finally, we must be mindful that while many of our shipmates are very adept at maintaining their support networks, for some, social distancing can lead to a loss of connectedness and feelings of isolation. You need to know that you’re not alone. 

If you or if one of your shipmates need help, reach out to the resources that we have available, whether it’s the Military Crisis Line, Military OneSource, our Navy chaplain care, or the Psychological Health Resource Center. We also have our Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center and our Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society.

Above all, take care of yourselves, your families, and each other. Your safety remains our primary concern as we continue to carry out the Navy’s mission in defense of our nation.

A New Era of Enlisted Education

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith
Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Troy Black

One of the biggest challenges and greatest responsibilities for the Department of the Navy today is getting you — America’s Sailors and Marines — ready for the next fight. The war of the future will likely happen in this generation and it’s not going to resemble what we’ve fought in the last 18 years.

It’s imperative for all of you to be experts in your skill sets and have the mental dexterity to operate in combat environments, so that under high stress in the middle of the night when chaos ensues, you’ll be more capable of taking decisive action to save each other and prevail in combat.

For this reason the Department of the Navy’s 2018 Education for Seapower study could not have come along at a better time, recognizing that tough training combined with the broadened intellectual capability of our Navy and Marine Corps team imbued with a passion for continuous learning will be our foundation. This study fundamentally transformed how we think about and prioritize enlisted education in the naval services by allowing you to focus on your job, while capturing credit for skills learned and performed; confidently helping you achieve your education goals by quantifying the work you’re already doing to cultivate in an accredited associates degree.  

200304-N-PM193-1001 WASHINGTON (March 4, 2020) Graphic created using multiple image sources, photo editing software, and digital design tools to create an infographic highlighting the U.S. Naval Community College. Initial testing of operating capabilities and partnerships are to begin in early 2021. (U.S. Navy Graphic by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alexander C. Kubitza)

To that end, former Secretary Richard Spencer and Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly’s top priority was to create a United States Naval Community College for enlisted Sailors and Marines — an exciting demonstration of our commitment to you. The USNCC provides enlisted personnel from every background an unprecedented opportunity to learn and professionally grow throughout the course of their career.

The USNCC will kick off a pilot program in January 2021 for approximately 500 Sailors, Marines and DON civilians in the information technology and engineering fields.

In partnership with public and private colleges and universities, USNCC intends to offer a select number associate of science and associate of art degrees in fields directly related to the warfighting needs of the Navy and Marine Corps, all at no cost to you — the service member. The opportunity to pursue and even complete an associate’s degree at the beginning of your career will also be transferable to any of our partnered education institutions to further degree programs or certifications.

The USNCC will kick off a pilot program in January 2021 for approximately 500 Sailors, Marines and DON civilians in the information technology and engineering fields. By the end of 2022, USNCC will have more than 5,000 students enrolled and by the end of 2025, every newly accessed Sailor and Marine will automatically be enrolled, which will guide you throughout your military career and beyond.

The tuition assistance program will remain so you can continue your path of learning and pursuing personal growth.

College and a lifelong dedication to learning is incredibly important. Continuous learning helps to develop critical thinking skills, which makes us better Sailors and Marines, better leaders, and ultimately better citizens. The path of military service is a difficult one, education should enhance your role in our national security as well as enable your future goals. The United States Naval Community College will no doubt advance our fleet performance, provide warfighting advantages and ensure that the development of enlisted Navy and Marine leaders remains a critical warfighting capability for our national defense.

191016-N-YG104-0004 WASHINGTON (Oct. 16, 2019) Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps (SMMC) Troy E. Black and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Russell Smith pose for a photo. SMMC and MCPON met to discuss naval integration and partnership across the Navy-Marine Corps team. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Sarah Villegas)

MyNavy HR – Serving Sailors 24/7

If you’re seeking information on your career, pay grades and health or policy concerning family, reserves and veterans, you can find it here.

We compile personnel and policy announcements being made during 2020 to help Sailors and their families.

Go to All Hands Magazine online for information on the Navy’s culture and heritage, and feature information for Sailors.

For your mobile phone and tablet, check out the latest editions of the Navy App Locker where you can find information on uniform regulations, education, fitness and more.

Click the categories below for announcements presented in reverse chronological order.

