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Category Archives: Personnel/Performance

Education and Learning an Operational Imperative

By John Kroger, Chief Learning Officer and Vice Adm. John Nowell, Chief of Naval Personnel

Learning, innovation, and personal and professional development are part of our Naval heritage and continue to be important in enabling the warfighters of today.

Our service is moving forward in recording and recognizing educational and learning achievements in our formal fitness reports to ensure it is viewed as a strategic priority, alongside our ships, aircraft and weapons systems. 

This will give our Navy a warfighting advantage and allow us to thrive and win against any competitor in this rapidly changing and complex global environment.

Education and a commitment to continuous learning is an operational imperative and, through our enhanced talent management processes, we will empower and reward officers who accelerate their intellectual development and improve their performance through education and learning opportunities.

To support these goals, and in conjunction with MyNavy HR’s efforts to integrate education effectively into Sailor 2025 talent management initiatives, fitness reports (FITREPs) will include specific comments regarding education, learning, and support for a learning culture. This requirement will allow us to identify, select, and reward those officers who have demonstrated the commitment and ability to learn, as well as those who encourage and support the learning of others, by placing them into positions of influence at the tactical, operational, and strategic levels.

NAVADMIN 137/20, released May 7, brings together key elements of the Navy’s Education for Seapower Strategy 2020 and the MyNavy HR Sailor 2025 initiative to better align and integrate naval education into warfighting development and talent management. From selection boards to detailing, those officers with a proven commitment and ability to learn, and who encourage others to learn, will thrive, and this must be formally documented and considered in Fitness Reports.

As acting Secretary of the Navy James E. McPherson has said, “To deter and outfight potential opponents in a great power competition, our force of professionals is going to have to outthink them, and we can only do that through continual learning and education. Our action today will ensure that our talent management system rewards officers who advance warfighting effectiveness through intellectual development and represents an important milestone as we implement our comprehensive “Education for Seapower Strategy.” 

Education and continuous learning will hold greater value within the modernized and enhanced talent management system – promotion boards, selection processes, and detailing decisions. To enable this, we must have all of the right information available through our performance evaluation system.

According to the message, documentation in FITREPs must include personal achievements in education and learning that contribute to a culture of continuous learning, improved knowledge, and warfighting effectiveness at both the individual and unit level. Education and continuous learning progress, achievements and contributions will also receive greater emphasis during statutory and administrative selection boards.

The value that education and continuous learning brings to our Navy team’s quest to maintain overmatch against any threat is undisputed. It is imperative to document an individual’s commitment to intellectual growth so that our warfighters have a benchmark to strive for in bettering themselves year after year across their career.

BUPERS Instruction 1610.10E reflects the policy changes and provides guidance to reporting seniors regarding the documentation of professional military education, off-duty education, and other educational and learning achievements pursued during a reporting period. Additionally, personal achievement in education and learning, and support of the education and learning efforts of others, will be linked to block 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 performance trait content in existing FITREP assessment criteria.

Additionally, reporting seniors are directed to document all education and learning whether Professional Military Education, Navy, civilian, or unit level education. The reporting senior should also consider the degree to which the member performs self-assessment and improvement, pursues professional development and education, improves current skills and knowledge, and acquires new skills.

Specific examples of continuous learning that should be documented include: resident and non-resident professional military education coursework, professional and academic qualifications and certifications, civilian education coursework, personal reading program that includes (but is not limited to) selections from CNO’s Reading List, participation in discussion groups and military societies, writing in national security or military journals, and involvement in learning through new technologies.

Instructions and guidance on filling out the applicable areas of a FITREP can be found in the message.

As the chief of naval operations detailed in FRAGO 01/2019, our nation expects a Navy ready to fight today and the policy updates announced in NAVADMIN 137/20 actively moves the Navy forward in terms of the modernization and transformation needed to ensure we are ready for tomorrow. We will instill continuous learning behaviors to broaden and deepen warfighting knowledge, which will enable adaptation, improvement, and strengthen mission command to outthink and outfight any adversary. The changes to the FITREP system ensure that we, as a Service, keep sight that learning is the ultimate warfare enabler and intellectual development a critical warfighting capability.

In closing, we hope leaders at all levels see the importance in this change – and support every member of the team’s pursuit to learn, develop, and ultimately become better warfighters.  

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/05/07/education-and-learning-an-operational-imperative/ poyrazdogany

MyNavy HR – Serving Sailors 24/7

If you’re seeking information on your career, pay grades and health or policy concerning family, reserves and veterans, you can find it here.

