Category: Navy Life

CNO Releases Navy Family Framework Version 2.0

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John M. Richardson released Version 2.0 of the Navy Family Framework on August 14th as part of a continuous effort to reinforce the Navy’s commitment to families.

Navy Family Framework Version 2.0 is an update to Navy Family Framework Version 1.0, released in November 2017. Based on feedback from the fleet through online forums, in-person focus groups, and surveys, Version 2.0 sets new goals in light of the progress made since Version 1.0 was released.

The Navy will continue improving its commitment to families through future assessments, feedback, progress, and goal setting.

Check out the video below for a message from CNO and his wife, Mrs. Dana Richardson, on what to expect when you read Navy Family Framework Version 2.0.

Congratulations, CPO Selects; Now Earn This

Congratulations to all those selected for advancement to Chief Petty Officer. This is our most important milestone achievement in enlisted advancement, and you should be incredibly proud of all you have accomplished.

Chief Petty Officer Selection Results

The Navy you have grown up in will look very different to you six weeks from now — what you’ve done to demonstrate your readiness for this responsibility will be different from how you apply your skills as a member of the Chief’s Mess. Take some time to reflect on all who have had a hand in raising you to be the outstanding leaders you have become — everyone who has ever advocated for you, empowered you, trained, taught or developed you put you in this position, at the precipice of a new way of life. In moments of difficulty, someone put an arm around your shoulder and reinforced your confidence; in moments of sadness, someone consoled you; in moments of great achievement, someone celebrated with you, because no one succeeds alone – you led your team to victory. The investment in you is almost immeasurable, as it is too great to be captured in terms of dollars and cents or a simple quantification of time. Recognizing that is important, because it highlights your sacred duty to learn how the Chief’s Mess operates, how we transcend the sum of our parts to make the Navy better as a whole — to network and share, and to build winning teams so that we prevail in combat.

Over the next several weeks you will be elated, and you will be saddened and frustrated — you will experience the immense joy of success, and the desolate pain of failure.  All of these will build you, will make you stronger, and are required of our cadre of senior technical experts who make the Navy run. Chief Petty Officer Initiation is a refined syllabus of comprehensive and thoughtful events, constructed and woven together to carefully transform our top performing First Class Petty Officers into basically-trained Chief Petty Officers. You will learn to better and more thoroughly evaluate problems, make difficult decisions more easily, share difficult news and speak truth to power more readily and, most importantly, build teams ready to fight and win in combat. 

Laying the Keel 2.0

This is not the beginning of the end; it is the end of the beginning.  You will learn and grow — as you already have — for the remainder of your time in the Navy. Including my own, this is my 21st CPO Initiation, and I still learn something every day. You are not in this alone; the roughly 36,000 active duty and reserve Chief Petty Officers, supported by nearly 500,000 living veterans of the Navy who are also duly initiated members of the Mess, are all emotionally invested in bringing you into the Mess the right way. We will set the bar for you and clearly delineate the high standards required for you as a member of the Mess. I am confident that you will rise to the occasion and demonstrate to the Chiefs that you are ready, and on that day I look forward to clasping your hand and welcoming you as a brother or sister in arms.  

My charge to you is that you go into this training “all-in.” The debt you are about to incur to the Chiefs who will finish your initial training, along with all of those mentioned above that contributed to your success, is a debt that can never be repaid. You must seize this new and exciting opportunity to lead — and forever strive to “earn this.”   

Congratulations!

– MCPON Russell Smith

2019 Personnel and Policy Changes

Whether you’re looking for your next billet, upcoming exam requirements or you’re curious if you can apply pay grades or just wondering about policy concerning family needs, this blog is for you.

We’re compiling personnel and policy announcements made during 2019 to help Sailors and their families find important career information.

Go to All Hands Magazine online for information on the Navy’s culture and heritage, and feature information for Sailors.

For your mobile phone and tablet, check out the latest editions of the Navy App Locker where you can find information on uniform regulations, education, fitness and more.

Click the categories below for announcements presented in reverse chronological order.

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CAREER

CIVILIANS

EDUCATION

EXAMS

HEALTH

PERFORMANCE

RELOCATION

RESERVES

SPOUSES/FAMILY

TECH TOOLS

UNIFORMS

 

Follow this page for updates.