CAREER

CIVILIANS

EDUCATION/TRAINING

EXAMS

HEALTH

PERFORMANCE/PROMOTION

RELOCATION

RESERVES/VETERANS

SPOUSES/FAMILY

TECH TOOLS

UNIFORMS

FINANCIAL/BENEFITS

Follow this page for updates.

CAREER

16-year-mark Cap Removed from GI-Bill Transferability Policy (Jan. 10, 2020)

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Sailors who are serving beyond 16 years and meet service-commitment eligibility criteria now retain the option to transfer GI Bill benefits to dependents as outlined in NAVADMIN 006/20 announced Jan. 10. Read more on Navy.mil

Navy Announces New Legalman Conversion Opportunities (Jan. 9, 2020)

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Beginning in 2020, the Navy’s Legalman (LN) community is expanding career opportunities for Sailors interested in cross-rating. Read more on Navy.mil


PERFORMANCE/PROMOTION

MyNavy HR Announces MAP will Remain at 20% of Total Advancement Opportunity in 2020 (Jan. 9, 2020)

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Top-performing junior Sailors will continue to have the opportunity to be promoted to the next rank under the Meritorious Advancement Program (MAP), as outlined in NAVADMIN 005/20. Read more on Navy.mil


RESERVES/VETERANS

Navy Reserve Announces One-Stop Shop for Reserve Order Opportunities (Jan. 28, 2020)

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) — Commander, Navy Reserve Forces Command (CNRFC) announces the release of ZipServe, a new application that allows Reservists to apply for all Reserve order opportunities. Read more on Navy.mil


TECH TOOLS

Sailors Can Access MyNavy Portal Without Common Access Card (Feb. 3, 2020)

ARLINGTON, Va. (NNS) — Sailors have been asking for it and today the Navy delivered! Sailors can now access MyNavy Portal (MNP) from their personal mobile devices using their mobile web browser without a CAC. Read more on Navy.mil


UNIFORMS

Navy Announces Institution of Surface Warfare Officer Leather Jacket (Jan. 9, 2020)

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) qualified officers can now stand bridge watches in a soon-to-be issued leather jacket per NAVADMIN 004/20 released Jan. 9. Read more on Navy.mil

Best Job I’ve Ever Had

(New Year’s Day 2020 Deck Log Entry)

By Quartermaster 3rd Class Sara Nevison,
Deployed at Sea on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)

NOTE: The New Year’s Day deck log is a longstanding U.S. Navy tradition, in which a Sailor on watch pens his or her reflections in verse, which the watch stander on duty at midnight then enters into the deck log. For more on this tradition, see this article from Naval History and Heritage Command.

As another year comes to an end,
Sailors reflect on the past
And how it all began.

COMPTUEX was the first chapter
Of our long extended adventure.
Countless Surprise GQs and neverending
EMCON conditions
Were the ship’s main ambition.

But together through it all
All the Sailors stood tall
With acceptance of the fate
The ship was soon going to face.

‘Twas the night before deployment,
And all through the base,
Every Lincoln Sailor packing
Their sea bags and suitcase.
Saying goodbye to families
Because it’s the last day.

6th Fleet was our first stop.
Palma De Mallorca, Spain,
Made our mouths drop.
Such a beautiful place to see—
We wondered what the next port would be.

Duqm 1, Duqm 2, Duqm 3,
Arabian Sea.
Swim call, swim call—
Happy birthday, USS Abraham Lincoln!
The water is welcome to all.

Six short blasts are sounded:
Man overboard man overboard!
The chem light bandit still isn’t found yet.
Extensions upon extensions—
The ship was very much needed.
Missing holidays with family
Everyone felt defeated.

Good morning, Lincoln Nation!
We finally got some information.
We are headed to 7th Fleet,
But first we to clean
Your filthy pollywog feet.

We crossed the equator
And to become a shellback was in favor.
Covered in green slime
And drenched in saltwater of course,
We were accepted into King Neptune’s Court.

As we start off a new year,
Lincoln Sailors are in joy and glee
To what we leave behind in 2019.
Lots of memories and lots of fun,
But what comes next in 2020 has begun.

