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Category Archives: MCPON Russell Smith

COVID-19 Navy Update: CNO and MCPON Message to the Fleet

CNO: Shipmates, it’s the 30th of March, 2020. MCPON Smith and I wanted to provide you and your families an update on COVID-19. During this extraordinary time, what remains constant are our top three priorities: taking care of you and your families, being mission ready, and supporting the whole-of-government effort.

MCPON:
This past week, we’ve seen a rise in numbers who have tested positive for the coronavirus throughout the Fleet. We continue to take this threat very seriously and are working aggressively to keep Sailors healthy, as well as to prevent further spread of the virus.

CNO: We have to think, act, and operate differently right now to both protect Sailors and to remain mission ready. This is not business as usual. That is why many commanders have implemented a 14-day fast cruise for units preparing to get underway, which will conduct important training evolutions, exercises, or deployments.
 
MCPON: Additionally, we have implemented a 14-day restricted-movement policy for new recruits at RTC. And the entire RTC staff will also remain on base for up to 90 days, to minimize potential spread of the virus.
 
CNO: We are also supporting the whole-of-government approach in many ways. USNS Mercy arrived in Los Angeles last Friday, and USNS Comfort arrived in New York City this morning. We also deployed two expeditionary medical teams: one to Dallas, Texas, and the other to New Orleans.
 
MCPON: 2,200 Navy medical professionals are on board these ships, which will serve as referral hospitals for non-COVID-19 patients. Another 1,000 medical personnel are awaiting orders to be deployed.
 
CNO: In this fight, our Navy medical team is on the front line – fighting to care and treat the American people. Other Sailors from our Reserve and Engineering communities may join the coronavirus fight soon. You all have our thanks and our gratitude.
 
MCPON: People are the lifeblood of the Navy – and we are counting on every Sailor to take this outbreak seriously.

CNO:
While we recognize some new COVID-19 policies place a burden on you and your families, these actions must be taken to ensure your safety and also to maintain mission readiness.

MCPON:
To families and loved ones at home, thank you for your support and understanding. This is a hard time, and we could not do this without you.
 
CNO: I’ll end with this: As military professionals, we prepare daily to deal with adversity, uncertainty and conflict. Our Sailors and their families are resilient. We know you will set an example for your friends, for your neighbors and in your local communities on how to make personal sacrifices in service of the collective good. So stay safe, Shipmates. Americans depend on us for security. And we will not let them down.
 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/03/30/covid-19-navy-update-cno-and-mcpon-message-to-the-fleet/ U.S. Navy

Pacific Northwest CDS: How to Use Your Voice, Invoke Positive Change, and Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

By MC1 Sarah Villegas, Office of the MCPON

Known for its sprawling mountains, pine forests, and rivers of coffee, the Pacific Northwest (PNW) is a picturesque tourist destination.

It’s also home to several navy bases — serving critical warfare areas and providing an environment for the fleet to train, repair and replenish. 

MyNavyHr recently brought Navy leadership and detailers to meet with PNW Sailors to share more on current and upcoming initiatives while giving attendees the chance to share feedback during a Career Development Symposium.


The forum was about practicing radical candor on both ends: admirals and seamen alike, being transparent about limitations and opinions respectively. Imagine having the chance to tell “them” how much you dislike a policy or have a bone to pick with the process of picking orders? Sailors were able to do just that. Rather than being penalized for criticism, they were encouraged to speak up and offer solutions as to how we can work to fix issues and improve the Navy. 

This is where the whole process starts. Leaders like MCPON, the Chief of Naval Personnel, and the commander of Navy Personnel Command hit the road to find out what you need most. They visit ships, submarines and air squadrons to see what our folks need in order to accomplish the mission, while taking care of themselves and their families. 

Fulfilling those needs may involve various types of actions such as requesting increased funding in the budget, mining for innovative ideas, to finding compromises that work best for the Sailor and the Navy at large. From their visit to the deckplates, leadership then takes feedback and new ideas back to Washington D.C. to discuss with other senior leaders, such as the Chief of Naval Operations, Secretary of the Navy, and, as necessary, congressional members.   