CAREER

Navy Announces FY20 Senior Enlisted Advancement-to-Position Selection Board

MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) — Active duty senior enlisted Sailors looking for their next billet in a higher paygrade will soon have the opportunity to get a jump on the process thanks to the Advancement-to-Position (A2P) selection board, the Navy announced July 17. Read more on Navy.mil

Navy Accepts Continuous Applications for Enlisted Women in Submarines

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy is now continuously accepting applications for female enlisted Sailors in pay grades E1-E8 to convert to Submarine Force non-nuclear trained ratings, as announced in NAVADMIN 159/19, July 15. Read more on Navy.mil

Do You Want to be a Career Recruiter?

MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) — The Navy announced the convening of the Career Recruiter Force (CRF) selection board to allow select enlisted Sailors to serve as Navy recruiters in NAVADMIN 139/19, June 25. Read more on Navy.mil

Navy Launches Advancement-to-Position Program

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Navy announced the creation of a program with an advancement incentive to fill priority recruiter and recruit division commander (RDC) billets June 3, in NAVADMIN 122/19. Read more on Navy.mil

Meritorious Advancement Program Gains a Season, Quotas Increase

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy released the calendar year (CY) 2019 Meritorious Advancement Program (MAP) plan, Feb. 8, in NAVADMIN 031/19, announcing the transition from one to two MAP seasons and increasing quotas in a continuing effort to empower command triads to recognize their most highly-talented Sailors through immediate advancement. Read more on Navy.mil

FY19-20 Tours with Industry Applicants Sought

MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) — Navy announced Feb. 7 that select Sailors can apply to participate in the Secretary of the Navy Tours with Industry (SNTWI) program. Read more on Navy.mil

No Ordinary Day, Flag Writers Get the Job Done

There are speeches to write, naval correspondence on your desk to be edited and travel plans to be scheduled. Days are a balancing act between meticulously scheduled events and last-minute changes, but no day is ever the same as the one before. It’s a fast-paced environment at times, but you have what it takes. Why? Because you are a Navy flag writer. Read more on Navy.mil

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CIVILIANS

U.S. Fleet Forces Command Kicks Off Navy Civilian Acculturation Program

NORFOLK (NNS) — The Chief of Navy Operations (CNO) announced the rollout of the Navy Civilian Acculturation Program (NCAP) in NAVADMIN 158/19 July 15, providing details of a new orientation program that is now available for newly hired civilians with no prior experience or background in the Navy. NCAP is designed to provide the Navy’s newest employees exposure and familiarization to naval culture to enable them to better integrate into the organization. Read more on Navy.mil

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EDUCATION

Post-9/11 GI Bill Education Benefits Transfer Deadline Extended for Members with 16 Years of Service

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The deadline for Sailors who have over 16 years of service to transfer their Post-9/11 GI Bill education benefits to dependents has been extended to Jan. 12, 2020 based on recently revised guidance issued by the Department of Defense (DoD). Read more on Navy.mil

Navy Implements Change to Education Program Announcements

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy announced that education program information, application processes and deadlines will be announced through personalized notifications to eligible Sailors in NAVADMIN 106/19, May 10. Read more on Navy.mil

Department of the Navy Announces New Education Initiatives

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Department of the Navy (DoN) released its Education for Seapower report Feb. 12, along with the Secretary of the Navy’s action memorandum providing the way forward for the new education initiatives for the department. Read more on Navy.mil

DoD Announces Post-9/11 GI Bill Education Benefits Transfer Exception

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Department of Defense (DoD) has granted a temporary exception to policy to allow select service members to transfer their Post-9/11 GI Bill education benefits to dependents until July 12, 2019. Read more on Navy.mil

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EXAMS

More Ways to Complete Professional Military Knowledge Eligibility Exam

PENSACOLA, Fla. (NNS) — Sailors eligible for advancement to paygrades E-4/5/6/7 can now complete their Professional Military Knowledge Eligibility Exam (PMK-EE) requirements anytime, anywhere in the world, through a self-service app announced in NAVADMIN 140/19, June 26. Read more on Navy.mil

