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Category Archives: Sailors

Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Is an Ongoing Effort

By MyNavy HR Fleet Master Chief Wes Koshoffer


Shipmates, Fleet Master Chief Koshoffer from MyNavy HR here to talk about Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month.  COVID-19 mitigation efforts have really changed the way we are doing business in many areas of our Navy but there are some things that we must continue to work on, regardless of the scenario we are facing.  Preventing sexual harassment and sexual assault is one of those areas where we can never take our eye off the ball. 
 
Last year during Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month, we renewed our commitment to prevent sexual violence. This year, we will build on that pledge with some actionable steps: Respect. Protect. Empower. We must, at all times, commit to treating others with respect. Protecting one another from harm and empowering those around us to speak up and step in.
 
We all play a significant role in prevention! We have a great team of coordinators, advocates, and support personnel doing amazing work but the responsibility to protect our Shipmates is shared by every one of us. 
 
Every member of our team must set the tone, lead by example, and consistently engage in behavior that fosters dignity and respect. We must hold ourselves accountable to the highest possible standards of conduct, and we must create an inclusive team that is focused on building a stronger, more resilient, and more powerful Navy.
 
While April presents an opportunity to highlight the SAPR Program, eradicating sexual assault from our ranks can only be accomplished when all hands are engaged in creating a positive, professional environment that is built on trust.
 
Although we will not be able to conduct the same types of “events” that we normally would – we can still spend some time looking at the culture that we are creating in our workplace and we can certainly re-dedicate ourselves to the prevention of sexual assault in our Navy!
 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/04/27/sexual-assault-awareness-and-prevention-is-an-ongoing-effort/ U.S. Navy

CNO’s Message to the Fleet on Coronavirus

By Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday

Shipmates, it’s the 19th of March, 2020. A lot has changed in the past week, and the impacts of the coronavirus are changing daily life for all of us.

Our focus right now is threefold: We must protect our people, and we must maintain mission readiness. And finally, we have to support the whole-of-government effort.

That is why we’ve enacted additional policies designed to combat the spread of coronavirus.  

We’ve done a number of things, including moving to shift work, reducing our manning, and increasing our telework. We have closed DoD schools and many MWR facilities, as well as curtailed some child and youth programs. We have postponed our E-4 advancement exam, we’ve suspended the spring physical readiness test, and we’ve postponed drill weekends for reserves until May 11. We’ve also suspended recruit graduation ceremonies until further notice. Additionally, we will pause administrative and statutory promotion boards for the time being.

But many things remain open too, including our commissaries, our exchanges, our military treatment facilities, as well as our Military Health System Nurse Advice Line and our My Navy Career Center—all available 24/7 to answer your questions. 

We are also preparing our two 1,000-bed hospital ships, the Mercy and Comfort, to get underway to relieve pressure on civilian health providers, who are focused on treating folks with the coronavirus.

Operationally, to keep our ships, our aircraft and our submarines ready, commanders are empowered to take the necessary precautions, so they can effectively carry out their missions and meet the critical needs of our Sailors.

While 30 percent of our fleet is underway today—including four carrier strike groups and four amphibious ready groups—we must, to the greatest extent possible, practice social distancing, as well as good hygiene and cleanliness aboard our ships, in our offices, and in our homes.

America continues to depend on us to provide security and stability to this nation, and we will do just that.

Expect additional guidance over the days and weeks ahead as this situation continues to change. To stay up-to-date on these changes, check out our coronavirus page on Navy.mil. 

Finally, we must be mindful that while many of our shipmates are very adept at maintaining their support networks, for some, social distancing can lead to a loss of connectedness and feelings of isolation. You need to know that you’re not alone. 

If you or if one of your shipmates need help, reach out to the resources that we have available, whether it’s the Military Crisis Line, Military OneSource, our Navy chaplain care, or the Psychological Health Resource Center. We also have our Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center and our Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society.

Above all, take care of yourselves, your families, and each other. Your safety remains our primary concern as we continue to carry out the Navy’s mission in defense of our nation.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/03/19/cnos-message-to-the-fleet-on-coronavirus/ U.S. Navy

Navy Recruit Graduation: March 13, 2020

Navy Recruit Graduation: March 13, 2020 – Navy Live

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of Recruit Training Command’s graduation, Pass-In-Review. It is a formal military ceremony that honors a Sailor’s hard work and dedication to a new way of life. Pass-In-Review also ties together the future of the Navy with our long-held naval traditions and customs.