Admittedly, positive change and addressing some of our most vexing challenges can be a slow moving process, often requiring additional funding, approval at various levels, and congressional support.

190227-N-YG104-0026 WASHINGTON (February 27, 2019) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith departs the Russell Senate Building, near the U.S. Capitol building, after testifying on Military Personnel Policies and Military Family Readiness during a hearing before the Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Personnel. Smith shared testimonies that advocated for child care, housing, and Sailor 2025 initiatives. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 1st Class Sarah Villegas/Released)

MCPON Testifies to Congress, Advocates for Quality of Life Resources

Some issues are easier to identify and solve than others. The feedback we get from Sailors on the deck plates is only part of the equation. Other parts include Facebook Live events, questions and comments on command social media pages, external media coverage, and other types of events, for instance, the National Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment at America’s Colleges, Universities and Service Academies

From these multiple sources, themes start to emerge, priorities determined, and perspective solutions become clearer. This all results in the wheels of positive change in the Navy to begin turning internally — and the wheels are always turning whether you seem them or not. 

This is why it’s crucial that you speak up — in a constructive manner — and share your insights. More than saying “it sucks,” share your ideas on how we can make it better for you, your Sailors, your family, and everyone that follows. After all, it’s your Navy. We are fortunate to live in an era where leadership believes that your voice is critical in solving the issues at hand. And, increasingly, there a multiple avenues of communication that are easier and more direct. Sure, it might seem intimidating to stand up and ask MCPON or an admiral a question, but remember, these leaders come to listen.  

The purpose of the many efforts discussed at CDS is to remove distractions that stand in the way of readiness. “Instead of standing in line at PSD or wasting your time trying to fix your pay, we want you to be able to perfect your craft while knowing that you and your family are well cared for.” -MCPON Smith 


The Navy is home to tremendous opportunities. As with any organization, it must continuously evolve and remedy issues in order to make it better for those who are a part of it. In order to reduce administrative distractions, there are projects underway to consolidate and improve communication between databases, so that a Sailor has to input one piece of information one time. Some of these creaky databases date back decades! That’s just one example that shows the mountains we’re climbing to modernize our personnel systems.

Commonly Asked Questions from CDS PNW:

Q: How does the Meritorious Advancement Program affect quotas? 

A: 10 percent of the total fiscal year 2019 advancement quotas have been allocated to 2019 MAP Season Two. NAVADMIN 176/19

Q: What’s the latest on Tuition Assistance?

A: Beginning Oct. 1, 2019, enlisted Sailors and officers must complete a minimum of two years of service before becoming eligible to use TA or NCPACE instructor-led or Distance Learning (DL) courses. This requirement may not be waived. In addition, TA and NCPACE (DL) funding is capped at 12 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) per fiscal year (FY) and a total of 120 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) in a career.  Most Sailors in recent years have only used up to an average of nine semester hours annually. NAVADMIN 114/19

Q: What is the Navy doing about increasing the availability of child care? 

A: The Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), which oversees the CDCs and MCCYN, is working hard to address the child care capacity shortfalls issue. While the Navy has made significant headway to meet the demand for child care Navy-wide through the combination of military-operated and approved community-based programs, there is more work to do. In FY20, Navy has budgeted increased funding for child care to add 1,000 new spaces through community partnerships. 

Q: Why is the Navy including planks to the Navy PRT? 

A: The plank is a better test of core strength and endurance and will likely reduce lower back injuries or strain due to poor form when doing the curl-up. The plank will be a timed event with scoring based on the amount of time a Sailor can maintain the plank position. Currently, the goal is to release these changes in calendar year 2020.

Q: What about beards?

A: No changes to the current policy are being considered. Safety continues to be the primary concern. In March 2016, the Naval Safety Center conducted a study to consider how facial hair affects the proper fit of respirators worn to conduct many duties in the Navy. The results showed that in general, the presence of beards and wide sideburns had a detrimental effect on the performance of the respirators. The study concluded that facial hair interferes with the seal and degrades respirator performance.

Obviously some of these are of much greater importance than others — depending on your circumstances both professionally and personally. These issues aren’t to be taken lightly, because they directly correlate to the livelihood, well-being, and retention of skilled Sailors.

