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Category Archives: CNO

Month of the Military Child

Linda Gilday Shares Her Thoughts on the Resilience and Strength of Military Children

By Mrs. Linda Gilday, Wife of Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday


April is Month of the Military Child, and on behalf of my husband Mike, I want to take this opportunity to thank, recognize, and celebrate our military children.

As a mother of two boys, young men now, I understand the challenges and rewards that come with raising children in a Navy household.

Military children face something that other children don’t — deployments, moves, and absences. These experiences force children to become familiar with uncertainty and change. And isn’t that a great skill to carry over into our lives now, as we adjust to different patterns due to the coronavirus?

Today, the need for resilience is more important than ever. To our Navy children, thank you from the bottom of our hearts for doing your part — for the moving, being the new kid in school from time to time, and adapting to the new family routines when your parent is at work or deployed.

Military children, both youth and teenagers, are strong and they set examples for their friends, their neighbors, and their local communities on how to make personal sacrifices in the service of the collective good.

Let’s take time together to celebrate the patriotism, strength, and perseverance of our military children. Let’s applaud their daily sacrifices and the challenges they overcome. Most of all, let’s thank them for their love and support, which makes the life of service to the Navy possible.

We also want to recognize not only the parents who raise the children, but also the Navy child- and healthcare professionals. What you do matters to support Navy children.

To everyone, please join me in recognizing our Navy children and their families, not only this month but all throughout the year.

Thank you very much.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/04/29/month-of-the-military-child/ U.S. Navy

#NavyWomenMakingHistory – A Message from CNO and Mrs. Gilday

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday and Mrs. Linda Gilday

It’s a busy time with the Coronavirus and stressful as well, but my wife, Linda, and I want to take this opportunity to recognize the countless women who serve in the U.S. Navy – active and reserve, uniform and civilian – as well as those who serve as military spouses on the front lines at home.

These are challenging times right now for all of us, but there is no doubt that women have, and will continue to make history in exciting ways. As March comes to an end, we want to recognize Women’s History Month as well as the amazing work being done by so many. Each of us is making history in some small way right now.

The Navy is full of trailblazers who paved a way for the more than 67,000 women who serve as part of our active force today. These spouses, mothers, daughters, sisters, and coworkers serve in every rank – from seaman to admiral… and in most every job – from naval aviators to deep-sea divers. Right now there are female doctors, nurses, and corpsmen deployed aboard the USNS Mercy and Comfort as part of the Navy’s broader response to the coronavirus epidemic. There are also many women who are acting at home as nurses to their own families.

Thousands of women also serve our Navy team as military spouses, supportive family members, government civilians and reservists. We know the sacrifices you are making and what you bring to the Navy team. While some receive public recognition, many do not. And we encourage ALL Navy leaders to take note of these accomplishments!

To the women who forged ahead and broke through that glass ceiling – thank you.  And to the women who serve selflessly with little fanfare day-in and day-out – we appreciate all that you do.

We all have important roles to play in service to the Navy, and to our Nation. Your work matters – whether it’s at home, in an office or aboard ships at sea… It matters, and we thank you. We also would love to see your amazing stories right now – so join our conversation at: #NavyWomenMakingHistory.
 
We will see you out in the Fleet!
 



 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/03/31/navywomenmakinghistory-a-message-from-cno-and-mrs-gilday/ U.S. Navy

COVID-19 Navy Update: CNO and MCPON Message to the Fleet

CNO: Shipmates, it’s the 30th of March, 2020. MCPON Smith and I wanted to provide you and your families an update on COVID-19. During this extraordinary time, what remains constant are our top three priorities: taking care of you and your families, being mission ready, and supporting the whole-of-government effort.

MCPON:
This past week, we’ve seen a rise in numbers who have tested positive for the coronavirus throughout the Fleet. We continue to take this threat very seriously and are working aggressively to keep Sailors healthy, as well as to prevent further spread of the virus.

CNO: We have to think, act, and operate differently right now to both protect Sailors and to remain mission ready. This is not business as usual. That is why many commanders have implemented a 14-day fast cruise for units preparing to get underway, which will conduct important training evolutions, exercises, or deployments.
 
