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Category Archives: CNO Gilday

Cybersecurity: More than a Buzzword

By Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday

Cybersecurity has my full attention… and it should have yours too.

From personal mobile phone apps to our classified systems, cyber is intertwined with everything we do, both in our professional and personal lives. 

No doubt, cyber has enriched our lives in unimaginable ways. 

But we are also in a cyberfight 24/7, 365-days-a-year, at home and on the job, where the enemy is often unseen. Cyberthreats are all around us and we must be prepared to defend against them.

Information has become the cornerstone of how the Navy functions in the 21st century. Nothing the Navy does, or will do, can exist without it.

October, which is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, should not just be a time to complete our annual cyber training. Rather, we must take time to recognize wherever you are, whatever system you’re operating, every time you log in, you are in a cyberbattle.

We, as a Navy, are also under attack every day. Our adversaries, who are technologically advanced, well-resourced and relentless, are focused on eroding our warfighting advantage by stealing our data, and compromising our networks and systems, including those that control our ships, aircraft, weapons and infrastructure. And they launch full-scale attacks with little or no warning.

Make no mistake. You play an important part in keeping the Navy secure. And we must ensure going forward that our Sailors, civilians, contractors, industry partners, and family members, have a comprehensive understanding of cyberthreats and actions that increase Navy’s cybersecurity readiness.

A successful cyberattack in one part of our network can jeopardize other systems and data because attackers move across the network to other targets once they are inside it – at network speed.

When attackers have this capability, one mistake by an individual can put others at risk. Because these stakes are so high, adhering to cybersecurity policies and best practices requires an “All Hands” approach to keep the Navy and our nation safe.

Throughout the month of October, our N2N6 Team will post resources here. There will be specific information on ways you can protect your home information systems from cyberattacks, and information specific to our cyber professionals.

While the Navy has made strides in our cybersecurity practices, including the creation of four new directorates that work for the Department of the Navy’s Chief Information Officer, there is still more work to be done.

For the Navy to compete, fight and win across the spectrum of our operations – I need you to understand the gravity of the cyberthreats we face. Be vigilant, and know our ability to prevail depends on what you do in cyberspace.

The Navy must dominate the information and cybersphere as we have dominated the maritime environment for the past half-century.

See you in the Fleet.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/10/15/cybersecurity-more-than-a-buzzword/ poyrazdogany

CNO Adm. Gilday: Small Steps Save Lives

By Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday

September is Suicide Prevention Month, and while we should talk about this subject year-round, it is important to me that we have a frank conversation about this right now.

Suicide is a tragedy that extends beyond individual Sailors. Every death by suicide — whether it be uniformed Sailors, Navy Civilians, or families — affects our entire Navy family, and it is extremely troubling to me that suicide continues to be a leading cause of death in our Navy. 

We all go through challenges and stressors that can be difficult to talk about… But no one should feel so isolated or overwhelmed by events that they consider suicide.

That is why it is important that we talk to our shipmates … really talk to them.  Ask them how they’re doing and actively listen. Talking about our challenges, whether they’re operational, social, or psychological, is one small act we can do every day to make all of us better. It fosters a climate of trust and encourages Sailors to ask for help in their time of need. 

We must build that trust up and down the chain of command to ensure Sailors feel comfortable reaching out to their leadership and shipmates. 

Let me be clear. There cannot be BYSTANDERS in our Navy. That is why it’s so important that WE ALL take the time to look for potential warning signs. We need all hands on deck for this.

Right now, in your division, your department or your command, there is someone that needs your help, who is struggling with stress or having thoughts of suicide.

Sometimes the signs are verbal, like a Sailor casually saying that they feel like they have no purpose or feel as though they don’t belong. There may also be behavioral signs, like increased alcohol use or other substance misuse, withdrawing from usual activities, or uncharacteristic rage or anger. 

Look closely for these signs when your shipmate is experiencing a combination of multiple stressors, including:

  • Relationship problems
  • Personal or professional loss
  • Recent career transitions
  • Disciplinary / legal issues and financial strain
  • The harmful effects of prolonged stress and chronic sleep deprivation

With many suicides, shipmates saw signs of distress but weren’t able to recognize them as indicators of suicide risk. Trust your gut and ACT (Ask, Care, Treat). Use intrusive leadership, look your shipmates in the eyes, and ask, “Are you okay?” 

I expect our leaders to build and support Command Resilience Teams. Along with suicide prevention coordinators, use your chaplains and embedded mental health providers. I want our leaders to set a tone within their commands where Sailors feel comfortable and have the courage to ask for help without fear of judgement or consequences. That way when Sailors do seek help, they do so confidently, knowing they’ll receive the support and resources they need.