Even if you don’t have a CDS coming to you anytime soon, you’re encouraged to reach out and reach up. Write a point paper, send an email to (usnpeople@navy.mil), or connect with the Navy on social media to shape the future of our Navy. Not only are you allowed, but you’re encouraged to do so. 

Just as the PNW is riddled with rugged terrain and obstacles to overcome, so is your service. Anything worth doing will have its challenges — but it’s better to be equipped with the gear and resources you need to get to the top of that mountain. 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/08/21/pacific-northwest-cds-how-to-use-your-voice-invoke-positive-change-and-answers-to-frequently-asked-questions/ parcher

Pacific Northwest CDS: How to Use Your Voice, Invoke Positive Change, and Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

By MC1 Sarah Villegas, Office of the MCPON

Known for its sprawling mountains, pine forests, and rivers of coffee, the Pacific Northwest (PNW) is a picturesque tourist destination.

It’s also home to several navy bases — serving critical warfare areas and providing an environment for the fleet to train, repair and replenish. 

MyNavyHr recently brought Navy leadership and detailers to meet with PNW Sailors to share more on current and upcoming initiatives while giving attendees the chance to share feedback during a Career Development Symposium.


The forum was about practicing radical candor on both ends: admirals and seamen alike, being transparent about limitations and opinions respectively. Imagine having the chance to tell “them” how much you dislike a policy or have a bone to pick with the process of picking orders? Sailors were able to do just that. Rather than being penalized for criticism, they were encouraged to speak up and offer solutions as to how we can work to fix issues and improve the Navy. 

This is where the whole process starts. Leaders like MCPON, the Chief of Naval Personnel, and the commander of Navy Personnel Command hit the road to find out what you need most. They visit ships, submarines and air squadrons to see what our folks need in order to accomplish the mission, while taking care of themselves and their families. 

Fulfilling those needs may involve various types of actions such as requesting increased funding in the budget, mining for innovative ideas, to finding compromises that work best for the Sailor and the Navy at large. From their visit to the deckplates, leadership then takes feedback and new ideas back to Washington D.C. to discuss with other senior leaders, such as the Chief of Naval Operations, Secretary of the Navy, and, as necessary, congressional members.   

Admittedly, positive change and addressing some of our most vexing challenges can be a slow moving process, often requiring additional funding, approval at various levels, and congressional support.

190227-N-YG104-0026 WASHINGTON (February 27, 2019) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith departs the Russell Senate Building, near the U.S. Capitol building, after testifying on Military Personnel Policies and Military Family Readiness during a hearing before the Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Personnel. Smith shared testimonies that advocated for child care, housing, and Sailor 2025 initiatives. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 1st Class Sarah Villegas/Released)

MCPON Testifies to Congress, Advocates for Quality of Life Resources

Some issues are easier to identify and solve than others. The feedback we get from Sailors on the deck plates is only part of the equation. Other parts include Facebook Live events, questions and comments on command social media pages, external media coverage, and other types of events, for instance, the National Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment at America’s Colleges, Universities and Service Academies

From these multiple sources, themes start to emerge, priorities determined, and perspective solutions become clearer. This all results in the wheels of positive change in the Navy to begin turning internally — and the wheels are always turning whether you seem them or not. 

This is why it’s crucial that you speak up — in a constructive manner — and share your insights. More than saying “it sucks,” share your ideas on how we can make it better for you, your Sailors, your family, and everyone that follows. After all, it’s your Navy. We are fortunate to live in an era where leadership believes that your voice is critical in solving the issues at hand. And, increasingly, there a multiple avenues of communication that are easier and more direct. Sure, it might seem intimidating to stand up and ask MCPON or an admiral a question, but remember, these leaders come to listen.  

The purpose of the many efforts discussed at CDS is to remove distractions that stand in the way of readiness. “Instead of standing in line at PSD or wasting your time trying to fix your pay, we want you to be able to perfect your craft while knowing that you and your family are well cared for.” -MCPON Smith 


The Navy is home to tremendous opportunities. As with any organization, it must continuously evolve and remedy issues in order to make it better for those who are a part of it. In order to reduce administrative distractions, there are projects underway to consolidate and improve communication between databases, so that a Sailor has to input one piece of information one time. Some of these creaky databases date back decades! That’s just one example that shows the mountains we’re climbing to modernize our personnel systems.