200101-N-ME568-1001 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 1, 2020) Quartermaster 3rd Class Ryan Gouger, from Newberg, Ore., enters the ship’s coordinates in the ship’s position log while standing Quartermaster of the Watch on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dan Snow/Released)
200101-N-ME568-1003 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 1, 2020) Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Kayla Whitcomb, from Springfield, Ill., rings in the new year with 16 bells while standing Boatswain’s Mate of the Watch on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dan Snow/Released)

Best Job I’ve Ever Had

(New Year’s Day 2020 Deck Log Entry)

By Quartermaster 3rd Class Sara Nevison,
Deployed at Sea on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)

NOTE: The New Year’s Day deck log is a longstanding U.S. Navy tradition, in which a Sailor on watch pens his or her reflections in verse, which the watch stander on duty at midnight then enters into the deck log. For more on this tradition, see this article from Naval History and Heritage Command.

As another year comes to an end,
Sailors reflect on the past
And how it all began.

COMPTUEX was the first chapter
Of our long extended adventure.
Countless Surprise GQs and neverending
EMCON conditions
Were the ship’s main ambition.

But together through it all
All the Sailors stood tall
With acceptance of the fate
The ship was soon going to face.

‘Twas the night before deployment,
And all through the base,
Every Lincoln Sailor packing
Their sea bags and suitcase.
Saying goodbye to families
Because it’s the last day.

6th Fleet was our first stop.
Palma De Mallorca, Spain,
Made our mouths drop.
Such a beautiful place to see—
We wondered what the next port would be.

Duqm 1, Duqm 2, Duqm 3,
Arabian Sea.
Swim call, swim call—
Happy birthday, USS Abraham Lincoln!
The water is welcome to all.

Six short blasts are sounded:
Man overboard man overboard!
The chem light bandit still isn’t found yet.
Extensions upon extensions—
The ship was very much needed.
Missing holidays with family
Everyone felt defeated.

Good morning, Lincoln Nation!
We finally got some information.
We are headed to 7th Fleet,
But first we to clean
Your filthy pollywog feet.

We crossed the equator
And to become a shellback was in favor.
Covered in green slime
And drenched in saltwater of course,
We were accepted into King Neptune’s Court.

As we start off a new year,
Lincoln Sailors are in joy and glee
To what we leave behind in 2019.
Lots of memories and lots of fun,
But what comes next in 2020 has begun.

200101-N-ME568-1001 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 1, 2020) Quartermaster 3rd Class Ryan Gouger, from Newberg, Ore., enters the ship’s coordinates in the ship’s position log while standing Quartermaster of the Watch on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dan Snow/Released)
200101-N-ME568-1003 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 1, 2020) Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Kayla Whitcomb, from Springfield, Ill., rings in the new year with 16 bells while standing Boatswain’s Mate of the Watch on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dan Snow/Released)

CNO Message to the Force: We must be protectors and exemplify our values

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday

Mission one for every Sailor — active and reserve, uniformed and civilian — is the operational readiness of today’s Navy. That means being ready both in our personal and professional lives — and part of that readiness is continuing to hold ourselves to high ideals of integrity and service.

Reflecting on my first three months as chief of naval operations, I want each and every Sailor to think about who we are as a Navy and the constitutional oath we commit ourselves to. That oath is what binds us together. It is the foundation of our profession. It is our north star. It defines us.

It is no overstatement to say that naval service requires deeper and broader knowledge than it ever has before. You must summon all your energy to ensure that we are ready to fight today; not tomorrow, not in some distant future but today. That all starts with good order and discipline at every level of the chain of command. 

To be clear, we must be men and women of integrity. We must be honorable. We must be standard-bearers. We must be above reproach. And we must not give anyone cause to question our fundamental values. That is what sets us apart as a fighting force. 

Leaders, I am counting on you. I expect commanders at every level to epitomize integrity and exemplify our core values at all times. Senior enlisted leaders, I expect you to anchor up and show your Sailors what right looks like on the deck-plates, day-in and day-out. And I expect every Sailor to display the character and honor that has always defined our Navy. These ideals are central to who we are.

The responsibility for ethical and professional behavior must be taken seriously — and we must own it at every level. We must be protectors and exemplify our values.

I’m counting on each of you to set a strong personal example of responsible behavior, both on and off duty.

While there is much work to be done, the tenacity and ingenuity of our Sailors will take us where we need to go — and do so at a flank bell. 

See you in the fleet.