While we have strengthened our efforts through initiatives like “Every Sailor Every Day,” along with the Sailor Assistance and Intercept for Life program, or SAIL, we have to sustain momentum beyond a singular conversation, momentary action or the creation of a new policy.

Help is always available. Call the Military Crisis Line at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), Military Crisis Line or text 838255 for free confidential support 24/7.

Be there for every Sailor, every day.

NORFOLK (Sept. 13, 2019) Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Paul Kopel and Peg Smith, health promotions staff members at the Branch Health Clinic (BHC) at Naval Station Norfolk, set up a display of 79 pairs of boots to remember the 79 Sailors who were lost to suicide in 2018 and to raise awareness for suicide prevention. “Have you seen the boots?” is an initiative to identify and remember Sailors lost to suicide and to identify what the Navy community is missing when it comes to this tragedy. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Imani N. Daniels/Released)

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/09/20/cno-adm-gilday-small-steps-save-lives/ poyrazdogany

CNO Gilday’s Message to the Fleet

Adm. Mike Gilday
Chief of Naval Operations

I am humbled and honored to be your Chief of Naval Operations. Together, we are part of the greatest navy in the world. Everyone on our team – officers and enlisted Sailors, active and reserve, uniformed and civilian – plays an important part in making sure we not only remain the greatest navy in the world, but that we get even better.

For the first time in a very long time, we face serious challenges at sea around the world. For decades, we took for granted that no other blue-water navy would dare take us on. That’s no longer true.

The U.S. Navy has been and will continue to be a global force for security and stability. But there are other nations who would use their maritime forces to threaten the freedom of the seas to intimidate their neighbors or to coerce others in violation of international law. Those maritime forces are growing in numbers and in strength. Still others know they cannot take us on at sea but will try to attack our Navy in areas like cyber.

Rapidly modernizing our Navy and keeping pace with technology will remain a priority for us.  But I still believe what my first chief told me, that people are our most important weapons system. A well trained force is our competitive advantage. I look forward to hearing from leaders at every level at how we can continue to make improvements for Sailors and their families.

And I have a great sense of urgency to get after solutions to the challenges we face.

In the coming weeks, my FIRST priority will be visiting with many of you. I will work with our leaders in the fleets, with our Marine Corps teammates and with our other joint service and international partners as we develop our way ahead to meet these challenges.

We will question our assumptions. We will think differently about the competition we are now in. We will be the Navy the nation needs now, and we will build the Navy the nation needs to fight and win in the future.

What remain constant are our core values of honor, courage and commitment. We will remain true to our core attributes of integrity, accountability, initiative and toughness. We will remain the premier Navy in the world, and I know we will be even better tomorrow than we are today.

Thank you for all you do for our Navy and for each other. I’ll see you out in the fleet.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/08/23/cno-gildays-message-to-the-fleet/ U.S. Navy

CNO Gilday’s Message to the Fleet

Adm. Mike Gilday
Chief of Naval Operations

I am humbled and honored to be your Chief of Naval Operations. Together, we are part of the greatest navy in the world. Everyone on our team – officers and enlisted Sailors, active and reserve, uniformed and civilian – plays an important part in making sure we not only remain the greatest navy in the world, but that we get even better.

For the first time in a very long time, we face serious challenges at sea around the world. For decades, we took for granted that no other blue-water navy would dare take us on. That’s no longer true.

The U.S. Navy has been and will continue to be a global force for security and stability. But there are other nations who would use their maritime forces to threaten the freedom of the seas to intimidate their neighbors or to coerce others in violation of international law. Those maritime forces are growing in numbers and in strength. Still others know they cannot take us on at sea but will try to attack our Navy in areas like cyber.

Rapidly modernizing our Navy and keeping pace with technology will remain a priority for us.  But I still believe what my first chief told me, that people are our most important weapons system. A well trained force is our competitive advantage. I look forward to hearing from leaders at every level at how we can continue to make improvements for Sailors and their families.

And I have a great sense of urgency to get after solutions to the challenges we face.

In the coming weeks, my FIRST priority will be visiting with many of you. I will work with our leaders in the fleets, with our Marine Corps teammates and with our other joint service and international partners as we develop our way ahead to meet these challenges.

We will question our assumptions. We will think differently about the competition we are now in. We will be the Navy the nation needs now, and we will build the Navy the nation needs to fight and win in the future.

What remain constant are our core values of honor, courage and commitment. We will remain true to our core attributes of integrity, accountability, initiative and toughness. We will remain the premier Navy in the world, and I know we will be even better tomorrow than we are today.

Thank you for all you do for our Navy and for each other. I’ll see you out in the fleet.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/08/23/cno-gildays-message-to-the-fleet/ U.S. Navy