 

Commonly Asked Questions from CDS PNW:

Q: How does the Meritorious Advancement Program affect quotas? 

A: 10 percent of the total fiscal year 2019 advancement quotas have been allocated to 2019 MAP Season Two. NAVADMIN 176/19

Q: What’s the latest on Tuition Assistance?

A: Beginning Oct. 1, 2019, enlisted Sailors and officers must complete a minimum of two years of service before becoming eligible to use TA or NCPACE instructor-led or Distance Learning (DL) courses. This requirement may not be waived. In addition, TA and NCPACE (DL) funding is capped at 12 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) per fiscal year (FY) and a total of 120 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) in a career.  Most Sailors in recent years have only used up to an average of nine semester hours annually. NAVADMIN 114/19

Q: What is the Navy doing about increasing the availability of child care? 

A: The Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), which oversees the CDCs and MCCYN, is working hard to address the child care capacity shortfalls issue. While the Navy has made significant headway to meet the demand for child care Navy-wide through the combination of military-operated and approved community-based programs, there is more work to do. In FY20, Navy has budgeted increased funding for child care to add 1,000 new spaces through community partnerships. 

Q: Why is the Navy including planks to the Navy PRT? 

A: The plank is a better test of core strength and endurance and will likely reduce lower back injuries or strain due to poor form when doing the curl-up. The plank will be a timed event with scoring based on the amount of time a Sailor can maintain the plank position. Currently, the goal is to release these changes in calendar year 2020.

Q: What about beards?

A: No changes to the current policy are being considered. Safety continues to be the primary concern. In March 2016, the Naval Safety Center conducted a study to consider how facial hair affects the proper fit of respirators worn to conduct many duties in the Navy. The results showed that in general, the presence of beards and wide sideburns had a detrimental effect on the performance of the respirators. The study concluded that facial hair interferes with the seal and degrades respirator performance.

 

Obviously some of these are of much greater importance than others — depending on your circumstances both professionally and personally. These issues aren’t to be taken lightly, because they directly correlate to the livelihood, well-being, and retention of skilled Sailors.

Even if you don’t have a CDS coming to you anytime soon, you’re encouraged to reach out and reach up. Write a point paper, send an email to (usnpeople@navy.mil), or connect with the Navy on social media to shape the future of our Navy. Not only are you allowed, but you’re encouraged to do so. 

Just as the PNW is riddled with rugged terrain and obstacles to overcome, so is your service. Anything worth doing will have its challenges — but it’s better to be equipped with the gear and resources you need to get to the top of that mountain. 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/08/21/pacific-northwest-cds-how-to-use-your-voice-invoke-positive-change-and-answers-to-frequently-asked-questions/ parcher

MCPON Testifies to Congress, Advocates for Quality of Life Resources

The following is Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith’s oral testimony as delivered to the House Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans Affairs and Related Agencies, during a hearing on Quality of Life in the Military on Feb. 7, 2019.

Good morning, Chairwoman Wasserman-Schultz, Ranking Member Carter and distinguished members of this subcommittee, I am honored to appear before you today on behalf of the enlisted men and women of the United States Navy, to discuss some of the most significant issues affecting the quality of life of our dedicated 324,000 enlisted Sailors, officers and their families. It is my honor to represent Sailors deployed around the world. They defend our American freedom, opportunity and families of all walks of life.

We appreciate the solemn privilege we have as stewards of the public trust, and shoulder the responsibility to carefully manage and wisely obligate the resources the American public entrusts to us as their stewards. The Navy the Nation Needs demands much from us in this era of great power competition. We must become stronger, faster and effectively build better teams to compete and win in the high-end war-fight at sea.