MCPON: Additionally, we have implemented a 14-day restricted-movement policy for new recruits at RTC. And the entire RTC staff will also remain on base for up to 90 days, to minimize potential spread of the virus.
 
CNO: We are also supporting the whole-of-government approach in many ways. USNS Mercy arrived in Los Angeles last Friday, and USNS Comfort arrived in New York City this morning. We also deployed two expeditionary medical teams: one to Dallas, Texas, and the other to New Orleans.
 
MCPON: 2,200 Navy medical professionals are on board these ships, which will serve as referral hospitals for non-COVID-19 patients. Another 1,000 medical personnel are awaiting orders to be deployed.
 
CNO: In this fight, our Navy medical team is on the front line – fighting to care and treat the American people. Other Sailors from our Reserve and Engineering communities may join the coronavirus fight soon. You all have our thanks and our gratitude.
 
MCPON: People are the lifeblood of the Navy – and we are counting on every Sailor to take this outbreak seriously.

CNO:
While we recognize some new COVID-19 policies place a burden on you and your families, these actions must be taken to ensure your safety and also to maintain mission readiness.

MCPON:
To families and loved ones at home, thank you for your support and understanding. This is a hard time, and we could not do this without you.
 
CNO: I’ll end with this: As military professionals, we prepare daily to deal with adversity, uncertainty and conflict. Our Sailors and their families are resilient. We know you will set an example for your friends, for your neighbors and in your local communities on how to make personal sacrifices in service of the collective good. So stay safe, Shipmates. Americans depend on us for security. And we will not let them down.
 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/03/30/covid-19-navy-update-cno-and-mcpon-message-to-the-fleet/ U.S. Navy

CNO and MCPON Message to the Fleet on Coronavirus

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith

Shipmates, the spread of the coronavirus is something that we are taking very seriously.
 
While many of you may be anxious, worried, or wondering what happens next, leadership at every level is actively engaged on this issue.
 
Our No. 1 concern is the health and the safety of you, our Sailors – active and reserve, uniformed and civilian – as well as your families. We’re suspending official, personal, and PCS travel for the next 60 days both IN-CONUS and to designated locations OCONUS, as well as encouraging flexible work schedules and the use of telework – all designed to slow the virus’ spread.
 
For now, we must use an abundance of caution. Keep an eye on your Sailors and continue to follow the guidelines of health officials – which includes washing your hands more often, avoiding public gatherings, and staying away from others if you’re sick. Don’t be a hero.
 
Our understanding of the coronavirus is rapidly evolving, and we may have to implement further measures to combat the spread of this virus.
 
America depends upon us to help provide security and stability to this nation, and that’s exactly what we will continue to do.
 
Stay safe, Shipmates. Our nation depends on you.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/03/14/cno-and-mcpon-message-to-the-fleet-on-coronavirus/ U.S. Navy

CNO Message to the Force: We must be protectors and exemplify our values

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday

Mission one for every Sailor — active and reserve, uniformed and civilian — is the operational readiness of today’s Navy. That means being ready both in our personal and professional lives — and part of that readiness is continuing to hold ourselves to high ideals of integrity and service.

Reflecting on my first three months as chief of naval operations, I want each and every Sailor to think about who we are as a Navy and the constitutional oath we commit ourselves to. That oath is what binds us together. It is the foundation of our profession. It is our north star. It defines us.

It is no overstatement to say that naval service requires deeper and broader knowledge than it ever has before. You must summon all your energy to ensure that we are ready to fight today; not tomorrow, not in some distant future but today. That all starts with good order and discipline at every level of the chain of command. 

To be clear, we must be men and women of integrity. We must be honorable. We must be standard-bearers. We must be above reproach. And we must not give anyone cause to question our fundamental values. That is what sets us apart as a fighting force. 