Read how Recruit Training Command transforms civilians into Sailors – 38,000 of them each year.

The live video from the Navy’s only boot camp at Great Lakes, Illinois, is scheduled to begin 8:45 a.m. CDT March 13.

Congratulations, Sailors! And welcome aboard to the newest members of our Navy family!

Join in the story of four recruits as they make their way into the Navy through the training pipeline, never before so intimately profiled, of the Navy’s Recruit Training Command in All Hands Magazine’s documentary “Making a Sailor.”

Navy Recruit Graduation: March 13, 2020– Navy Live

Join the #USNavy conversation on social media: FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube, and Flickr.

Congratulate the Navy’s newest Sailors by leaving a comment below.Edit

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/03/09/navy-recruit-graduation-march-13-2020/ U.S. Navy

Election Season Do’s and Don’ts

A guide for Sailors and Navy civil servants

With presidential and congressional elections approaching, the Navy encourages every one of us to exercise our right to vote.

Just as important is the right to free speech. But we also have the right to be free from political pressure while we’re at work. That means being mindful of laws that prevent us from using our position to advance a political view.

Boatswain’€™s Mate 3rd Class Jason Smith reviews the voting registration guidelines for North Carolina as he registers to vote while underway aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft Carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Torrey W. Lee/Released)

First, how much do you know about what you can and can’t do while on duty, in uniform or in the federal workplace?

Test your knowledge below–and then take a look at some great resources to help you stay on the right side of the law.

Quiz: True or False?

(Scroll down for the answers.)

1. I can wear my uniform at a political rally as long as it’s my Type IIs and my unit patch is removed.

2. It’s OK to volunteer for a campaign on your own time for things like phone banking, posting signs or asking for donations.

3. As long as I’m on my lunch break, I can “like” a political message on Facebook or retweet a candidate while I’m still on the installation.

4. It’s OK to have a poster of Presidents Teddy Roosevelt or John F. Kennedy on my wall since I served on both of the carriers named after them.

5. A campaign bumper sticker on your car or truck is permitted even while parked on a federal property.

6. I can bring to work a shirt with the logo #RESIST or Make America Great Again, as long as I don’t actually wear it.

7. A private conversation about a political issue is OK, even at work.

Who’s Included

Sailors, like other military service members, are bound by DoD Directive 1344.10, “Political Activities by Members of the Armed Forces.” This document outlines the specific types of political participation that military service members may take part in.

All federal civilians are bound by the Hatch Act of 1939. The U.S. Office of Special Counsel, which enforces the Hatch Act, offers answers to frequently asked questions about what’s allowed and what’s prohibited.

Some federal employees at certain agencies are subject to additional restrictions. For more information, visit the OSC’s Hatch Act information page. A quick summary is below.

A graphic that explains the difference between restricted and less restricted employees.
U.S. Navy graphic by Austin Rooney/Released

Sharing on Social Media

Graphic of social media icons

Social media can be particularly tricky. The OSC offers this printable PDF chart for what you can and can’t do on social.

All federal employees may not:

– Use a social media account in your official capacity to engage in political activity at any time (but including your official title/position on a social media profile is allowed).

– Tweet, retweet, share, or like a post or content that solicits political contributions at any time

– Like or follow the social media page of a candidate for partisan office or partisan group while on duty or in the workplace

– Engage in political activity via social media while on duty or in the workplace, or using government-owned equipment

In addition, further restricted employees may not:

– Link to or post the material of a partisan group or candidate for partisan office at any time

– Share or retweet the social media pages or posts of a partisan group or candidate for partisan office at any time

Quiz ANSWERS

1. False. You cannot wear any part of your uniform at a political function.

2. Mostly false. You can volunteer but can’t ask for donations.

3. False. Liking or retweeting while on federal property is not allowed, even from your personal phone while on your lunch break.

4. True. Since neither past president is a current candidate for office, you can display those items as allowed by your command or installation.

5. True. A normal-sized bumper sticker is permitted, even if you park your car on federal property.

6. False. The Office of Special Counsel has said that both slogans are political statements and so neither one is permitted in the federal workplace.

7. It depends. You still can’t advocate for or against a political candidate, but a friendly, private discussion of current events is allowed so long as the other person is a willing participant.