GREAT LAKES, Ill. (Oct. 9, 2018) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith congratulates recruits during a capping ceremony inside USS Trayer (BST 21) at Recruit Training Command. Trayer, more commonly referred to as "Battle Stations," is the crucible event that recruits must pass prior to graduation, testing their knowledge and skills in basic seamanship, damage control, firefighting and emergency response procedures. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Spencer Fling/Released)

While we currently have the most capable ships and leading edge technology, our greatest edge in battle against any determined adversary will always be the asymmetric advantage that is provided by our people — the extraordinary talent and equity I have the honor of representing today. With that in mind, there are three specific areas I would like to discuss, that from my fleet engagements and numerous conversations with Sailors, I know are foremost on their minds.

First, family readiness and care. As the Chief of Naval Operations says, “a stronger family equals a stronger fleet.” One common thread I hear at every fleet visit among Sailors in all paygrades is accessibility to affordable and quality child care. A lot of people have tried to bin this and call it a women’s issue. It’s not. We have single fathers, single mothers and dual-working couples. I call this a family issue. Lack of available and affordable child care is a national issue for our generation. For our Navy, it is a critical readiness issue.

Second, infrastructure. As the Secretary of the Navy says, “infrastructure equals readiness.” Infrastructure directly supports ongoing missions and traditional roles of training and housing for Sailors, civilians and families. The condition of many Navy facilities impacts Sailors’ quality of life and their ability to train. Providing first-rate infrastructure contributes to a sharper focus on the mission.

And third, our Sailor 2025 program and initiatives. This is the most critical effort we’ve undertaken in the Navy since the turn of the 20th century to modernize and prioritize talent and innovation — to take our Navy beyond our competition and continue to be the best in the world. These initiatives effectively allow us to recruit, develop, manage, reward and retain talent in our force. Many administrative systems and programs were outdated, overly bureaucratic and riddled with administrative distractions that took time away from warfighters. Sailor 2025 efforts will return time and opportunity to units, allowing leaders to focus on tactical skills and warfighting readiness. Under Sailor 2025, we are empowering our Sailors.

PHILIPPINE SEA (Feb. 6, 2019) Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Kaylee Boudreau, from Pahrump, Nevada, launches an F-35B Lightning II aircraft attached to the F-35B detachment of the “Flying Tigers” of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262 (Reinforced), from the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) during a visit, board, search and seizure drill. Wasp, flagship of the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, with embarked 31st MEU, is operating in the Indo-Pacific region to enhance interoperability with partners and serve as a ready-response force for any type of contingency. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sean Galbreath/Released)

It is crucial that we make the shift from bureaucratic roadblocks to innovative highways. Harvesting innovation means reimagining traditional workflows to maximize efficiency, leveraging ideas that will give us a competitive edge, and developing a more agile workforce empowered to achieve excellence in everything we do and prevail in the maritime battlespace when called upon.

Through sustained commitment and continued investment in removing distractions, and to improving training and quality of life, we will ensure our greatest advantage — our Sailors — are ready for the fight. We appreciate the continuing efforts of Congress to ensure we have all that we need to fight and win. We have and will continue to improve fleet readiness and quality of life for our Sailors and their families, while remaining responsible stewards of taxpayer resources entrusted to our care. Thank you for your steadfast support for the men and women of the United States Navy.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/02/08/mcpon-testifies-to-congress-advocates-for-quality-of-life-resources/ U.S. Navy

MCPON Holiday Message: Stay ready for the fight, be vigilant and take care of each other

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Sept. 25, 2018) A Sailor watches the sun set from aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64. Carney, forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, was on its fifth patrol in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations in support of regional allies and partners as well as U.S. national security interests in Europe and Africa. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan U. Kledzik/Released)Our Navy team needs to remain vigilant and strong throughout this holiday period. Take care of each other and keep an eye on one another. As we progress through the holidays, lean on friends and shipmates; if needed, don’t be afraid to turn to (or urge a friend to do so) our more robust professional services – as I and other senior leaders have done in our careers – to find the help you need to get you through those moments that might seem insurmountable.

 

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (Sept. 18, 2018) Chief Machinist’s Mate Franklin Pollydore, from Georgetown, Guyana, assigned to USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN 78) engineering department, hugs his sponsor during a pinning ceremony held at the Sandler Center for the Performing Arts. Thirty-six Ford Sailors were advanced to the rank of chief petty officer. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Cat Campbell/Released)In talking with another Chief a long time ago, a phrase I used stuck with me: “the mountain that stands tallest is the one that stands before each of us.” It’s easy to dismiss our issues, or not seek help because we think others have it worse or think no one will understand, but it’s all about perspective. The challenges you face can be as serious and as overwhelming as you perceive them to be. A Marine I once worked for, Brig. Gen. Liszewski used to say “it’s ok not to be “ok,” but it’s not ok not to ask for help.” We are a team, and as a team we must help each other.