We compile personnel and policy announcements being made during 2020 to help Sailors and their families.

Go to All Hands Magazine online for information on the Navy’s culture and heritage, and feature information for Sailors.

For your mobile phone and tablet, check out the latest editions of the Navy App Locker where you can find information on uniform regulations, education, fitness and more.

Click the categories below for announcements presented in reverse chronological order.

CAREER

CIVILIANS

EDUCATION/TRAINING

EXAMS

HEALTH

PERFORMANCE/PROMOTION

RELOCATION

RESERVES/VETERANS

SPOUSES/FAMILY

TECH TOOLS

UNIFORMS

FINANCIAL/BENEFITS

Follow this page for updates.

CAREER

16-year-mark Cap Removed from GI-Bill Transferability Policy (Jan. 10, 2020)

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Sailors who are serving beyond 16 years and meet service-commitment eligibility criteria now retain the option to transfer GI Bill benefits to dependents as outlined in NAVADMIN 006/20 announced Jan. 10. Read more on Navy.mil

Navy Announces New Legalman Conversion Opportunities (Jan. 9, 2020)

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Beginning in 2020, the Navy’s Legalman (LN) community is expanding career opportunities for Sailors interested in cross-rating. Read more on Navy.mil


PERFORMANCE/PROMOTION

MyNavy HR Announces MAP will Remain at 20% of Total Advancement Opportunity in 2020 (Jan. 9, 2020)

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Top-performing junior Sailors will continue to have the opportunity to be promoted to the next rank under the Meritorious Advancement Program (MAP), as outlined in NAVADMIN 005/20. Read more on Navy.mil


RESERVES/VETERANS

Navy Reserve Announces One-Stop Shop for Reserve Order Opportunities (Jan. 28, 2020)

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) — Commander, Navy Reserve Forces Command (CNRFC) announces the release of ZipServe, a new application that allows Reservists to apply for all Reserve order opportunities. Read more on Navy.mil


TECH TOOLS

Sailors Can Access MyNavy Portal Without Common Access Card (Feb. 3, 2020)

ARLINGTON, Va. (NNS) — Sailors have been asking for it and today the Navy delivered! Sailors can now access MyNavy Portal (MNP) from their personal mobile devices using their mobile web browser without a CAC. Read more on Navy.mil


UNIFORMS

Navy Announces Institution of Surface Warfare Officer Leather Jacket (Jan. 9, 2020)

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) qualified officers can now stand bridge watches in a soon-to-be issued leather jacket per NAVADMIN 004/20 released Jan. 9. Read more on Navy.mil

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2020/02/05/mynavy-hr-serving-sailors-24-7/ poyrazdogany

Pacific Northwest CDS: How to Use Your Voice, Invoke Positive Change, and Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

By MC1 Sarah Villegas, Office of the MCPON

Known for its sprawling mountains, pine forests, and rivers of coffee, the Pacific Northwest (PNW) is a picturesque tourist destination.

It’s also home to several navy bases — serving critical warfare areas and providing an environment for the fleet to train, repair and replenish. 

MyNavyHr recently brought Navy leadership and detailers to meet with PNW Sailors to share more on current and upcoming initiatives while giving attendees the chance to share feedback during a Career Development Symposium.


The forum was about practicing radical candor on both ends: admirals and seamen alike, being transparent about limitations and opinions respectively. Imagine having the chance to tell “them” how much you dislike a policy or have a bone to pick with the process of picking orders? Sailors were able to do just that. Rather than being penalized for criticism, they were encouraged to speak up and offer solutions as to how we can work to fix issues and improve the Navy. 

This is where the whole process starts. Leaders like MCPON, the Chief of Naval Personnel, and the commander of Navy Personnel Command hit the road to find out what you need most. They visit ships, submarines and air squadrons to see what our folks need in order to accomplish the mission, while taking care of themselves and their families. 

Fulfilling those needs may involve various types of actions such as requesting increased funding in the budget, mining for innovative ideas, to finding compromises that work best for the Sailor and the Navy at large. From their visit to the deckplates, leadership then takes feedback and new ideas back to Washington D.C. to discuss with other senior leaders, such as the Chief of Naval Operations, Secretary of the Navy, and, as necessary, congressional members.   

Admittedly, positive change and addressing some of our most vexing challenges can be a slow moving process, often requiring additional funding, approval at various levels, and congressional support.