More Information

Read about real-world examples from the U.S. /Office of Special Counsel.
Read OSC advisory opinions on different aspects of the Hatch Act.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/03/06/election-season-dos-and-donts/ U.S. Navy

Best Job I’ve Ever Had

(New Year’s Day 2020 Deck Log Entry)

By Quartermaster 3rd Class Sara Nevison,
Deployed at Sea on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)

NOTE: The New Year’s Day deck log is a longstanding U.S. Navy tradition, in which a Sailor on watch pens his or her reflections in verse, which the watch stander on duty at midnight then enters into the deck log. For more on this tradition, see this article from Naval History and Heritage Command.

As another year comes to an end,
Sailors reflect on the past
And how it all began.

COMPTUEX was the first chapter
Of our long extended adventure.
Countless Surprise GQs and neverending
EMCON conditions
Were the ship’s main ambition.

But together through it all
All the Sailors stood tall
With acceptance of the fate
The ship was soon going to face.

‘Twas the night before deployment,
And all through the base,
Every Lincoln Sailor packing
Their sea bags and suitcase.
Saying goodbye to families
Because it’s the last day.

6th Fleet was our first stop.
Palma De Mallorca, Spain,
Made our mouths drop.
Such a beautiful place to see—
We wondered what the next port would be.

Duqm 1, Duqm 2, Duqm 3,
Arabian Sea.
Swim call, swim call—
Happy birthday, USS Abraham Lincoln!
The water is welcome to all.

Six short blasts are sounded:
Man overboard man overboard!
The chem light bandit still isn’t found yet.
Extensions upon extensions—
The ship was very much needed.
Missing holidays with family
Everyone felt defeated.

Good morning, Lincoln Nation!
We finally got some information.
We are headed to 7th Fleet,
But first we to clean
Your filthy pollywog feet.

We crossed the equator
And to become a shellback was in favor.
Covered in green slime
And drenched in saltwater of course,
We were accepted into King Neptune’s Court.

As we start off a new year,
Lincoln Sailors are in joy and glee
To what we leave behind in 2019.
Lots of memories and lots of fun,
But what comes next in 2020 has begun.

200101-N-ME568-1001 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 1, 2020) Quartermaster 3rd Class Ryan Gouger, from Newberg, Ore., enters the ship’s coordinates in the ship’s position log while standing Quartermaster of the Watch on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dan Snow/Released)
200101-N-ME568-1003 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 1, 2020) Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Kayla Whitcomb, from Springfield, Ill., rings in the new year with 16 bells while standing Boatswain’s Mate of the Watch on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dan Snow/Released)

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/12/31/best-job-ive-ever-had/ U.S. Navy

Best Job I’ve Ever Had

(New Year’s Day 2020 Deck Log Entry)

By Quartermaster 3rd Class Sara Nevison,
Deployed at Sea on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)

NOTE: The New Year’s Day deck log is a longstanding U.S. Navy tradition, in which a Sailor on watch pens his or her reflections in verse, which the watch stander on duty at midnight then enters into the deck log. For more on this tradition, see this article from Naval History and Heritage Command.

As another year comes to an end,
Sailors reflect on the past
And how it all began.

COMPTUEX was the first chapter
Of our long extended adventure.
Countless Surprise GQs and neverending
EMCON conditions
Were the ship’s main ambition.

But together through it all
All the Sailors stood tall
With acceptance of the fate
The ship was soon going to face.

‘Twas the night before deployment,
And all through the base,
Every Lincoln Sailor packing
Their sea bags and suitcase.
Saying goodbye to families
Because it’s the last day.

6th Fleet was our first stop.
Palma De Mallorca, Spain,
Made our mouths drop.
Such a beautiful place to see—
We wondered what the next port would be.

Duqm 1, Duqm 2, Duqm 3,
Arabian Sea.
Swim call, swim call—
Happy birthday, USS Abraham Lincoln!
The water is welcome to all.

Six short blasts are sounded:
Man overboard man overboard!
The chem light bandit still isn’t found yet.
Extensions upon extensions—
The ship was very much needed.
Missing holidays with family
Everyone felt defeated.

Good morning, Lincoln Nation!
We finally got some information.
We are headed to 7th Fleet,
But first we to clean
Your filthy pollywog feet.