While we all need to find the time to take a knee and catch our breath, as a team we cannot relent in our pursuit of readiness, we must not loosen our grip – our sense of urgency – in preparing for the fight.

From the very birth of our American nation, we’ve understood the vulnerability and corresponding advantage of a time of anticipated relaxation. Washington’s daring maneuver to cross the Delaware River on Christmas night and attack Hessian forces in Trenton pressed an advantage presented by an enemy who was not expecting a fight.

"Washington Crossing the Delaware" by Emanuel Leutze, 1851 (Image courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art)
Image courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 13, 2017) Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mitscher (DDG 57) watch the USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) approach the Lewis and Clark-class dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13) for a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey J. Hopkins/Released)Our Sailors must be prepared to “fight tonight,” even if that night falls when we least expect it or want it to – for those on watch around the globe, our hearts are with you. For those of us who stand behind you, we will continue to provide the support you need; as the CNO delineates in the Design 2.0, those not in the fight will be ready to “rearm, resupply and repair our operational forces” – we will be where and when you need us to be in forceful backup.

Have a happy and safe holiday season.
MCPON Russell Smith

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/12/18/mcpon-holiday-message-stay-ready-for-the-fight-be-vigilant-and-take-care-of-each-other/ U.S. Navy

CNO, MCPON Answer Sailors’ Questions During Facebook Live

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith answered Sailors’ questions during a Facebook Live all-hands call on the Navy’s Facebook page Dec. 14 at the Pentagon. You can watch the full event above and highlights below.

 

WASHINGTON (Dec. 14, 2018) Public affairs personnel from the staffs of Adm. Richardson and MCPON Smith as well as the Navy’s digital media engagement team monitor questions during a Facebook Live all-hands call in the Pentagon. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Elliott Fabrizio/Released)
WASHINGTON (Dec. 14, 2018) Public affairs personnel from the staffs of Adm. Richardson and MCPON Smith as well as the Navy’s digital media engagement team monitor questions during a Facebook Live all-hands call in the Pentagon. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Elliott Fabrizio/Released)

 

Perhaps one of the most important things discussed was not being afraid to seek help with mental health. If you watch one thing online today, please make it MCPON’s Smith message in this video.

All Hands Call: Mental health

Perhaps one of the most important things that was discussed during Friday's all hands call was not being afraid to seek help with mental health. If you watch one thing online today, please make it MCPON's Smith message in this video.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

 

Sometimes, it doesn’t hurt to ask.
Thanks to a question, Adm. Richardson authorized on Friday gloves for wear with the fleece as an outer garment effectively immediately.

All Hands Call: Gloves with fleece

Sometimes, it doesn't hurt to ask during an all hands call.Thanks to a question, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson authorized on Friday gloves for wear with the fleece as an outer garment effectively immediately.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, December 15, 2018

 

During the all hands call, MCPON Smith was asked about advancement opportunities and shared insight into the Detailing Marketplace as part of Sailor 2025 Rating Modernization.

All Hands Call: Advancement opportunities

During Friday's all hands call, MCPON Smith was asked about advancement opportunities and shared insight into the Detailing Marketplace as part of Sailor 2025 Rating Modernization.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

 

Smith also discussed how tailored compensation will allow for the opportunity for bundled orders, geographic stability and other compensation.

All Hands Call: Tailored compensation

During Friday's all hands call, MCPON Smith explained how tailored compensation will allow for the opportunity for bundled orders, geographic stability and other compensation.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

Below is the link that Smith referenced in his above video response.

 

We’ve made changes to boot camp to better prepare recruits for the fleet. MCPON Smith explained those more stressful and less predictable changes.

