Rustic American Flag Gunny's Job Board

Category Archives: EOD

Navy EOD: Clearing the Arctic’s Sea Lanes for Our Fleet and Nation

By Capt. Oscar Rojas, Commodore, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group One

Over the past two decades of war, Navy explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) has become almost synonymous with enabling counterinsurgency and counterterrorism operations in the deserts and mountains of the Middle East, growing our expertise in improvised explosive device threats and clearing a safe path for America’s special operators downrange. As we grew our force significantly to face these threats, we maintained our ability to support the fleet in responding to conflicts at sea and in the littorals. In an era of great power competition, we recognize the threats of an emerging Russia, China, North Korea, and Iran. We realize the important and incredibly specific role we hold in support of our Navy and our Nation. We are the only EOD force who is trained to eliminate and exploit underwater threats, and our expeditionary divers are the first naval assets on the scene to assist in salvaging ships and aircraft and clearing sea lanes and ports for use. This month, we shook the desert sand out of our boots and donned dry suits and cold-weather gear in Alaska as part of Arctic Expeditionary Capabilities Exercise 2019 to prepare our forces to operate in austere environments that could replicate future battlefields. As the Commander of U.S. Third Fleet’s Naval Expeditionary Combat Force (Combined Task Force 35), I mobilized our forces here for three reasons: to increase our agility in places we have not been in a long time; to test the limits of our technology, training, and logistics; and to build battle-mindedness across our force. 

Hunting Mines in the Gateway to the Arctic

One of the hallmarks of the EOD community is ensuring security and supporting safety not only for our Nation’s combat forces but also for the U.S. homeland. Additionally, we must prepare for a wide range of challenges and contingencies to preserve freedom of the seas and defend our sovereignty. Fittingly, the Department of Defense Arctic Strategy also calls for supporting these same objectives in the Arctic region. Our EOD forces, which include our expeditionary Navy divers, have expertise that is relevant to both large-scale military conflicts as well as low-intensity conflicts and regional posturing. Specifically, we are the only Navy community with mine warfare as a core competency for both our officers and enlisted, and our forces have exercised those capabilities in the Arctic waters off of Adak, Alaska this month. Sailors and Marines from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit One’s expeditionary mine countermeasure (ExMCM) companies successfully tested their ability to operate unmanned underwater vehicles and conduct expeditionary mine countermeasures in very shallow Arctic waters. This is the farthest north our man-machine team has operated in the Western hemisphere and the first time Navy EOD employed ExMCM companies to enable access in a simulated denied environment for the United States Marine Corps’ Special Marine Air-Ground Task Force’s amphibious operations.

ADAK, Alaska (Sept. 2, 2019)Operations Specialist 1st Class Sean McNamara, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit One (EODMU1), launches the Mk 18 Mod 2 Kingfish for an initial underwater survey of Sweeper Cove on Adak Island in the Alaska’s Aleutian chain. EODMU 1 is providing expeditionary mine countermeasures support in support of Arctic Expeditionary Capabilities Exercise 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Brandon Raile/Released)

As the Navy is responsible for supporting and enabling amphibious landings for the United States Marine Corps, a path to the beach should be determined free of danger before a landing force’s arrival. The very shallow water zone, defined as depths between 10 to 40 feet of water, presents unique environmental challenges that may limit underwater visibility and pose a greater danger of placing personnel in a minefield. During the exercise, the ExMCM company worked together with unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), specifically the Mk 18 Mod 1 Swordfish and Mk 18 Mod 2 Kingfish, to ensure the very shallow water zone was free of hazards. The team conducted mine hunting, hydrographic surveys and intelligence preparation of the operational environment ahead of Expeditionary Strike Group Three who will be conducting amphibious operations in the region in the coming weeks. Navy EOD’s competitive edge lies in how our human Sailors, with their creativity, pattern recognition and innovation, can team with technology to give our Nation the strongest mine countermeasure force with the fewest blind spots, and we are adamant about improving that relationship daily. During AECE 2019, we identified opportunities to refine our tactics, techniques and procedures and intend to share these lessons learned so that America’s Navy is better prepared to fight for sea control in the Arctic environment.

Mobile Diving and Salvage Teams Providing Port Access

Just as our EOD forces support deterrence of aggression, promote freedom of navigation and will contribute directly in a future fight for sea control, so too do our expeditionary divers. Underwater hazards can be used to deny free access to ports, harbors and river and restrict movement through critical sea lines of communication. Sailors from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit One (MDSU-1), based in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, mobilized to Adak, Alaska, to conduct a salvage and removal operation of the stranded fishing vessel Heritage that was blocking access to a boat ramp that is the primary launch point for commercial and private fishing vessels in the area. The abandoned fishing vessel prevented the local community from using the harbor to its full potential. The Navy divers conducted surveys and inspections on the fishing vessel in May to gain a full understanding of the job and what personnel and equipment would be required for the mission. After conducting the site survey, the divers found F/V Heritage was beyond salvageable due to its structural state, so they scrapped the vessel by cutting it in place until smaller sections of the vessel could be pulled onto shore for disposal. While this salvage and removal operation primarily focused on removing an underwater hazard for the community of Adak, it also provided realistic and relevant training for Navy divers in a cold-water environment to ensure they are ready to maintain physical access to ports and contribute to our Nation’s lethality whenever, wherever. Removing the fishing vessel not only removed a navigational hazard but also set the conditions for potential military training on Adak in the future.