Leaders, I am counting on you. I expect commanders at every level to epitomize integrity and exemplify our core values at all times. Senior enlisted leaders, I expect you to anchor up and show your Sailors what right looks like on the deck-plates, day-in and day-out. And I expect every Sailor to display the character and honor that has always defined our Navy. These ideals are central to who we are.

The responsibility for ethical and professional behavior must be taken seriously — and we must own it at every level. We must be protectors and exemplify our values.

I’m counting on each of you to set a strong personal example of responsible behavior, both on and off duty.

While there is much work to be done, the tenacity and ingenuity of our Sailors will take us where we need to go — and do so at a flank bell. 

See you in the fleet.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/12/02/cno-message-to-the-force-we-must-be-protectors-and-exemplify-our-values/ poyrazdogany

The Navy Picked You for a Reason

By Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday

Today, around the Navy and around the world, men and women—Sailors—are making an incredible transition and advancing to Chief Petty Officer. The Navy Memorial is one of our most sacred places, here in Washington, D.C., and today I will stand with a group of Sailors who will receive their anchors. I can’t think of a more fitting place to celebrate such a transformational day.

Over the past six weeks, many Sailors have been challenged, and those challenges were hard but nothing compared to what they will face in the years to come. And that’s ok, because challenge is good. Challenges strengthen us. As I reflect on the critical impact Chiefs have had on my life and career, I am convinced of the importance of the Mess as an institution.

My first Chief told me that our most important weapons system is our Navy Team and their families. People are and will continue to be our key competitive advantage over any adversary. The fact that I am highlighting this enduring principle, 34 years after I first heard it from my Chief, reflects how pivotal Chief Petty Officers have been in my own life and career.

Every time I get the opportunity to reconnect with a group of Chiefs, I leave feeling uplifted and inspired. Those brief times reinforce how important the institution of the Chief Petty Officers’ Mess is to our Navy and our nation.

I use that word institution carefully. When we use it, we often do so to indicate something that has merely been around for a long time. That’s not what I mean today. That usage of the word indicates staleness and complacency, the exact opposite of what the Chiefs’ Mess represents. The original meaning is far better. The word “institution” is the “action of establishing or founding” and under this definition, the institution of the Chiefs’ Mess is not who you are, or the insignia you wear, or the fact that we’ve marked this occasion for many years, but what you do, the actions you take, day-in, and day-out, large and small—that Chiefs routinely undertake to enable our Sailors to perform at their very best.

Even the briefest review of history demonstrates that Chief Petty Officers are Sailors of action. Some of their names, like John Finn, or Oscar Peterson or Peter Tomich—all Chiefs who were awarded the Medal of Honor—are legends in their own right. These examples of valor and of sacrifice are worthy of telling and retelling, but there is something even greater than these individual examples. Our Navy’s achievements throughout our history are due in large measure to the training and mentorship provided by Chief Petty Officers.

Later this year, we’ll commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Leyte Gulf. The line of heroes we look to for inspiration from that series of combat actions is long as well. We will remember Cmdr. Ernest Evans and Lt. Cmdr. Robert Copeland and Gunner’s Mate Third Class Paul Carr. A Chief isn’t in that list, but the Sailors and Officers we lionize from that battle were all trained and mentored by Chief Petty Officers. Those Chiefs would probably tell you that they weren’t looking for credit. They weren’t looking to get their name mentioned by the CNO 75 years later. They were focused on the actions they needed to take to establish the Chiefs’ Mess, to institute the Chiefs’ Mess—every day. They were focused on making our Navy team the most lethal weapons system in our arsenal and they were focused on creating winners – the Sailors and Officers whose actions would cement the U.S. Navy’s combat record and show that our destroyers can fight like battleships as they did at Leyte Gulf.

I sent a letter to all of the Chiefs who just donned their anchors, and I’ve charged them and those who already wear anchors to think about the Chiefs’ Mess as an institution: the sum of the daily acts, both small and large, that continue to challenge us and force us to rise to the standards of those who came before. The actions that will leave our Navy in a better position tomorrow. I also told them that this can’t happen from the physical space of the Mess. They have to be constantly involved in their Sailors’ lives on and off duty.