All Hands Call: Boot camp changes

We've made changes to #USNavy boot camp to better prepare recruits for the fleet. During Friday's all hands call, Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith explained those more stressful and less predictable changes.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

 

The clock is ticking for eligible Sailors to decide whether to opt in to the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD)’s new Blended Retirement System. MCPON Smith offered some advice.

All Hands Call: Blended Retirement System

The clock is ticking for eligible Sailors to decide whether to opt in to the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD)'s new Blended Retirement System. Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith offered some advice during Friday’s all hands call.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

 

During the all hands call, Adm. Richardson addressed the possibility of a government shutdown.

All Hands Call: Possibility of government shutdown

During Friday’s all hands call, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson addressed the possibility of a government shutdown.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, December 15, 2018

 

Richardson also answered a question about whether future deployments could be similar to USS Harry S. Truman’s highly unpredictable deployment, which reflected Dynamic Force Employment.

All Hands Call: Dynamic Force Employment

In case you missed Friday's all hands call, we've got you covered.Listen as Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson answered a question about whether future deployments could be similar to USS Harry S. Truman's highly unpredictable deployment, which reflected Dynamic Force Employment.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, December 15, 2018

 

Thanks to everyone who participated! There were a lot of good questions – too many to answer! Be sure to follow Adm. Richardson and MCPON Smith on Facebook.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/12/16/cno-mcpon-answer-sailors-questions-during-facebook-live/ Jason Kelly

MCPON Letter to the Enlisted Force: Focus on building winning teams

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell L. Smith
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell L. Smith

The world stage is a very dynamic and challenging one, with many nations maturing their ability to efficiently operate in the maritime environment. The evolution of technology, and our Navy’s growth in this new “great powers” era demands that our Navy apply resources in a far more refined and complex manner. As our Navy’s storied legacy continues, the Navy the Nation Needs will demand more from us. We must become stronger, run faster and effectively build teams to compete and win in high-end warfare at sea.

Institutional loyalty – “ship, shipmate, self” – as well as organizational transparency and clear messaging will continue to be a priority, as well as dignity and respect between all of our teammates. Understanding the solemn privilege we have as stewards of the public trust will be emphasized. Austerity and humility are necessary attributes to embrace as we carefully manage the resources the American public has entrusted to us.

Every Navy leader aspires to leave behind a better and more prepared Navy than the one they found when they arrived, and I am no different. The principal concern of the Office of the MCPON remains first and foremost to serve as a determined advocate on behalf of our enlisted force, as well as to find ways to leverage our 3,000 master chiefs in leading 31,000 chief petty officers to build winning teams in preparation for the future fight. Together we must set a blistering pace above, on and below the sea, projecting strength so profoundly that we give pause to anyone who would dare challenge us.

Four great strengths of the Mess are technical competence, innovative thinking, communication and networking. These skills give us the ability to be a force multiplier in both peace and war, enabling us to solve the greatest challenges by connecting our Navy horizontally. Known for using deckplate skills and experience to innovate and get results, the Mess will be absolutely essential to finding new and better ways to build muscle memory that develops toughness, which will lead to true combat readiness.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (June 25, 2015) Chief Damage Controlman D. C. Coronado instructs Damage Controlman 3rd Class R. E. Berens, left, and Damage Controlman Firman D. R. Barber during a general quarters drill in the hangar bay of aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Harry S. Truman was underway conducting a tailored ship's training availability off the east coast of the United States. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class E. T. Miller/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (June 25, 2015) Chief Damage Controlman D. C. Coronado instructs Damage Controlman 3rd Class R. E. Berens, left, and Damage Controlman Firman D. R. Barber during a general quarters drill in the hangar bay of aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Harry S. Truman was underway conducting a tailored ship’s training availability off the east coast of the United States. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class E. T. Miller/Released)

 

We must keep Sailors from getting sidetracked or distracted, keeping them instead laser-focused on combat at sea against a determined enemy. To that end, we are engaged in delivering tools to the fleet, to render greater efficiencies in both personnel management and how we educate and train our Sailors. Those efforts will return time and opportunity to the deckplates, allowing leaders to focus on tactical skills and warfighting readiness.