We crossed the equator
And to become a shellback was in favor.
Covered in green slime
And drenched in saltwater of course,
We were accepted into King Neptune’s Court.

As we start off a new year,
Lincoln Sailors are in joy and glee
To what we leave behind in 2019.
Lots of memories and lots of fun,
But what comes next in 2020 has begun.

200101-N-ME568-1001 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 1, 2020) Quartermaster 3rd Class Ryan Gouger, from Newberg, Ore., enters the ship’s coordinates in the ship’s position log while standing Quartermaster of the Watch on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dan Snow/Released)
200101-N-ME568-1003 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 1, 2020) Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Kayla Whitcomb, from Springfield, Ill., rings in the new year with 16 bells while standing Boatswain’s Mate of the Watch on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dan Snow/Released)

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/12/31/best-job-ive-ever-had/ U.S. Navy

The Navy Picked You for a Reason

By Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday

Today, around the Navy and around the world, men and women—Sailors—are making an incredible transition and advancing to Chief Petty Officer. The Navy Memorial is one of our most sacred places, here in Washington, D.C., and today I will stand with a group of Sailors who will receive their anchors. I can’t think of a more fitting place to celebrate such a transformational day.

Over the past six weeks, many Sailors have been challenged, and those challenges were hard but nothing compared to what they will face in the years to come. And that’s ok, because challenge is good. Challenges strengthen us. As I reflect on the critical impact Chiefs have had on my life and career, I am convinced of the importance of the Mess as an institution.

My first Chief told me that our most important weapons system is our Navy Team and their families. People are and will continue to be our key competitive advantage over any adversary. The fact that I am highlighting this enduring principle, 34 years after I first heard it from my Chief, reflects how pivotal Chief Petty Officers have been in my own life and career.

Every time I get the opportunity to reconnect with a group of Chiefs, I leave feeling uplifted and inspired. Those brief times reinforce how important the institution of the Chief Petty Officers’ Mess is to our Navy and our nation.

I use that word institution carefully. When we use it, we often do so to indicate something that has merely been around for a long time. That’s not what I mean today. That usage of the word indicates staleness and complacency, the exact opposite of what the Chiefs’ Mess represents. The original meaning is far better. The word “institution” is the “action of establishing or founding” and under this definition, the institution of the Chiefs’ Mess is not who you are, or the insignia you wear, or the fact that we’ve marked this occasion for many years, but what you do, the actions you take, day-in, and day-out, large and small—that Chiefs routinely undertake to enable our Sailors to perform at their very best.

Even the briefest review of history demonstrates that Chief Petty Officers are Sailors of action. Some of their names, like John Finn, or Oscar Peterson or Peter Tomich—all Chiefs who were awarded the Medal of Honor—are legends in their own right. These examples of valor and of sacrifice are worthy of telling and retelling, but there is something even greater than these individual examples. Our Navy’s achievements throughout our history are due in large measure to the training and mentorship provided by Chief Petty Officers.

Later this year, we’ll commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Leyte Gulf. The line of heroes we look to for inspiration from that series of combat actions is long as well. We will remember Cmdr. Ernest Evans and Lt. Cmdr. Robert Copeland and Gunner’s Mate Third Class Paul Carr. A Chief isn’t in that list, but the Sailors and Officers we lionize from that battle were all trained and mentored by Chief Petty Officers. Those Chiefs would probably tell you that they weren’t looking for credit. They weren’t looking to get their name mentioned by the CNO 75 years later. They were focused on the actions they needed to take to establish the Chiefs’ Mess, to institute the Chiefs’ Mess—every day. They were focused on making our Navy team the most lethal weapons system in our arsenal and they were focused on creating winners – the Sailors and Officers whose actions would cement the U.S. Navy’s combat record and show that our destroyers can fight like battleships as they did at Leyte Gulf.

I sent a letter to all of the Chiefs who just donned their anchors, and I’ve charged them and those who already wear anchors to think about the Chiefs’ Mess as an institution: the sum of the daily acts, both small and large, that continue to challenge us and force us to rise to the standards of those who came before. The actions that will leave our Navy in a better position tomorrow. I also told them that this can’t happen from the physical space of the Mess. They have to be constantly involved in their Sailors’ lives on and off duty.