Mobile App Lets Sailors Prepare for and Take Advancement Exams

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy’s Professional Military Knowledge Eligibility Exam (PMK-EE) mobile application conveniently allows Sailors to prepare for and complete these exams, which they must pass to advance through the E4/5/6/7 paygrades. Read more on Navy.mil

Going Digital: MyNavy Portal Introduces Advancement Dashboard for Enlisted Sailors

WASHINGTON (NNS) — It just got a lot easier for Sailors preparing for the Navy-wide Advancement Exam (NWAE) with the roll-out of the Advancement Dashboard on MyNavy Portal (MNP), March 8. Read more on Navy.mil

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HEALTH

Navy Announces Expansion of Urinalysis Testing Program

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Navy announced that the Department of Defense has expanded its ability to conduct random drug testing for manufactured opiate drugs June 3, in NAVADMIN 125/19. Read more on Navy.mil

Navy Announces Universal Training Precautions for Physical Exercise

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Navy released NAVADMIN 108/19, May 10, alerting Sailors and command leadership of the importance of universal training precautions (UTP) to reduce the risk of exercise-related collapse and death during physical exercise, to include the Physical Readiness Test (PRT) and command physical training. Read more on Navy.mil

Navy Updates Medical Waiver Process

FALLS CHURCH, Va. (NNS) — U.S. Navy surgeon general Vice Adm. Forrest Faison, on behalf of the Department of the Navy (DoN), instituted a new policy regarding the medical waiver process. The changes were officially signed Feb. 15, and impacts all applicants, with greater emphasis on enlisted to officer commissioning programs. Read more on Navy.mil

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PERFORMANCE

June 2019 SRB and Pay for Performance Pilot Update Announced

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy updated the Selective Reenlistment Bonus (SRB) award plan for Active Component and Full Time Support Sailors and announced the continuation of an incentivized performance program in NAVADMIN 129/19, released June 11. Read more on Navy.mil

Enlisted Supervisor Retention Pay Update Announced

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy updated Enlisted Supervisor Retention Pay (ESRP) award levels for senior active-duty nuclear-trained Sailors in NAVADMIN 085/19, released April 8. Read more on Navy.mil

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RELOCATION

Navy Modernizing PCS Move Process

MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) — Continuing efforts to improve the Permanent Change of Station (PCS) experience for Sailors and their families, the Navy is launching the MyPCS Mobile app July 17. Read more on Navy.mil

Navy Announces Spouse Licensure and Certification Reimbursement Policy

WASHINGTON (NNS) — As part of ongoing Navy Family Framework efforts to expand and improve the experience for spouses, Navy announced Sailors may be reimbursed up to 500 dollars for state licensure and certification costs of a spouse arising from relocation to another state due to a permanent change of station (PCS) move in NAVADMIN 134/19, June 24. Read more on Navy.mil

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RESERVES

Navy Updates Mobilization Deferment Policy for Selected Reserve Affiliation

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy announced updates to the mobilization deferment policy for Sailors and veterans of other military services who choose to affiliate with the Selected Reserve (SELRES) in NAVADMIN 145/19, July 1. Read more on Navy.mil

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SPOUSES/FAMILY

Navy Announces Spouse Licensure and Certification Reimbursement Policy

WASHINGTON (NNS) — As part of ongoing Navy Family Framework efforts to expand and improve the experience for spouses, Navy announced Sailors may be reimbursed up to 500 dollars for state licensure and certification costs of a spouse arising from relocation to another state due to a permanent change of station (PCS) move in NAVADMIN 134/19, June 24. Read more on Navy.mil

Service Secretaries Tackle Employment Challenges for Overseas Spouses

WASHINGTON (NNS) — All three military service secretaries signed a memorandum today to jointly explore how military spouses can find employment and sustain careers at overseas bases. Read more on Navy.mil

MyNavy Family App Focuses on Stronger Families and Fleet

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Navy families navigating military life can now find support by downloading the MyNavy Family application which was released in the days leading up to Military Spouse Appreciation Day, May 10. The free app can be found in the Navy App Locker, https://applocker.navy.mil. Read more on Navy.mil