ADAK, Alaska (Sept. 3, 2019) Navy Diver 1st Class Jack Dalziel, assigned to Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit One (MDSU 1), dismantles the hull of the F/V Heritage, an abandoned vessel that had been blocking access to a boat ramp on Adak Island in Alaska’s Aleutian chain. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Brandon Raile/Released)

MDSU-1 is one of only two such units in the entire U.S. that can clear ports by removing damaged or stranded vessels or returning them to sea. These units, comprised of Navy divers, engineering duty officers, explosive ordnance technicians, administrators, and medical teams, fall under the Navy EOD community because of the close relationship we share in conducting expeditionary diving objectives as well as the crossover between our two skillsets. Rest assured our Navy divers are combat-ready, rapidly deployable and able to conduct harbor clearance, salvage, underwater search and recovery, and underwater emergency repairs in any environment.

We were honored to assist the local community with such an important project in Adak, and we greatly appreciated their support of our EOD and dive teams while visiting. Like much of what we do, having a community that supports us makes our jobs easier and more enjoyable.

Commanding and Controlling Combat Forces

While our Navy EOD and dive teams conducted missions in Adak, our CTF 35 staff exercised our ability to command and control mine countermeasure forces from over 1,000 miles away in Anchorage. Typically mine countermeasure squadrons fulfill this role; however, in an expeditionary environment where a light, fast and precise ExMCM capability is needed, I wanted to ensure Navy EOD was ready to assume control of operations. Before arriving in Alaska, our team underwent mine countermeasures staff planning training in July to ensure we were properly prepared to support a mine warfare commander in combat. The procedures for employing and countering obstacles on land differ from those at sea, and after 17 years of land-focused warfare, I needed to know our staff understood how maritime forces work together to predict, detect, prevent, avoid, neutralize, protect and respond to potential hazards in the maritime domain.

Our communications team tested five different communications systems to support the command and control of our forces, including a test of our ability to conduct high-frequency communications, which has become a dying art form in recent years with the advent of satellite communications. In the future, it will be necessary to be able to establish communications in a denied environment if our satellite communications were to be hacked of jammed by an adversary.

Alaska (Sept. 3, 2019) Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group 1 established high-frequency radio communications from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 1 operating over 2,000 miles away in Adak, Ak., during Arctic Expeditionary Capabilities Exercise (AECE) 2019 with high frequency antennas. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Information Systems Technician Terry McCray-Matt/Released)

Instilling Battle-Mindedness

During the exercise, our training department created a rigorous expeditionary training schedule for Group One Sailors that included small arms training, land navigation, combat medicine training, counter-improvised explosive device, counter unmanned aerial systems and chemical weapon training. As members of Navy Expeditionary Combat Command, we have all been equipped with basic expeditionary combat skills through the Expeditionary Combat School, but our training does not stop at the schoolhouse. This exercise proved it does not take an operator to be battle-ready or battle-minded. Every single one of the Sailors assigned to Group One understands the necessity of this training and why we must be able to fight tonight. That is what sets us apart from our adversaries and what sets us apart as an expeditionary combat force. From the third class petty officer in our administrative shop to our most veteran EOD operators, our Sailors will be our asymmetric advantage against our adversaries in a future high-end fight.

Where We Are Headed

Conditions in the Arctic are changing fast and Navy presence in the region will only continue to grow in the future. It is no coincidence that we exercised our capabilities in the port of Adak, which sits at the strategic intersection of the North Pacific Great Circle Route and the Northwest Passage, Transpolar and Northern Sea Routes. As Arctic sea lanes open and shipping traffic increases, U.S. maritime forces have a responsibility as global leaders to secure shipping lanes, protect natural resources, deter conflict and safeguard national interests. Navy EOD will be the premier EOD force for ensuring that our forces in the Arctic region remain undeterred by the threat of explosives. As we execute our mission of eliminating explosive threats so our fleet and Nation can fight and win, whenever and wherever they choose, we are keeping a close eye on future opportunities in the region, developing cutting-edge technology and updating tactics so that we can increase the lethality of Navy EOD and maintain our competitive edge against our adversaries. We are extremely grateful for the opportunity to exercise our EOD and expeditionary diving capabilities in Alaska this month in support of the Navy and Marine Corps, and we thank the local community for their incredible support. We are already looking ahead to the future for more opportunities to train in Arctic waters in support of our nation’s objectives.

Capt. Oscar Rojas is currently serving as the Commodore of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group One stationed in San Diego, California. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group One mans, trains, and equips seven subordinate units to eliminate explosive threats for our fleet and Nation in any environment.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/09/19/navy-eod-clearing-the-arctics-sea-lanes-for-our-fleet-and-nation/ poyrazdogany

Navy EOD: Clearing the Arctic’s Sea Lanes for Our Fleet and Nation

By Capt. Oscar Rojas, Commodore, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group One

Over the past two decades of war, Navy explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) has become almost synonymous with enabling counterinsurgency and counterterrorism operations in the deserts and mountains of the Middle East, growing our expertise in improvised explosive device threats and clearing a safe path for America’s special operators downrange. As we grew our force significantly to face these threats, we maintained our ability to support the fleet in responding to conflicts at sea and in the littorals. In an era of great power competition, we recognize the threats of an emerging Russia, China, North Korea, and Iran. We realize the important and incredibly specific role we hold in support of our Navy and our Nation. We are the only EOD force who is trained to eliminate and exploit underwater threats, and our expeditionary divers are the first naval assets on the scene to assist in salvaging ships and aircraft and clearing sea lanes and ports for use. This month, we shook the desert sand out of our boots and donned dry suits and cold-weather gear in Alaska as part of Arctic Expeditionary Capabilities Exercise 2019 to prepare our forces to operate in austere environments that could replicate future battlefields. As the Commander of U.S. Third Fleet’s Naval Expeditionary Combat Force (Combined Task Force 35), I mobilized our forces here for three reasons: to increase our agility in places we have not been in a long time; to test the limits of our technology, training, and logistics; and to build battle-mindedness across our force. 