Chiefs, carrying forward the legacy of those who came before you will test you, and will draw on all the skills, knowledge, and experiences that formed the basis for your selection. The demands you face are tall indeed, and I have high expectations of our Chief Petty Officers, as do the Sailors you serve and lead. However, I am confident that you’ll rise to meet these obligations, making the most of each and every day, leading Sailors and Officers to fulfill the promise of their potential. The challenges we face as a Navy and a nation demand that you do so, as do those who wore anchors before you. We need your best efforts more than ever. I want every Chief in the fleet, new and old, to remember that the Navy not only expects more of you, but demands it—now more than ever. To those of you donning your anchors today, congratulations. You are now the Chief! Thank you for all that you do, and I’ll see you out in the fleet.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/09/18/the-navy-picked-you-for-a-reason/ poyrazdogany

Don’t Miss Out on Navy’s Social Media!

You check Instagram for great photographs, have your say via Twitter, get a LinkedIn account for career purposes and maybe even have a YouTube channel to post some niche videos. But do you know what your Navy has to offer you on social media? One of the channels to share our Navy’s story is social media.

Start exploring by checking out the latest info for Sailors on personnel policy:

@USNPeople on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Navy Detailers on Facebook also has some valuable information for you.

Navy’s leadership on social media are on Twitter @SECNAV76, @CNO, @MCPON and Facebook:

If you are interested in Navy’s history, heritage and legacy Naval History and Heritage Command on Facebook and the Sextant blog are for you.

For great photos in action, check out Blue Angels on Instagram.

U.S. Navy videos are all on YouTube. 

@NavyOutreach on Twitter lets you find your community at a #NavyWeek across the country.

Sailors have always been ambassadors of the Navy in their actions and words, at home and overseas. With that in mind, it’s important for you to understand what it means to communicate online to ensure you’re responsibly representing the Navy.

U.S. Navy Social Media Handbook, updated March 2019, is a comprehensive source for Navy leaders, communicators, Sailors, families, ombudsmen and civilians.

Don’t forget to frequently visit the U.S. Navy Social Media for the latest policy, guidelines, best practices, standard operating procedures, training and other resources.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/06/28/dont-miss-out-on-navys-social-media/ U.S. Navy

Remembering the Battle of Midway

By Rear Adm. Roy Kelley

Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

If time travel were possible, it would be interesting to go back and watch the Battle of Midway unfold. Sitting in the radio room, I could listen to pilots give updates on the position of the Japanese fleet. Then I would make my way to the flight deck and stand in awe watching Navy Avengers and Wildcats launch and recover. How amazing it would be to see and hear firsthand the actions of brave Sailors who literally reshaped history and the world as we know it today.

As a member of the Naval Air Force Atlantic team, the Battle of Midway is especially close to my heart because of the incredible impact it had on the Navy, Naval aviation and the evolution of how we conduct war from the sea.

Battle of Midway, June 1942. Torpedo Squadron Six (VT-6) TBD-1 aircraft are prepared for launching on USS Enterprise (CV-6) at about 0730-0740 , June 4, 1942.Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

From 1942 to 2019, over the course of 77 years, many aspects of naval warfare have evolvedbut some things remain resolute. During World War II, the aircraft carrier and its embarked air wing replaced the battleship as the most powerful naval offensive weapons system; that tide has not shifted.

It is amazing to see aircraft carriers are just as strategically vital to our nation’s defense now as then. While the concept of launching and recovering aircraft at sea has remained the same, the capability and lethality of our flattops has changed enormously.

The carriers at Midway were 820 feet long and dependent on oilers for fuel. Modern carriers are nearly 1,100 feet long and run on nuclear power. They can remain at sea for 25 years before needing to refuel.

As for our aircraft, the evolution is striking. Modern jets and helicopters have an increased lethality and can conduct a much wider range of missions, to include anti-submarine warfare, intelligence gathering, search and rescue, precision strike, offensive and defensive counter-air and many others.

One area where you would find little difference, however, is the quality of our men and women serving in uniform. From the Revolutionary War through the Battle of Midway to our ships deployed around the world today, our Sailors transcend time, passing pride, patriotism and professionalism from one generation to the next.

Those serving today are a direct reflection of the Sailors that stood on the bridge, worked on the flight decks and sat in the cockpit of aircraft taking off from USS Yorktown, USS Enterprise and USS Hornet in June 1942. I have no doubt that just like their predecessors, these dedicated and extremely bright men and women will lead the next “greatest generation.”