Chiefs, carrying forward the legacy of those who came before you will test you, and will draw on all the skills, knowledge, and experiences that formed the basis for your selection. The demands you face are tall indeed, and I have high expectations of our Chief Petty Officers, as do the Sailors you serve and lead. However, I am confident that you’ll rise to meet these obligations, making the most of each and every day, leading Sailors and Officers to fulfill the promise of their potential. The challenges we face as a Navy and a nation demand that you do so, as do those who wore anchors before you. We need your best efforts more than ever. I want every Chief in the fleet, new and old, to remember that the Navy not only expects more of you, but demands it—now more than ever. To those of you donning your anchors today, congratulations. You are now the Chief! Thank you for all that you do, and I’ll see you out in the fleet.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/09/18/the-navy-picked-you-for-a-reason/ poyrazdogany

CNO Releases Navy Family Framework Version 2.0

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John M. Richardson released Version 2.0 of the Navy Family Framework on August 14th as part of a continuous effort to reinforce the Navy’s commitment to families.

Navy Family Framework Version 2.0 is an update to Navy Family Framework Version 1.0, released in November 2017. Based on feedback from the fleet through online forums, in-person focus groups, and surveys, Version 2.0 sets new goals in light of the progress made since Version 1.0 was released.

The Navy will continue improving its commitment to families through future assessments, feedback, progress, and goal setting.

Check out the video below for a message from CNO and his wife, Mrs. Dana Richardson, on what to expect when you read Navy Family Framework Version 2.0.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/08/14/cno-releases-navy-family-framework-version-2-0/ poyrazdogany

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson poses for a photo with midshipmen before the Army-Navy football game, Dec. 8, 2018, in Philadelphia, Pa. This is the 119th meeting between the U.S. Naval Academy Midshipmen and the U.S. Military Academy Black Knights. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Elliott Fabrizio/Released)
Sailors rig a barricade during a drill on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Rebekah A. Watkins/Released)
Gunner’s Mate 3rd Class Maxwell Beer, left, fires a 40mm saluting battery during a live-fire exercise aboard Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) while on a regularly scheduled deployment of the Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William Phillips/Released)
Capt. Kevin McLaughlin, commander of Strike Fighter Wing Atlantic, and Cmdr. Patrice Fernandes, the executive officer of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 103, prepare to fly an F/A-18F Super Hornet to the staging location in advance of their upcoming flyover honoring fellow aviator and former President George H.W. Bush. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)
Damage Controlman 2nd Class Mohammed Hasan, assigned to U.S. 7th Fleet Flagship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), helps children take turns manning a fire hose during the ship’s first Family Day Cruise in three years. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Patrick Semales/Released)
Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Branden Lapovsky presents a folded American flag to Carolyn Baker, the next-of-kin of U.S. Navy Molder 1st Class Kenneth B. Armstrong during a funeral at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, Hawaii. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles Oki/Released)
Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) 3rd Class Ryan Vue signals an EA-18G Growler assigned to the Rooks of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 137 ready for launch aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joseph A.D. Phillips/Released)
Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician Alex Kaye, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5, recovers a training drone for a field training exercise at Naval Base Guam. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd class Kory Alsberry/Released)
Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Walter Andrzjewski, left, and Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Brittany Hall stack weapons support equipment for stowage in a storage room aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Victoria Granado/Released)
Quartermaster 1st Class Augustino Suafoa obstructs Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Mark Lee’s vision while he pilots in the San Diego Harbor, Dec. 1, 2018, during a coxswain qualification practical for Navy Reserve Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 1. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Omari K. Way/Released)
Lt. Celine Doerr, right, assigned to the Wildcards of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23, assists a Girl Scout with a flight simulator aboard the aircraft carrier USS Midway Museum. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Julian Davis/Released)
Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Stefani Skiendziel stands watch as the guided-missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) proceeds through the Miraflores Locks while transiting the Panama Canal. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class John Philip Wagner Jr./Released)
Lt.j.g. Sarah Platt, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), mans the lee helm during virtual reality ship handling training at the Navigation, Seamanship and Shiphandling Trainer (NSST), at Naval Base San Diego. Bonhomme Richard collaborated with NSST personnel to sharpen their skills utilizing technological innovations in virtual reality. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Diana Quinlan/Released)
Sailors stand in formation while waiting for the aircraft transporting the remains of former President George H.W. Bush to land at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, Dec. 3, 2018. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Katelyn Strange/Released)
Fire Controlman 3rd Class Hunter Scholl looks through a night vision scope aboard the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) as the ship transits the Suez Canal. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Clay/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/12/12/faces-of-the-fleet-285/ ltall