Hunting Mines in the Gateway to the Arctic

One of the hallmarks of the EOD community is ensuring security and supporting safety not only for our Nation’s combat forces but also for the U.S. homeland. Additionally, we must prepare for a wide range of challenges and contingencies to preserve freedom of the seas and defend our sovereignty. Fittingly, the Department of Defense Arctic Strategy also calls for supporting these same objectives in the Arctic region. Our EOD forces, which include our expeditionary Navy divers, have expertise that is relevant to both large-scale military conflicts as well as low-intensity conflicts and regional posturing. Specifically, we are the only Navy community with mine warfare as a core competency for both our officers and enlisted, and our forces have exercised those capabilities in the Arctic waters off of Adak, Alaska this month. Sailors and Marines from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit One’s expeditionary mine countermeasure (ExMCM) companies successfully tested their ability to operate unmanned underwater vehicles and conduct expeditionary mine countermeasures in very shallow Arctic waters. This is the farthest north our man-machine team has operated in the Western hemisphere and the first time Navy EOD employed ExMCM companies to enable access in a simulated denied environment for the United States Marine Corps’ Special Marine Air-Ground Task Force’s amphibious operations.

ADAK, Alaska (Sept. 2, 2019)Operations Specialist 1st Class Sean McNamara, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit One (EODMU1), launches the Mk 18 Mod 2 Kingfish for an initial underwater survey of Sweeper Cove on Adak Island in the Alaska’s Aleutian chain. EODMU 1 is providing expeditionary mine countermeasures support in support of Arctic Expeditionary Capabilities Exercise 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Brandon Raile/Released)

As the Navy is responsible for supporting and enabling amphibious landings for the United States Marine Corps, a path to the beach should be determined free of danger before a landing force’s arrival. The very shallow water zone, defined as depths between 10 to 40 feet of water, presents unique environmental challenges that may limit underwater visibility and pose a greater danger of placing personnel in a minefield. During the exercise, the ExMCM company worked together with unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), specifically the Mk 18 Mod 1 Swordfish and Mk 18 Mod 2 Kingfish, to ensure the very shallow water zone was free of hazards. The team conducted mine hunting, hydrographic surveys and intelligence preparation of the operational environment ahead of Expeditionary Strike Group Three who will be conducting amphibious operations in the region in the coming weeks. Navy EOD’s competitive edge lies in how our human Sailors, with their creativity, pattern recognition and innovation, can team with technology to give our Nation the strongest mine countermeasure force with the fewest blind spots, and we are adamant about improving that relationship daily. During AECE 2019, we identified opportunities to refine our tactics, techniques and procedures and intend to share these lessons learned so that America’s Navy is better prepared to fight for sea control in the Arctic environment.

Mobile Diving and Salvage Teams Providing Port Access

Just as our EOD forces support deterrence of aggression, promote freedom of navigation and will contribute directly in a future fight for sea control, so too do our expeditionary divers. Underwater hazards can be used to deny free access to ports, harbors and river and restrict movement through critical sea lines of communication. Sailors from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit One (MDSU-1), based in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, mobilized to Adak, Alaska, to conduct a salvage and removal operation of the stranded fishing vessel Heritage that was blocking access to a boat ramp that is the primary launch point for commercial and private fishing vessels in the area. The abandoned fishing vessel prevented the local community from using the harbor to its full potential. The Navy divers conducted surveys and inspections on the fishing vessel in May to gain a full understanding of the job and what personnel and equipment would be required for the mission. After conducting the site survey, the divers found F/V Heritage was beyond salvageable due to its structural state, so they scrapped the vessel by cutting it in place until smaller sections of the vessel could be pulled onto shore for disposal. While this salvage and removal operation primarily focused on removing an underwater hazard for the community of Adak, it also provided realistic and relevant training for Navy divers in a cold-water environment to ensure they are ready to maintain physical access to ports and contribute to our Nation’s lethality whenever, wherever. Removing the fishing vessel not only removed a navigational hazard but also set the conditions for potential military training on Adak in the future.

ADAK, Alaska (Sept. 3, 2019) Navy Diver 1st Class Jack Dalziel, assigned to Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit One (MDSU 1), dismantles the hull of the F/V Heritage, an abandoned vessel that had been blocking access to a boat ramp on Adak Island in Alaska’s Aleutian chain. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Brandon Raile/Released)

MDSU-1 is one of only two such units in the entire U.S. that can clear ports by removing damaged or stranded vessels or returning them to sea. These units, comprised of Navy divers, engineering duty officers, explosive ordnance technicians, administrators, and medical teams, fall under the Navy EOD community because of the close relationship we share in conducting expeditionary diving objectives as well as the crossover between our two skillsets. Rest assured our Navy divers are combat-ready, rapidly deployable and able to conduct harbor clearance, salvage, underwater search and recovery, and underwater emergency repairs in any environment.

We were honored to assist the local community with such an important project in Adak, and we greatly appreciated their support of our EOD and dive teams while visiting. Like much of what we do, having a community that supports us makes our jobs easier and more enjoyable.