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TECH TOOLS

New Uniform Mobile App Has New Name, Guidance

ARLINGTON, Va. (NNS) — One of the more popular mobile applications the Navy has is the OPNAV Uniform Regulations app released in October 2017. Just like your worn out uniforms, the app needed updated. With a new name and more information, the OPNAV Uniform Regulations is now MyNavy UNIFORMS which hit app stores, July 18. Read more on Navy.mil

MyNavy Family App Offers One-Stop Shop for Various Needs

WASHINGTON (NNS) — From military installation searches to special family needs, relocation and retirement, the MyNavy Family mobile application is a one-stop shop for Navy spouses and Sailors’ families, combining official information from more than 22 websites. Read more on Navy.mil

Navy Announces Officer Photo Electronic Submission Capability

MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) — Officers now have another way to submit their official photographs to their Official Military Personnel File (OMPF), Navy leaders said May 13. Read more on Navy.mil

CONUS Sailors Have New Leave Scheduling Tool

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy launched an “eLeave” self-service tool capability within MyNavy Portal (MNP) Jan. 17, which allows CONUS-based Sailors to manage their ordinary leave using MNP. Read more on Navy.mil

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UNIFORMS

New Uniform Mobile App Has New Name, New Guidance

ARLINGTON, Va. (NNS) — One of the more popular mobile applications the Navy has is the OPNAV Uniform Regulations app released in October 2017. Just like your worn out uniforms, the app needed updated. With a new name and more information, the OPNAV Uniform Regulations is now MyNavy UNIFORMS which hit app stores, July 18. Read more on Navy.mil

Navy Uniform Policy Update Announced

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy announced updates to uniform policy, grooming standards, uniform item availability and mandatory possession dates for new uniform items in NAVADMIN 075/19, released March 25. Read more on Navy.mil

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Follow this page for updates.

“The Unsung Heroes of the Warrior Games”

As the 2019 Department of Defense (DoD) Warrior Games started June 21, athletes have been testing their strengths and endurance. A total of 40 Sailors and Coast Guardsmen, who advanced to the DoD level in March as part of the Navy Wounded Warrior–Safe Harbor program, are in the Team Navy.

Behind the scenes, another test takes place; it’s about family, love, care and commitment. The ones who stick together are “The Unsung Heroes of the Warrior Games.”

 

The Warrior Games not only bring the best warriors together to compete; the games also provide support services and resources for their families.

The Warrior Games will conclude June 30 with a closing ceremony.

For the latest news about the DoD Warrior Games, visit dodwarriorgames.com where you can watch games live, and follow the Team Navy on Navy Wounded Warrior–Safe Harbor’s Facebook page.

5 Tips to Develop a Solid Leadership Foundation

By Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Stacey L. Zimmerman, Master-at-Arms 1st Class Jacob A. Widener, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Ann C. Jones and Yeoman 1st Class Paige S. Bosco. 

 

Through Laying the Keel — like the solid backbone of a ship — the Navy seeks to empower future Navy leaders to build a lasting framework for leadership development. To that end, the recent SAILOR 360 inspired Naval Support Activity Mid-South 2019 Leadership Symposium leveraged various experiences, backgrounds, leadership styles and perspectives to help build and strengthen the leadership foundations of those who attended. The two day symposium, hosted by the First Class Petty Officer Association, featured motivating and insightful presentations from various speakers on the first day, and battle stations type events designed to get Sailors to work together to overcome challenges on the second day — promoting trust and teamwork.

From the symposium, here are the top five takeaways to help you develop a solid leadership foundation:

  1. Humility

Remember where you came from. Many times, we forget where we started and it’s important to realize at one point in your career you were a junior Sailor. Learn to practice “Followership.” You need to not only practice it, but also teach it to others. You can’t lead if you don’t know how to follow. Share yourself and your experiences. We are all human and we all make mistakes. Sometimes you will not have all the answers, but someone else might and it’s OK to ask for help. It’s how we learn and it’s a two-way street. As much as you learn from your leaders, your leaders will learn from you.