190227-N-YG104-0026 WASHINGTON (February 27, 2019) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith departs the Russell Senate Building, near the U.S. Capitol building, after testifying on Military Personnel Policies and Military Family Readiness during a hearing before the Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Personnel. Smith shared testimonies that advocated for child care, housing, and Sailor 2025 initiatives. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 1st Class Sarah Villegas/Released)

MCPON Testifies to Congress, Advocates for Quality of Life Resources

Some issues are easier to identify and solve than others. The feedback we get from Sailors on the deck plates is only part of the equation. Other parts include Facebook Live events, questions and comments on command social media pages, external media coverage, and other types of events, for instance, the National Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment at America’s Colleges, Universities and Service Academies

From these multiple sources, themes start to emerge, priorities determined, and perspective solutions become clearer. This all results in the wheels of positive change in the Navy to begin turning internally — and the wheels are always turning whether you seem them or not. 

This is why it’s crucial that you speak up — in a constructive manner — and share your insights. More than saying “it sucks,” share your ideas on how we can make it better for you, your Sailors, your family, and everyone that follows. After all, it’s your Navy. We are fortunate to live in an era where leadership believes that your voice is critical in solving the issues at hand. And, increasingly, there a multiple avenues of communication that are easier and more direct. Sure, it might seem intimidating to stand up and ask MCPON or an admiral a question, but remember, these leaders come to listen.  

The purpose of the many efforts discussed at CDS is to remove distractions that stand in the way of readiness. “Instead of standing in line at PSD or wasting your time trying to fix your pay, we want you to be able to perfect your craft while knowing that you and your family are well cared for.” -MCPON Smith 


The Navy is home to tremendous opportunities. As with any organization, it must continuously evolve and remedy issues in order to make it better for those who are a part of it. In order to reduce administrative distractions, there are projects underway to consolidate and improve communication between databases, so that a Sailor has to input one piece of information one time. Some of these creaky databases date back decades! That’s just one example that shows the mountains we’re climbing to modernize our personnel systems.

Commonly Asked Questions from CDS PNW:

Q: How does the Meritorious Advancement Program affect quotas? 

A: 10 percent of the total fiscal year 2019 advancement quotas have been allocated to 2019 MAP Season Two. NAVADMIN 176/19

Q: What’s the latest on Tuition Assistance?

A: Beginning Oct. 1, 2019, enlisted Sailors and officers must complete a minimum of two years of service before becoming eligible to use TA or NCPACE instructor-led or Distance Learning (DL) courses. This requirement may not be waived. In addition, TA and NCPACE (DL) funding is capped at 12 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) per fiscal year (FY) and a total of 120 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) in a career.  Most Sailors in recent years have only used up to an average of nine semester hours annually. NAVADMIN 114/19

Q: What is the Navy doing about increasing the availability of child care? 

A: The Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), which oversees the CDCs and MCCYN, is working hard to address the child care capacity shortfalls issue. While the Navy has made significant headway to meet the demand for child care Navy-wide through the combination of military-operated and approved community-based programs, there is more work to do. In FY20, Navy has budgeted increased funding for child care to add 1,000 new spaces through community partnerships. 

Q: Why is the Navy including planks to the Navy PRT? 

A: The plank is a better test of core strength and endurance and will likely reduce lower back injuries or strain due to poor form when doing the curl-up. The plank will be a timed event with scoring based on the amount of time a Sailor can maintain the plank position. Currently, the goal is to release these changes in calendar year 2020.

Q: What about beards?

A: No changes to the current policy are being considered. Safety continues to be the primary concern. In March 2016, the Naval Safety Center conducted a study to consider how facial hair affects the proper fit of respirators worn to conduct many duties in the Navy. The results showed that in general, the presence of beards and wide sideburns had a detrimental effect on the performance of the respirators. The study concluded that facial hair interferes with the seal and degrades respirator performance.

Obviously some of these are of much greater importance than others — depending on your circumstances both professionally and personally. These issues aren’t to be taken lightly, because they directly correlate to the livelihood, well-being, and retention of skilled Sailors.

Even if you don’t have a CDS coming to you anytime soon, you’re encouraged to reach out and reach up. Write a point paper, send an email to (usnpeople@navy.mil), or connect with the Navy on social media to shape the future of our Navy. Not only are you allowed, but you’re encouraged to do so. 

Just as the PNW is riddled with rugged terrain and obstacles to overcome, so is your service. Anything worth doing will have its challenges — but it’s better to be equipped with the gear and resources you need to get to the top of that mountain. 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/08/21/pacific-northwest-cds-how-to-use-your-voice-invoke-positive-change-and-answers-to-frequently-asked-questions/ parcher

Pacific Northwest CDS: How to Use Your Voice, Invoke Positive Change, and Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

By MC1 Sarah Villegas, Office of the MCPON

Known for its sprawling mountains, pine forests, and rivers of coffee, the Pacific Northwest (PNW) is a picturesque tourist destination.