Commanding and Controlling Combat Forces

While our Navy EOD and dive teams conducted missions in Adak, our CTF 35 staff exercised our ability to command and control mine countermeasure forces from over 1,000 miles away in Anchorage. Typically mine countermeasure squadrons fulfill this role; however, in an expeditionary environment where a light, fast and precise ExMCM capability is needed, I wanted to ensure Navy EOD was ready to assume control of operations. Before arriving in Alaska, our team underwent mine countermeasures staff planning training in July to ensure we were properly prepared to support a mine warfare commander in combat. The procedures for employing and countering obstacles on land differ from those at sea, and after 17 years of land-focused warfare, I needed to know our staff understood how maritime forces work together to predict, detect, prevent, avoid, neutralize, protect and respond to potential hazards in the maritime domain.

Our communications team tested five different communications systems to support the command and control of our forces, including a test of our ability to conduct high-frequency communications, which has become a dying art form in recent years with the advent of satellite communications. In the future, it will be necessary to be able to establish communications in a denied environment if our satellite communications were to be hacked of jammed by an adversary.

Alaska (Sept. 3, 2019) Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group 1 established high-frequency radio communications from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 1 operating over 2,000 miles away in Adak, Ak., during Arctic Expeditionary Capabilities Exercise (AECE) 2019 with high frequency antennas. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Information Systems Technician Terry McCray-Matt/Released)

Instilling Battle-Mindedness

During the exercise, our training department created a rigorous expeditionary training schedule for Group One Sailors that included small arms training, land navigation, combat medicine training, counter-improvised explosive device, counter unmanned aerial systems and chemical weapon training. As members of Navy Expeditionary Combat Command, we have all been equipped with basic expeditionary combat skills through the Expeditionary Combat School, but our training does not stop at the schoolhouse. This exercise proved it does not take an operator to be battle-ready or battle-minded. Every single one of the Sailors assigned to Group One understands the necessity of this training and why we must be able to fight tonight. That is what sets us apart from our adversaries and what sets us apart as an expeditionary combat force. From the third class petty officer in our administrative shop to our most veteran EOD operators, our Sailors will be our asymmetric advantage against our adversaries in a future high-end fight.

Where We Are Headed

Conditions in the Arctic are changing fast and Navy presence in the region will only continue to grow in the future. It is no coincidence that we exercised our capabilities in the port of Adak, which sits at the strategic intersection of the North Pacific Great Circle Route and the Northwest Passage, Transpolar and Northern Sea Routes. As Arctic sea lanes open and shipping traffic increases, U.S. maritime forces have a responsibility as global leaders to secure shipping lanes, protect natural resources, deter conflict and safeguard national interests. Navy EOD will be the premier EOD force for ensuring that our forces in the Arctic region remain undeterred by the threat of explosives. As we execute our mission of eliminating explosive threats so our fleet and Nation can fight and win, whenever and wherever they choose, we are keeping a close eye on future opportunities in the region, developing cutting-edge technology and updating tactics so that we can increase the lethality of Navy EOD and maintain our competitive edge against our adversaries. We are extremely grateful for the opportunity to exercise our EOD and expeditionary diving capabilities in Alaska this month in support of the Navy and Marine Corps, and we thank the local community for their incredible support. We are already looking ahead to the future for more opportunities to train in Arctic waters in support of our nation’s objectives.

Capt. Oscar Rojas is currently serving as the Commodore of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group One stationed in San Diego, California. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group One mans, trains, and equips seven subordinate units to eliminate explosive threats for our fleet and Nation in any environment.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/09/19/navy-eod-clearing-the-arctics-sea-lanes-for-our-fleet-and-nation/ poyrazdogany

Quad Cities Celetrate Navy Week

The eighth Navy Week of 2019 took America’s Navy to Quad Cites, Iowa, June 24-30.  Navy Weeks play a vital role in connecting the American public with Sailors, assets and Navy equipment. The weeklong engagement introduces the local communities who do not have frequent visibility of the Navy, with an understand why having a strong Navy is so invaluable to our country. Both residents and Sailors interacted in outreach events providing the opportunity to meet Sailors firsthand with a visible awareness the mission, capabilities and importance of the U.S. Navy.


Sailors assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) pose for a picture with Kelly Sullivan Loughren, the ship’s sponsor and granddaughter of Albert Sullivan, one of five brothers who are the namesake for the ship, in front of the Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum during a visit to Waterloo, Iowa as part of Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Gunner’s Mate 3rd Class Taylor Ruggles, assigned to USS Constitution, discusses life aboard the ship with a member of Lindsay Park Yacht Club during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Nathan Roth/Released)
Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Technicians assigned to EOD Group One suit up a member of the Quad Cities Elite FIRST Robotics Competition Team in a bomb suit at the Arconic Learning Center during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Helen Brown/Released)
Kelly Sullivan Loughren, the sponsor of guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) and granddaughter of Albert Sullivan, one of five brothers who are the namesake for the ship, explains the story behind artifacts in the Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum to Sailors assigned to USS The Sullivans during a visit to Waterloo, Iowa as part of Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
The U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, diamond pilots perform the Low Break Cross maneuver during a demonstration at the Quad City Air Show at the Davenport Municipal Airport in Davenport, Iowa. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timothy Schumaker/Released)
Members of Navy Band Great Lakes play a concert at the Family Museum during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Sailors assigned to USS Constitution parade the colors before the start of a River Bandits Minor League baseball game during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Sailors assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) visit the Sullivan family memorial in Calvary Cemetery in Waterloo, Iowa as part of Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
After being suited up by Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Technicians assigned to EOD Group One, a member of the Quad Cities Elite FIRST Robotics Competition Team greets his peers at the Arconic Learning Center during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Helen Brown/Released)
Hull Technician 3rd Class Pamela Hensley, assigned to USS Constitution, discusses the ship’s hull construction with visitors at Putnam Museum during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Nathan Roth/Released)