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson poses for a photo with midshipmen before the Army-Navy football game, Dec. 8, 2018, in Philadelphia, Pa. This is the 119th meeting between the U.S. Naval Academy Midshipmen and the U.S. Military Academy Black Knights. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Elliott Fabrizio/Released)
Sailors rig a barricade during a drill on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Rebekah A. Watkins/Released)
Gunner’s Mate 3rd Class Maxwell Beer, left, fires a 40mm saluting battery during a live-fire exercise aboard Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) while on a regularly scheduled deployment of the Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William Phillips/Released)
Capt. Kevin McLaughlin, commander of Strike Fighter Wing Atlantic, and Cmdr. Patrice Fernandes, the executive officer of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 103, prepare to fly an F/A-18F Super Hornet to the staging location in advance of their upcoming flyover honoring fellow aviator and former President George H.W. Bush. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)
Damage Controlman 2nd Class Mohammed Hasan, assigned to U.S. 7th Fleet Flagship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), helps children take turns manning a fire hose during the ship’s first Family Day Cruise in three years. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Patrick Semales/Released)
Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Branden Lapovsky presents a folded American flag to Carolyn Baker, the next-of-kin of U.S. Navy Molder 1st Class Kenneth B. Armstrong during a funeral at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, Hawaii. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles Oki/Released)
Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) 3rd Class Ryan Vue signals an EA-18G Growler assigned to the Rooks of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 137 ready for launch aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joseph A.D. Phillips/Released)
Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician Alex Kaye, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5, recovers a training drone for a field training exercise at Naval Base Guam. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd class Kory Alsberry/Released)
Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Walter Andrzjewski, left, and Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Brittany Hall stack weapons support equipment for stowage in a storage room aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Victoria Granado/Released)
Quartermaster 1st Class Augustino Suafoa obstructs Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Mark Lee’s vision while he pilots in the San Diego Harbor, Dec. 1, 2018, during a coxswain qualification practical for Navy Reserve Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 1. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Omari K. Way/Released)
Lt. Celine Doerr, right, assigned to the Wildcards of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23, assists a Girl Scout with a flight simulator aboard the aircraft carrier USS Midway Museum. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Julian Davis/Released)
Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Stefani Skiendziel stands watch as the guided-missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) proceeds through the Miraflores Locks while transiting the Panama Canal. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class John Philip Wagner Jr./Released)
Lt.j.g. Sarah Platt, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), mans the lee helm during virtual reality ship handling training at the Navigation, Seamanship and Shiphandling Trainer (NSST), at Naval Base San Diego. Bonhomme Richard collaborated with NSST personnel to sharpen their skills utilizing technological innovations in virtual reality. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Diana Quinlan/Released)
Sailors stand in formation while waiting for the aircraft transporting the remains of former President George H.W. Bush to land at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, Dec. 3, 2018. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Katelyn Strange/Released)
Fire Controlman 3rd Class Hunter Scholl looks through a night vision scope aboard the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) as the ship transits the Suez Canal. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Clay/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/12/12/faces-of-the-fleet-285/ ltall