Throughout our history, our greatest advantage has never been our machinery – rather, it has been the courage of the American Sailor facing adversity around the world. Perseverance, fortitude and spirit of service that each and every one of you brings to the fight will give us the decisive edge in the fight to come.

Russell L. Smith
MCPON

GREAT LAKES, Ill. (Oct. 9, 2018) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell L. Smith congratulates recruits during a capping ceremony inside USS Trayer (BST 21) at Recruit Training Command. Trayer, more commonly referred to as "Battle Stations," is the crucible event that recruits must pass prior to graduation, testing their knowledge and skills in basic seamanship, damage control, firefighting and emergency response procedures. More than 30,000 recruits graduate annually from the Navy's only boot camp. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Spencer Fling/Released)
GREAT LAKES, Ill. (Oct. 9, 2018) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell L. Smith congratulates recruits during a capping ceremony inside USS Trayer (BST 21) at Recruit Training Command. Trayer, more commonly referred to as “Battle Stations,” is the crucible event that recruits must pass prior to graduation, testing their knowledge and skills in basic seamanship, damage control, firefighting and emergency response procedures. More than 30,000 recruits graduate annually from the Navy’s only boot camp. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Spencer Fling/Released)

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/10/25/mcpon-letter-to-the-enlisted-force-focus-on-building-winning-teams/ U.S. Navy

Charge Letter from MCPON Smith

I wish I could write every Chief Petty Officer Selectee your own personal charge letter. It would give me great joy to meet all 4,700 of you – look you in the eye, shake your hand and welcome you into our Mess. Since I am unable to do that, please accept this charge letter to help guide you as you begin this new chapter.

Chief,

First and foremost, congratulations! This is quite an accomplishment and you should be incredibly proud of what you’ve done to put yourself in this position. Take a knee and contemplate that for a moment – all the experiences that have brought you to this milestone. Never forget where you came from and stay grounded in your beginnings. You’ve worked hard to demonstrate that you have the skills, talent and abilities. Now you will contribute to the Navy in an even more meaningful way.

That said, this selection is not a reward for what you’ve done throughout your extraordinary career. With your every act as a junior Sailor, you prepared yourself for this moment, and we are now calling on that talent and demanding – through your acceptance of this advancement – more from you. You will be expected to work longer hours, solve far more difficult problems and challenges, do more to empower your junior Sailors, and provide better and more seasoned advice to your officers. You must now work within the network of Chief Petty Officers, without desire for personal accolades, but rather a singular focus on building winning teams. In doing so, you will help the Mess do more together than we would otherwise be capable of based on the sum of our individual Chiefs alone.

MCPON Russell Smith

You stand ready to don your anchors entirely as a result of the culmination of every letter, phone call, mentoring session, sacrifice of time and resources, faith and goodwill of both supervisors and junior Sailors… everyone who has ever advocated for you, empowered you, helped fine-tune your eval, submitted an award for you, gave you a duty, listened to your opinion, called someone on your behalf, took a burden off your back, or put an arm around you and reassured you when you were frustrated. You have thousands of people standing behind you. Your Sailors, family, and your friends – many you know, but probably even some you don’t – have all given you something, and you are only here because of them. Because of this, you have a special obligation as result: to “earn this” every day. Be worthy of the sacrifice and love of the many who gave you this exalted opportunity. This is now your job, your sacred duty, to represent the best of yourself in everything you do, to be worthy of the benevolence that has given you this opportunity to be “The Chief.”

Confront your destiny head-on. Be the leader that you are and continue to grow by giving more and more to our Sailors every day. Humility is key – regardless of how much you feel you’ve earned your salt and proven your own. Accept your failures and grow from them – “when you lose, don’t lose the lesson.” Share the credit for your successes, and strive every day to “earn this” by charging forward on creating a better, stronger Navy at every opportunity.

You are now part of a longstanding and exceptional tradition. Lean on the vast network you are now a part of. Together, as unified Mess, we will relentlessly pursue excellence and build winning teams for our Navy, in order to achieve peak operational readiness as a combat ready force able to compete and win the high-end fight at sea.

Congratulations, and Welcome to the Mess!

All My Best,
Russell L. Smith,
MCPON

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/09/12/charge-letter-from-mcpon-smith/ U.S. Navy