Check to see if a Navy Week is coming to your community.  Scheduled cities in 2019 are:

– Duluth, Minn., July 15-21

– Grand Junction, Colo., July 22-28

– Boise, Idaho, Aug. 19-25

– St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 2-8

– Wichita, Kan., Sept. 9-15

– Charleston, W.V., Oct. 14-20

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/07/05/quad-cities-celetrate-navy-week/ ltall

Quad Cities Celetrate Navy Week

The eighth Navy Week of 2019 took America’s Navy to Quad Cites, Iowa, June 24-30.  Navy Weeks play a vital role in connecting the American public with Sailors, assets and Navy equipment. The weeklong engagement introduces the local communities who do not have frequent visibility of the Navy, with an understand why having a strong Navy is so invaluable to our country. Both residents and Sailors interacted in outreach events providing the opportunity to meet Sailors firsthand with a visible awareness the mission, capabilities and importance of the U.S. Navy.


Sailors assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) pose for a picture with Kelly Sullivan Loughren, the ship’s sponsor and granddaughter of Albert Sullivan, one of five brothers who are the namesake for the ship, in front of the Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum during a visit to Waterloo, Iowa as part of Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Gunner’s Mate 3rd Class Taylor Ruggles, assigned to USS Constitution, discusses life aboard the ship with a member of Lindsay Park Yacht Club during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Nathan Roth/Released)
Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Technicians assigned to EOD Group One suit up a member of the Quad Cities Elite FIRST Robotics Competition Team in a bomb suit at the Arconic Learning Center during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Helen Brown/Released)
Kelly Sullivan Loughren, the sponsor of guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) and granddaughter of Albert Sullivan, one of five brothers who are the namesake for the ship, explains the story behind artifacts in the Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum to Sailors assigned to USS The Sullivans during a visit to Waterloo, Iowa as part of Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
The U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, diamond pilots perform the Low Break Cross maneuver during a demonstration at the Quad City Air Show at the Davenport Municipal Airport in Davenport, Iowa. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timothy Schumaker/Released)
Members of Navy Band Great Lakes play a concert at the Family Museum during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Sailors assigned to USS Constitution parade the colors before the start of a River Bandits Minor League baseball game during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Sailors assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) visit the Sullivan family memorial in Calvary Cemetery in Waterloo, Iowa as part of Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
After being suited up by Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Technicians assigned to EOD Group One, a member of the Quad Cities Elite FIRST Robotics Competition Team greets his peers at the Arconic Learning Center during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Helen Brown/Released)
Hull Technician 3rd Class Pamela Hensley, assigned to USS Constitution, discusses the ship’s hull construction with visitors at Putnam Museum during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Nathan Roth/Released)

Check to see if a Navy Week is coming to your community.  Scheduled cities in 2019 are:

– Duluth, Minn., July 15-21

– Grand Junction, Colo., July 22-28

– Boise, Idaho, Aug. 19-25

– St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 2-8

– Wichita, Kan., Sept. 9-15

– Charleston, W.V., Oct. 14-20

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/07/05/quad-cities-celetrate-navy-week/ ltall

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (April 22, 2019) Personnel Specialist 2nd Class Jessica Bruenn, explains her experiences as a master helmsman aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is currently deployed in defense of American forces and interests in the 5th and 6th fleet areas of operation. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs, ships and aircraft of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2, and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. (U.S. Navy video by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Shane Bryan/Released) 190422-N-AD724-1001

Lt. Matthew “Hunter” Harvey, commanding officer of Coastal Riverine Squadron 3, Alpha Company, Crew 1, is piped ashore after an assumption of command ceremony at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, California. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Boatswain’s Mate Nelson Doromal/Released)
Boatswain’s Mate Seaman Kyle Galiza stands watch aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) as the ship transits the Bab al- Mandeb strait. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Nicholas R. Boris/Released)
Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician 1st Class Kyle Hall, from Tacoma, Wash., assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5, conducts tactical maneuvering techniques during a routine training evolution. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jasen Moreno-Garcia/Released)
Master-at-Arms Seaman Devon Weston, a military working dog handler assigned to Naval support Activity Naples, poses for a photo with military working dog Boy, a Jack Russell terrier, on the obedience course at NSA Naples, June 3, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Damon Grosvenor/Released)
Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuel) Airman Morgan Oyler inspects a jet fuel sample in the jet fuel quality assurance lab aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Donovan M. Jarrett/Released)
Quartermaster 3rd Class Brett List, from Sacramento, Calif., uses an alidade to identify the bearing of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26) as the ship arrives in Pearl Harbor. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kyle Carlstrom/Released)
Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Kristin Snyder carries the urn of Missile Technician 2nd Class Nathan A. Castor during a funeral ceremony at Barrancas National Cemetery, June 5, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Greg Mitchell/Released)
Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Jonathan Faletoi provides instructional help teaching Naval Hospital Bremerton’s Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) program. Faletoi was recently selected as Naval Hospital Bremerton’s Senior Sailor of the Quarter. (U.S Navy photo by Douglas H Stutz/Released)
Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Jacobo Chavira stands watch aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) as the ship transits the Bab al- Mandeb strait. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Nicholas R. Boris/Released)
Hull Maintenance Technician 3rd Class Ethen Christensen performs corrective valve maintenance in the pipe shop aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Donovan M. Jarrett/Released)
Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Gabriel Aparicio, right, stands as flag bearer with the burial guard during a burial at sea aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Justin R. Pacheco/Released)
Quartermaster Seaman Jack Zulon uses an alidade as the guided-missile destroyer USS Gravely (DDG 107) departs Kiel, Germany for Baltic Operations (BALTOPS) 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Mark Andrew Hays/Released)
Officers stand watch on the bridge of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26) as the ship pulls into Visakhapatnam, India for a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kyle Carlstrom/Released)
Ensign Alejandra Murillo, from Huntington Beach, Calif., uses the “big eyes” aboard the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26) to identify landmarks as the ship pulls into Visakhapatnam, India for a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kyle Carlstrom/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/06/18/faces-of-the-fleet-298/ ltall