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

244 Midshipmen chose their first duty assignment during the U.S. Naval Academy’s Ship Selection Night at Alumni Hall. During ship selection, first-class midshipmen assigned to the surface warfare community choose their first ship and homeport. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tyler Caswell/Released)
244 Midshipmen chose their first duty assignment during the U.S. Naval Academy’s Ship Selection Night at Alumni Hall. During ship selection, first-class midshipmen assigned to the surface warfare community choose their first ship and homeport. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tyler Caswell/Released)
Sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) conduct flight operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Released)
Sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) conduct flight operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Released)
Sailors participate in a 'Superhero' 5K run hosted by Morale Welfare and Recreation onboard Naval Station(NAVSTA) Mayport.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael Lopez/Released)
Sailors participate in a ‘Superhero’ 5K run hosted by Morale Welfare and Recreation onboard Naval Station(NAVSTA) Mayport. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael Lopez/Released)
170130-N-PP996-057  PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 30, 2017) Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 2nd Class Jonathan Morel, assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112), uses a radar tracking system to track surface contacts. Michael Murphy is on a western Pacific deployment with the Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group as part of the U.S. Pacific Fleet-led initiative to extend the command and control functions of U.S. 3rd Fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Danny Kelley/Released)
Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 2nd Class Jonathan Morel, assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112), uses a radar tracking system to track surface contacts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Danny Kelley/Released)
Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Landon Hall, left, rescues Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Robert Cox to an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Chargers of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 26 during search and rescue training exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Corbin J. Shea/Released)
Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Landon Hall, left, rescues Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Robert Cox to an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Chargers of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 26 during search and rescue training exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Corbin J. Shea/Released)
Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson meets with Navy Recruiting Command's 2016 Recruiters of the Year at the Pentagon in Arlington, Va. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathan Laird/Released)
Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson meets with Navy Recruiting Command’s 2016 Recruiters of the Year at the Pentagon in Arlington, Va. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathan Laird/Released)
A Sailor assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 2 practices proper freefall technique during military freefall training at a vertical wind tunnel facility in Virginia Beach, Va. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles Oki/Released)
A Sailor assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 2 practices proper freefall technique during military freefall training at a vertical wind tunnel facility in Virginia Beach, Va. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles Oki/Released)
Ensign Christa Ratcliff, from Dallas, stands at parade rest as the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) pulls into Suva, Fiji. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Danny Kelley/Released)
Ensign Christa Ratcliff, from Dallas, stands at parade rest as the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) pulls into Suva, Fiji. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Danny Kelley/Released)
Boatswain's Mate 3rd Class Tim Cutler, attached to the U.S. 7th Fleet flagship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), salutes while standing watch on the ship's barge. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Don Patton/Released)
Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Tim Cutler, attached to the U.S. 7th Fleet flagship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), salutes while standing watch on the ship’s barge. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Don Patton/Released)
Logistics Specialists 2nd Class Shanice Sanders, left, and Laudy Oliverosgarcia review a maintenance checklist aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG 67). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brianna K. Green/Released)
Logistics Specialists 2nd Class Shanice Sanders, left, and Laudy Oliverosgarcia review a maintenance checklist aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG 67). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brianna K. Green/Released)
Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Leo Gonzales, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8), leads a hose team during firefighting training. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Devin M. Langer/Released)
Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Leo Gonzales, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8), leads a hose team during firefighting training. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Devin M. Langer/Released)
Equipment Operators 3rd Class Trae Moliere and Nathan Gillilan, both assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 4, tie down a Humvee aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS San Diego (LPD 22) during a loading exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Rosalie Chang/Released)
Equipment Operators 3rd Class Trae Moliere and Nathan Gillilan, both assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 4, tie down a Humvee aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS San Diego (LPD 22) during a loading exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Rosalie Chang/Released)
Corpsman assigned to the 2nd Medical Battalion secure a patient to a stretcher as part of the Naval Medical Augmentation Program (NMAP) training onboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Ashley Lawson/Released)
Corpsman assigned to the 2nd Medical Battalion secure a patient to a stretcher as part of the Naval Medical Augmentation Program (NMAP) training onboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Ashley Lawson/Released)
Sailors assigned to various regional commands conduct physical training at Gator Beach onboard Naval Base Coronado, Calif. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timothy M. Black/Released)
Sailors assigned to various regional commands conduct physical training at Gator Beach onboard Naval Base Coronado, Calif. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timothy M. Black/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

 

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