Seaman Caleb Geffeney poses for a photo in the well deck of the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryre Arciaga/Released)

 

  1. Focus on Team-Building

The biggest thing everyone always talks about: communication. Learn to talk to each other. Don’t be afraid to pick up the phone or look someone in the eye to have an actual conversation. Email and electronic devices have made communication faster, but not necessarily better. We need to talk to each other. If someone is speaking, don’t just pay attention, actively listen to what they are trying to tell you and be receptive to suggestions. Be honest with each other. One of the hardest things you can do is to be honest with your team and peers. Your viewpoint has value; don’t be afraid to express it. It will help build trust within your team.

Camaraderie is real. It’s not about the “I”; it’s about the “WE.” The title or position doesn’t matter; it is about the impact of what you’re doing. Remember that everyone plays a role in the bigger picture.

  1. Diversify Your Perspectives

We all come from different walks of life; we are different people coming from different places, and we have different values. Take advantage of those views and respect them. A different set of eyes on an issue can provide an enormous amount of clarity. Use it and learn from it.

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (March 22, 2019) Sailors applaud after an award was announced at an all hands call on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Steven Edgar/Released)

Challenge yourself and pull yourself out of your comfort zone. You will never grow as a leader if you don’t get comfortable with being uncomfortable. Use every situation as a way to learn and develop yourself. It will help you learn your weak spots. If you want to develop Sailors, you need to develop yourself as well.

  1. Adapt and Overcome

It’s really hard to learn to let go of control. You can’t do everything or control every outcome. Even though the way something was done might not be how you would have done it, you need to realize that if the goal is met and the task is complete, it’s complete.

Sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Grimley (DDG 101) practice firefighting skills and techniques by battling a simulated fire at the Bremerton International Emergency Services Training Center (BIESTC). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Wyatt L. Anthony/Released)

 

Change is rough. No one likes change. But, you can’t stop it. You have to learn to evolve and embrace change. You may not always agree with the change, but don’t reject it because you don’t understand it. Be patient and pause. Take a moment and take a breath. You will not always have all the pieces to the big picture.

Not everything is under your control. Be flexible. Sometimes, things have to play out. Never lower your standards, but learn to adjust your expectations.

  1. Never Give Up

Face it, as a leader you’re not going to get everything right all the time. At some point or another, you will make a mistake and it might feel like the end of the world; it’s not. Good leaders are leaders who take obstacles and turn them into learning experiences. Your keel, the backbone of your foundation as a leader, is constantly evolving. If it’s not working right, and the structure just isn’t what it should be, don’t be afraid to rebuild it.

U.S. Navy Carriers Keep Freedom Safe

This week, Nimitz-class aircraft carriers USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) have been conducting operations around the globe, demonstrating the inherent capacity of the aircraft carrier and embarked Carrier Air Wing.

U.S. Navy aircraft carriers maintain unmatched responsiveness, flexibility, and mobility as well as the unique ability to operate forward, far away from American shores, unconstrained by the need to refuel. The nuclear-powered ship provides extra capacity for aircraft fuel, armament, and additional warfighting capability — a growth margin for future technology in shipboard warfighting systems and advanced aircraft. This asymmetric advantage grants us access to maritime domains that no other country can influence across the full range of military options. Check more details below:

Article: USS John C. Stennis Arrives in Norfolk (May 16, 2019)

Blog: John C. Stennis Joins the Norfolk CVN Family (May 15, 2019)

In the fall of 2018, quietly and with a purpose, USS John C. Stennis departed Bremerton, Washington, with little notice and less fanfare… Not an easy task for 100,000 tons of steel. —  Rear Adm. Roy Kelley

NORFOLK (May 16, 2019) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) arrives at Naval Station Norfolk, May 16, 2019. John C. Stennis arrived in its new homeport at Naval Station Norfolk, following a deployment to the U.S. 2nd, 3rd, 5th, 6th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility and having conducted a homeport shift from Bremerton, Washington. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Kody A. Phillips/Released)

 

Article: USS Theodore Roosevelt Participates in Exercise Northern Edge 2019 (May 14, 2019)

Article: Exercise Northern Edge 2019 kicks off in Alaska (May 13, 2019)

GULF OF ALASKA (May 14, 2019) An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the “Blue Diamonds” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 146 launches from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) while participating in Exercise Northern Edge 2019. Northern Edge is one in a series of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command exercises in 2019 that prepares joint forces to respond to crisis in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Olympia O. McCoy/Released)

 

Article: Abraham Lincoln Transits Suez Canal (May 9, 2019)

Video: USS Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Completes Southbound Suez Transit (May 9, 2019)

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) and carrier strike group completes a southbound Suez Canal transit.