Navy Week Celebrated in Puerto Rico for the First Time

San Juan welcomed members of the U.S. Navy during the first Puerto Rico Navy Week, April 8-14.  Hailed as the Island of Enchantment, the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico hosted the first Navy Week outside the continental U.S., introducing the local communities to the importance of the U.S. Navy.  Sailors showcased the mission, capabilities and achievements of the U.S. Navy through a variety of community outreach events, giving residents the opportunity to meet Sailors and get a look at what the U.S. Navy does globally.  The Navy Week program raises awareness of the Navy and reinforces its importance to the national defense strategy.

Cmdr. Charles Knight, assigned to Navy Recruiting Detachment Jacksonville, engages in a conversation with Angel Pagan, an Army veteran, former private first class assigned to the 65th Infantry Regiment Borinqueneers and awardee of the Purple Heart Medal, as part of a meet-and-greet event during Navy Week Puerto Rico at La Casa Del Veterano, a veterans home in Juana Díaz, Puerto Rico. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Maria G. Llanos/Released)
Lt. Tim Loret and Explosive Ordnance Disposal 3rd Class Dan Livesay, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 12 demonstrate an explosive ordnance disposal bomb suit to one of the children at Boys and Girls Club during Navy Week Puerto Rico. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Maria G. Llanos/Released)
Elba Ruiz, a World War II veteran and one of the first 13 female nurses from Puerto Rico’s Women’s Army Corps, meets Capt. Miguel Cubano, commanding officer of Naval Health Clinic Corpus Christi, Texas as part of a meet-and-greet event during Navy Week Puerto Rico. (US Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Rafael Martie/Released)
Operations Specialist 3rd Class Yolyvette Ceneto, assigned to Navy Recruiting Detachment Jacksonville, engages in a conversation with National Guard veteran Monserrate Quiñones Segui, who served in the Korean War, as part of a meet-and-greet event during Navy Week Puerto Rico at La Casa Del Veterano, a veterans home in Juana Díaz, Puerto Rico. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Maria G. Llanos/Released)
Personnel Specialist 1st Class Andrew Amstutz, assigned to USS Constitution, gives a presentation about the history of “Old Ironsides” to students at Colegio Sagrado Corazones during Navy Week San Juan, Puerto Rico. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman Olivia K. Manley/Released)
Seaman Joel Parodi Perez, assigned to USS Constitution, presents a cutlass to kids at Boys and Girls Club during Navy Week Puerto Rico. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Maria G. Llanos/Released)
Explosive Ordnance Disposal 3rd Class Ryan Miller, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Mobile Unit 12 demonstrates a small unmanned ground vehicle at Boys and Girls Club during Navy Week Puerto Rico. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Maria G. Llanos/Released)

Check to see if a Navy Week is coming to your community.  Scheduled cities in 2019 are:

– Oklahoma City, Okla., May 27-June 2

– Nashville, Tenn., June 3-9

– Quad Cities, Iowa, June 24-30

– Duluth, Minn., July 15-21

– Grand Junction, Colo., July 22-28

– Boise, Idaho, Aug. 19-25

– St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 2-8

– Wichita, Kan., Sept. 9-15

– Charleston, W.V., Oct. 14-20

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/04/18/navy-week-celebrated-in-puerto-rico-for-the-first-time/ ltall

First Navy Week of 2019 Kicks Off in Mobile

Beginning the first of 14 scheduled Navy Weeks held across the country, a port visit by ship to Mobile, Ala., coincided with the city’s Mardi Gras celebration. The Navy Week brought a variety of events, equipment, and Sailors to the city for a weeklong series of engagements with the public, key influencers, and organizations representing all sectors of the community.  Navy Weeks serve as the Navy’s principal outreach effort in areas of the country without a significant Navy presence to educate Americans and raise awareness about what the U.S. Navy does globally in support of the national defense strategy.