In 1942, our Navy was the only thing standing between freedom and tyranny. And ironically, today we are facing similar global threats around the world.

 

GULF OF ALASKA (May 25, 2019) The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) transits the Gulf of Alaska. Theodore Roosevelt is conducting routine operations in the Eastern Pacific. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Erick A. Parsons/Released)

Our fleet of 11 aircraft carriers have traveled millions of miles across the world’s oceans to fight our adversaries, deter aggression and ensure international waters remain free. Our current adversaries may be flying a different flag than those in 1942, but their intent to restrict access and intimidate other nations on the high seas is something we have seen before.

The aircraft carrier proved its worth at Midway. And today and for decades to come, our Nimitz- and Ford-class carriers will remain the backbone of the fleet.

Three U.S. Navy aircraft carriers at Midway turned the tide of the war in the Pacific. Today, at this moment, we have four carriers at sea: Lincoln, Reagan, Truman and Eisenhower. Each is manned by our nation’s best, prepared to take the fight to our enemies and ensure tyranny remains far from our shores.

For those who served at the Battle of Midway, we thank you for stepping forward to defend our great nation. For those who gave their lives during this historic engagement, your sacrifice was not in vain and will forever be rememberedespecially by your shipmates in Naval aviation.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/06/07/remembering-the-battle-of-midway/ jbell

Ethics is a Strategic Imperative for All Hands

By Adm. Bill Moran
Vice Chief of Naval Operations

Historically ethics has often been seen as a legalistic, zero sum determination of compliance with rules and minimum standards. We can — and we must — do better. Working together, we can view ethics for what it truly is: A strategic imperative for all of us, one that shifts our individual and organizational mind-sets from merely doing the thing right (i.e., process compliance) to always doing the right thing (i.e., the alignment of process, purpose, and values).

Fostering a culture that recognizes ethics as a strategic imperative for all hands will require three immediate actions from the team.

1. Officers: Empower down and learn daily from your team.

U.S. Navy Capt. Murz Morris, commodore of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 21, speaks to Sailors during an all-hands call aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) in the Indian Ocean, Dec. 6, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Logan C. Kellums/Released)

Most problems are best solved in the work spaces of your respective commands rather than here in Washington, D.C. Believe in your Sailors’ ingenuity, intellect and courage to innovate. Working closely at every step with your Chiefs Mess, you must earn, protect, and reciprocate your Sailors’ trust and confidence by making the deck plates our laboratory for new ideas and creative solutions.

Encourage your people to take smart, calculated, and measured risks to raise standards of performance and professionalism. Sailors want you to value their input and be open to positive feedback. Be comfortable with respectful and constructive confrontation, trust your teams, and mission accomplishment will follow.

2. Chiefs and Lead Petty Officers: Promote a culture of open communication and continual feedback.

Rear Adm. Edward Cashman speaks to the Chiefs’ Mess aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Gravely (DDG 107), Jan. 3.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Mark Andrew Hays/Released)

Constructive and respectful criticism is a hallmark of naval service. Sailors feel comfortable providing their honest feedback when they are confident that their voice will be heard.

As deck plate leaders and front line supervisors, you know your Sailors best; listen and learn, teach and develop, and recognize and reward your Sailors every single day. Actively invest in their personal and professional development, know them as people (not just Sailors), and enable their success.

3. Junior Sailors: Identify problems, propose solutions and take ownership.

You are smarter, more adaptable, and more innovative than any other generation of Sailors. Focus your immense talents on finding ways to improve your work centers, departments, commands, and our Navy.

Sailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) hold lines steady during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by ENS Sijing Y. Qiu/Released)

Do not fear failure; trust and collaborate creatively with your chain of command to improve, yet humbly recognize that our Navy is one team that must work together to achieve success. Anchored by your honesty and integrity, raise your own standards, so as to raise those of your command and of our entire Navy team.

Transforming ethics into a strategic asset is another step in the continued vitality of our people, our institution, and our purpose. Competing with character by overlaying ethics as a strategic imperative in everything we do will enhance readiness and result in a more lethal force that reflects the American values you protect every single day.

I am excited about the future of our Navy, and proud to serve with you as we confront the uncertainty of tomorrow together. See you in the Fleet!

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/05/02/ethics-is-a-strategic-imperative-for-all-hands/ U.S. Navy