Video: Flight Operations Aboard USS Abraham Lincoln in the Mediterranean Sea (April 25, 2019)

U.S. Navy F/A-18 Super Hornets launch and recover aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is currently deployed in defense of American forces and interests in the 5th and 6th fleet areas of operation.

 

 

John C. Stennis Joins the Norfolk CVN Family

By Rear Adm. Roy Kelley
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

In the fall of 2018, quietly and with a purpose, USS John C. Stennis departed Bremerton, Washington, with little notice and less fanfare… Not an easy task for 100,000 tons of steel. This is the latest example of how the Navy is supporting the National Defense Strategy through dynamic, unpredictable operations.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 22, 2019) Sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Preble (DDG 88) let out the sound powered phone line during a breakaway after a replenishment-at-sea with the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) in the Pacific Ocean, Feb. 22, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Bryan Niegel/Released)

 

Make no mistake, the world’s oceans are the forefront of a new great power competition. As our near-peer competitors and adversaries continue to push agendas predicated on global instability, we will do what we do best – operate as the world’s most maneuverable and lethal maritime force. And, we will do it as the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group (CSG) has done over the last seven months – anytime, anywhere.

Throughout the Third, Seventh, Fifth, Sixth and Second Fleets, the men and women of this strike group operated impeccably at the forefront, taking the fight to terror groups, securing vital international shipping lanes, and strengthening a global community of allies and partners. The strike group also flexed the Navy’s ability to conduct high-end, complex warfare, participating in the multinational exercise Intrepid Sentinel as well as integrating with the Essex Amphibious Readiness Group, the French Navy flag ship Charles De Gaulle, and the Ronald Reagan and Abraham Lincoln CSGs.

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (April 24, 2019) The aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) steams alongside the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), background, in the Mediterranean Sea, April 24, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Grant G. Grady/Released)

 

Proving their ability to operate seamlessly with various platforms across international boundaries, the strike group also continued the Navy’s tradition of aviation dominance. USS John C. Stennis and embarked Carrier Air Wing NINE amassed 23,592 flight hours, including 2282 hours of combat operations that expended more than 250,000 pounds of ordnance. All this while supporting Operations Inherent Resolve and Freedom’s Sentinel.

And as much as I relish highlighting this team’s combat acumen, they also shined as diplomats.  Through five port visits with key allies and a number of multinational engagements, the strike group continued to foster partnerships that will help ensure global security and stability.

RED SEA (April 18, 2019) Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Christopher Settle, from Columbus, Indiana, directs an EA-18G Growler assigned to Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 133 toward a steam-powered catapult on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) in the Red Sea, April 18, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Skyler Okerman)

 

Across most of the world’s oceans and in ever-changing environments, the Sailors of the John C. Stennis CSG displayed an immense amount of courage and focus. They have truly demonstrated the intrinsic value of the Navy’s most important resource – the men and women in our ranks. This includes our dedicated family members whose strength and support are the catalyst for our success. To family and friends, I sincerely thank you for everything you do.

To the strike group Sailors, Bravo Zulu for your exceptional work. To USS John C. Stennis, welcome to your new home!

 

CNO and MCPON Release Updates to Leadership Guidance

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) John Richardson and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Russell Smith released May 7 their updated leadership guidance documents, Navy Leader Development Framework Version (NLDF) 3.0 and Laying the Keel. The documents have been refreshed with new ideas in support of developing leaders who can sustainably win and bring their teams to a community centered on “best ever” performance.

Check out the video below for a message from CNO and MCPON on what to expect when you read the two new documents. Learn from these documents and connect with your teams on what being a leader means to you and to our Navy.