Sailors assigned to USS Constitution parade the colors during the Joe Cain Procession and Parade at Mardi Gras during Mobile Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Gian Prabhudas/Released)
Cmdr. Joseph Fals, right, commanding officer of the guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG 95), and Command Master Chief Vernon Milligan, command master chief of James E. Williams, participate in the King Felix III and Floral Mardi Gras Parade during Mobile Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caledon Rabbipal/Released)
The Navy Band Southeast marches in the King Felix III Mardi Gras Parade during the final day of Mobile Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caledon Rabbipal/Released)
Sailors assigned to Navy Recruiting Command perform push-ups while participating in the King Felix III Mardi Gras Parade during the final day of Mobile Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caledon Rabbipal/Released)
Cmdr. Joseph Fals, commanding officer of the guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG 95), is escorted off the ship by the Mobile Azalea Trail Maids after arriving in port to participate in Mobile Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caledon Rabbipal/Released)
Rear Adm. Ronald R. Fritzemeier, right, chief engineer of Space and Naval Warfare Command, speaks with U.S. Coast Guard veteran Dean Chapman while visiting Eagles Landing, a homeless veterans housing center, during Mobile Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caledon Rabbipal/Released)
Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson, left, speaks to Rear Adm. Ronald R. Fritzemeier, chief engineer of Space and Naval Warfare Command, and Command Master Chief of Program Executive of Ships and SEA 21 (TEAM SHIPS) Antonio D. Perryman, from Mobile, during the first day of Mobile Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caledon Rabbipal/Released)
Command Master Chief of Program Executive of Ships and SEA 21 (TEAM SHIPS) Antonio D. Perryman, from Mobile, speaks to students during a Navy Day at Baker High School held in support of Mobile Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caledon Rabbipal/Released)
Navy Band Southeast performs during a Navy Day at Baker High School in support of Mobile Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caledon Rabbipal/Released)
Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician 3rd class Jonah Avillanoza, from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 2, helps coach Zachary Fore, from Baker High School in Mobile County, Alabama, don on EOD 9 bomb suit during Navy Recruiting Command’s Swarm Mobile evolution. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brandon Woods/Released)
Personnel Specialist Seaman Jordan A. Young, from Red Oak, Texas, assigned to USS Constitution, shows students at Kate Shepard Elementary School in Mobile, Alabama, the food an “Old Ironsides” sailor would eat in 1812 during Mobile Alabama Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman Olivia K. Manley/Released)
Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class Jeffrey Scott Williams, from Vandalia, Ohio, assigned to USS Constitution, teach knot-tying to children at The Boys and Girls Club of South Alabama during Mobile Alabama Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman Olivia K. Manley/Released)
Personnel Specialist Seaman Jordan A. Young, from Red Oak, Texas, and Seaman Ana Tomic, from Vancouver, Washington, assigned to USS Constitution, present an “Honorary Sailor” certificate to a patient at USA Children’s and Women’s Hospital during Mobile Alabama Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman Olivia K. Manley/Released)
The Navy Band Southeast marches in the King Felix III Mardi Gras Parade during the final day of Mobile Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caledon Rabbipal/Released)
Sailors assigned to Navy Band Southeast greet spectators in the King Felix III Mardi Gras Parade during the final day of Mobile Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caledon Rabbipal/Released)
Rear Adm. Ronald R. Fritzemeier, right, chief engineer of Space and Naval Warfare Command, tours Eagles Landing, a homeless veterans housing center, during Mobile Navy Week. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caledon Rabbipal/Released)

 

Check to see if a Navy Week is coming to your community.  Scheduled cities in 2019 are:

– Charleston, S.C., March 11-17

– Miami, Fla., March 25-31

– Wilmington, N.C., April 1-7

– Puerto Rico, April 8-14

– Oklahoma City, Okla., May 27-June 2

– Nashville, Tenn., June 3-9

– Quad Cities, Iowa, June 24-30

– Duluth, Minn., July 15-21

– Grand Junction, Colo., July 22-28

– Boise, Idaho, Aug. 19-25

– St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 2-8

– Wichita, Kan., Sept. 9-15

– Charleston, W.V., Oct. 14-20

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/03/08/first-navy-week-of-2019-kicks-off-in-mobile/ ltall

Cleveland Held Navy Week

The “Rock and Roll Capital of the World” concluded the 11th Navy Week of 2018. Cleveland hosted the U.S. Navy Aug. 27 through Sept. 3 for a week-long series of community outreach engagements. These events are designed to bring the Navy and its Sailors to parts of the U.S. without proximity to the Fleet, in an effort to educate people and raise awareness about what the U.S. Navy does around the world. Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas B. Modly, also returned to his hometown to speak with local business and community leaders about the Navy’s mission.

The United States Navy Ceremonial Guard perform during the city of Cleveland’s First Responders Family Night at the Zelma George Recreation Center during Cleveland Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
The U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, perform during the Cleveland Air Show at Burke Lakefront Airport during Cleveland Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
Cleveland Mayor Frank G. Jackson presents the Cleveland Navy Week proclamation to Vice Adm. Forrest Faison, Navy surgeon general, during the Navy Week Cleveland proclamation ceremony in Cleveland, Ohio. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
Navy Diver 1st Class Erik Clark, from Ashland, N.C., attached to Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2, demonstrates the operation of an explosive ordinance disposal robot to John Marshall School of Engineering High School students during Cleveland Navy Week in Cleveland, Ohio. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
Navy Diver 1st Class Erik Clark, from Ashland, N.C., attached to Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2, helps a child try on a dive helmet at the King Kennedy Boys and Girls Club during Cleveland Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
The Honorable Thomas B. Modly, Under Secretary of the Navy, applauds Haraz Ghanbari, while the rank of lieutenant commander is placed on his shoulders during Cleveland Navy Week at Progressive Field before the start of the Major League Baseball game between the Cleveland Indians vs. Tampa Bay Rays. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
Guests view various aircraft during the Cleveland Air Show at Burke Lakefront Airport during Cleveland Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
Navy Diver 2nd Class David Purkey, from Hemet, Calif., attached to Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2, demonstrates the operation of an explosive ordnance disposal robot to Horizon Science Academy high school students during Cleveland Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
The Honorable Thomas B. Modly, Under Secretary of the Navy, speaks with Medal of Honor recipient veteran Hershel Woodrow “Woody” Williams, during Cleveland Navy Week at Progressive Field before the start of the Major League Baseball game between the Cleveland Indians vs. Tampa Bay Rays. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
Lt. Damien Horvath, from Bay Village, Ohio, attached to Navy Operational Support Unit in Tampa, Fla., speaks to students from Horizon Science Academy about what it takes to be an officer in the Navy during Cleveland Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
The Honorable Thomas B. Modly, Under Secretary of the Navy, receives the baseball for the ceremonial first pitch from a bomb disposal robot during Cleveland Navy Week at Progressive Field before the start of the Major League Baseball game between the Cleveland Indians vs. Tampa Bay Rays. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
Vice Adm. Forrest Faison, right, Navy surgeon general, participates in a panel about the future of Navy medicine and improving and maintaining high combat survivability at the City Club of Cleveland Forum during Cleveland Navy Week in Cleveland, Ohio. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
Sailors attached to the United States Navy Ceremonial Guard answer questions from a group of children at the King Kennedy Boys and Girls Club during Cleveland Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
The Honorable Thomas B. Modly, Under Secretary of the Navy, shakes Cleveland’s mayor Frank G. Jackson’s hand at Cleveland City Hall during Cleveland Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)
Sailors attached to the U.S. Fleet Forces Band perform at Edgewater Park Beach during Cleveland Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released)

Would you attend a Navy Week celebration near you ?

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/09/07/cleveland-held-navy-week/ ltall

Louisville Navy Week Held

Coinciding with the Kentucky State Fair, the tenth Navy Week of 2018 hosted Sailors in Louisville for a week long celebration August 20-26.  The primary purpose of the Navy Week program is to increase Navy awareness by presenting the Navy to Americans who live in cities that normally do not have a significant naval presence.  Both residents and Sailors interacted in a series of community outreach events providing the opportunity to meet Sailors firsthand with a visible awareness the mission, capabilities and importance of the U.S. Navy.

Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director of the Defense Health Agency, meets with Greg Fischer, the mayor of Louisville, Ky., during Louisville Navy Week in Louisville, Ky. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Musician 3rd Class Amanda Thompson, assigned to the Fleet Forces Band, salutes after singing the national anthem at a Louisville Bats minor league baseball game during Fleet Week in Louisville, Ky. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Rear Adm. Michael Jabaley, former program executive officer for submarines, pins the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, World War II Victory Medal and American Campaign Medal on William Edward Gilbert at Louisville Veterans Affairs Medical Center during Navy Week in Louisville, Ky. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technicians 2nd Class David Eninger and Abraham Ruiz, both assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 2, speak to students in the YMCA’s Childcare Enrichment Program at Breckenridge Franklin Elementary School in Louisville, Ky., during Lousiville Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Missile Technician 2nd Class Michael Jemison and Machinist’s Mate (Nuclear) 2nd Class Justin Mohn, both assigned to the Blue crew of the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Kentucky (SSBN 737), are interviewed by Dawnee Gee on the news program WAVE Country during Navy Week in Louisville, Ky. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Rear Adm. Michael Jabaley, former program executive officer for submarines, experiences the Navy’s virtual reality asset, “Nimitz,” at the Kentucky State Fair during Navy Week in Louisville, Ky. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Sailors assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 2 explain the operation of a TALON explosive ordnance disposal robot to the Central High School Robotics Club during Louisville Navy Week in Louisville, Ky. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)

Would you attend a Navy Week celebration near you ?

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/08/31/louisville-navy-week-held/ ltall

Milwaukee Navy Week Celebrated

The ninth Navy Week of 2018 hosted America’s Navy during Milwaukee Navy Week August 6 -12 as both Sailors and residents interacted in a series of community outreach events.  The Navy Week program serves as the Navy’s principal outreach effort into areas of the country without a significant Navy presence.  The program is designed to help Americans understand that their Navy is deployed around the world, around the clock, ready to defend America at all times.

Rear Adm. Don Gabrielson, commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 11, and Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett pose for a photograph during the mayor’s proclamation of Milwaukee Navy Week at city hall. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan J. Batchelder)
Members of Navy Band Great Lakes march in the Wisconsin State Fair daily parade during Milwaukee Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan J. Batchelder)
Navy Diver 2nd Class David Purkey, assigned to assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 2, poses for a photograph with children at Discovery World Science and Technology Center during Milwaukee Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan J. Batchelder)
Navy Diver 1st Class Thomas Gerace assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 2 places a KM-37 diving helmet on a volunteer at the Milwaukee Public Museum during Milwaukee Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan J. Batchelder)
Seaman Ashley Watson, assigned to USS Constitution, interacts with children at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater LaVarnway during Milwaukee Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey Scoular)
Lt. Deidre Coulson-Tucker, assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 1, demonstrates helicopter take-off signals to a volunteer at the Daniels-Mardak Boys & Girls Club during Milwaukee Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan J. Batchelder)
Master Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician Chad Harris, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 2, demonstrates a bomb-disposal robot to onlookers at the Milwaukee Public Museum during Milwaukee Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan J. Batchelder)
Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Amanda Stanaway, from Springfield, Ohio, assigned to USS Constitution, interacts with a child at Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater LaVarnway Clubhouse during Milwaukee Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey Scoular)

Would you attend a Navy Week celebration near you ?

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/08/15/milwaukee-navy-week-celebrated/ ltall