 

Ethics is a Strategic Imperative for All Hands

By Adm. Bill Moran
Vice Chief of Naval Operations

Historically ethics has often been seen as a legalistic, zero sum determination of compliance with rules and minimum standards. We can — and we must — do better. Working together, we can view ethics for what it truly is: A strategic imperative for all of us, one that shifts our individual and organizational mind-sets from merely doing the thing right (i.e., process compliance) to always doing the right thing (i.e., the alignment of process, purpose, and values).

Fostering a culture that recognizes ethics as a strategic imperative for all hands will require three immediate actions from the team.

1. Officers: Empower down and learn daily from your team.

U.S. Navy Capt. Murz Morris, commodore of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 21, speaks to Sailors during an all-hands call aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) in the Indian Ocean, Dec. 6, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Logan C. Kellums/Released)

Most problems are best solved in the work spaces of your respective commands rather than here in Washington, D.C. Believe in your Sailors’ ingenuity, intellect and courage to innovate. Working closely at every step with your Chiefs Mess, you must earn, protect, and reciprocate your Sailors’ trust and confidence by making the deck plates our laboratory for new ideas and creative solutions.

Encourage your people to take smart, calculated, and measured risks to raise standards of performance and professionalism. Sailors want you to value their input and be open to positive feedback. Be comfortable with respectful and constructive confrontation, trust your teams, and mission accomplishment will follow.

2. Chiefs and Lead Petty Officers: Promote a culture of open communication and continual feedback.

Rear Adm. Edward Cashman speaks to the Chiefs’ Mess aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Gravely (DDG 107), Jan. 3.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Mark Andrew Hays/Released)

Constructive and respectful criticism is a hallmark of naval service. Sailors feel comfortable providing their honest feedback when they are confident that their voice will be heard.

As deck plate leaders and front line supervisors, you know your Sailors best; listen and learn, teach and develop, and recognize and reward your Sailors every single day. Actively invest in their personal and professional development, know them as people (not just Sailors), and enable their success.

3. Junior Sailors: Identify problems, propose solutions and take ownership.

You are smarter, more adaptable, and more innovative than any other generation of Sailors. Focus your immense talents on finding ways to improve your work centers, departments, commands, and our Navy.

Sailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) hold lines steady during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by ENS Sijing Y. Qiu/Released)

Do not fear failure; trust and collaborate creatively with your chain of command to improve, yet humbly recognize that our Navy is one team that must work together to achieve success. Anchored by your honesty and integrity, raise your own standards, so as to raise those of your command and of our entire Navy team.

Transforming ethics into a strategic asset is another step in the continued vitality of our people, our institution, and our purpose. Competing with character by overlaying ethics as a strategic imperative in everything we do will enhance readiness and result in a more lethal force that reflects the American values you protect every single day.

I am excited about the future of our Navy, and proud to serve with you as we confront the uncertainty of tomorrow together. See you in the Fleet!

Welcome Home USS Santa Fe and USS Cheyenne

Two Los Angeles-class fast attack submarines returned to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam from deployment.  USS Santa Fe (SSN 763) returned April 22 and USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) returned April 26.

Read more on Santa Fe’s deployment:  USS Santa Fe Returns from Deployment
A Sailor assigned to the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Santa Fe (SSN 763) greets his family after arriving at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing his latest deployment, April 22, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
A Sailor assigned to Los Angeles-Class fast-attack submarine USS Santa Fe (SSN 763) casts a line as the ship arrives at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, after completing their latest deployment, April 22, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
Sailors assigned to the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Santa Fe (SSN 763) salute as they arrive at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing their latest deployment, April 22, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Santa Fe (SSN 763) and its crew arrive at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing their latest deployment, April 22, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Santa Fe (SSN 763) and its crew arrive at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing their latest deployment, April 22, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
Sailors assigned to the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Santa Fe (SSN 763) handle line as they arrive at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing their latest deployment, April 22, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)

 

Read more on Cheyenne’s deployment:  USS Cheyenne Returns From Deployment
A Sailor assigned to the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) is greeted after arriving at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing his latest deployment, April 26, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) and its crew arrive at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing their latest deployment, April 26, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
A Sailor assigned to the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) casts a line as the boat arrives at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing its latest deployment, April 26, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
Sailors assigned to the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) handle line as the boat arrives at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing its latest deployment, April 26, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)