It’s also home to several navy bases — serving critical warfare areas and providing an environment for the fleet to train, repair and replenish. 

MyNavyHr recently brought Navy leadership and detailers to meet with PNW Sailors to share more on current and upcoming initiatives while giving attendees the chance to share feedback during a Career Development Symposium.


The forum was about practicing radical candor on both ends: admirals and seamen alike, being transparent about limitations and opinions respectively. Imagine having the chance to tell “them” how much you dislike a policy or have a bone to pick with the process of picking orders? Sailors were able to do just that. Rather than being penalized for criticism, they were encouraged to speak up and offer solutions as to how we can work to fix issues and improve the Navy. 

This is where the whole process starts. Leaders like MCPON, the Chief of Naval Personnel, and the commander of Navy Personnel Command hit the road to find out what you need most. They visit ships, submarines and air squadrons to see what our folks need in order to accomplish the mission, while taking care of themselves and their families. 

Fulfilling those needs may involve various types of actions such as requesting increased funding in the budget, mining for innovative ideas, to finding compromises that work best for the Sailor and the Navy at large. From their visit to the deckplates, leadership then takes feedback and new ideas back to Washington D.C. to discuss with other senior leaders, such as the Chief of Naval Operations, Secretary of the Navy, and, as necessary, congressional members.   

Admittedly, positive change and addressing some of our most vexing challenges can be a slow moving process, often requiring additional funding, approval at various levels, and congressional support.

190227-N-YG104-0026 WASHINGTON (February 27, 2019) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith departs the Russell Senate Building, near the U.S. Capitol building, after testifying on Military Personnel Policies and Military Family Readiness during a hearing before the Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Personnel. Smith shared testimonies that advocated for child care, housing, and Sailor 2025 initiatives. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 1st Class Sarah Villegas/Released)

MCPON Testifies to Congress, Advocates for Quality of Life Resources

Some issues are easier to identify and solve than others. The feedback we get from Sailors on the deck plates is only part of the equation. Other parts include Facebook Live events, questions and comments on command social media pages, external media coverage, and other types of events, for instance, the National Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment at America’s Colleges, Universities and Service Academies

From these multiple sources, themes start to emerge, priorities determined, and perspective solutions become clearer. This all results in the wheels of positive change in the Navy to begin turning internally — and the wheels are always turning whether you seem them or not. 

This is why it’s crucial that you speak up — in a constructive manner — and share your insights. More than saying “it sucks,” share your ideas on how we can make it better for you, your Sailors, your family, and everyone that follows. After all, it’s your Navy. We are fortunate to live in an era where leadership believes that your voice is critical in solving the issues at hand. And, increasingly, there a multiple avenues of communication that are easier and more direct. Sure, it might seem intimidating to stand up and ask MCPON or an admiral a question, but remember, these leaders come to listen.  

The purpose of the many efforts discussed at CDS is to remove distractions that stand in the way of readiness. “Instead of standing in line at PSD or wasting your time trying to fix your pay, we want you to be able to perfect your craft while knowing that you and your family are well cared for.” -MCPON Smith 


The Navy is home to tremendous opportunities. As with any organization, it must continuously evolve and remedy issues in order to make it better for those who are a part of it. In order to reduce administrative distractions, there are projects underway to consolidate and improve communication between databases, so that a Sailor has to input one piece of information one time. Some of these creaky databases date back decades! That’s just one example that shows the mountains we’re climbing to modernize our personnel systems.

 

Commonly Asked Questions from CDS PNW:

Q: How does the Meritorious Advancement Program affect quotas? 

A: 10 percent of the total fiscal year 2019 advancement quotas have been allocated to 2019 MAP Season Two. NAVADMIN 176/19

Q: What’s the latest on Tuition Assistance?

A: Beginning Oct. 1, 2019, enlisted Sailors and officers must complete a minimum of two years of service before becoming eligible to use TA or NCPACE instructor-led or Distance Learning (DL) courses. This requirement may not be waived. In addition, TA and NCPACE (DL) funding is capped at 12 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) per fiscal year (FY) and a total of 120 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) in a career.  Most Sailors in recent years have only used up to an average of nine semester hours annually. NAVADMIN 114/19

Q: What is the Navy doing about increasing the availability of child care? 

A: The Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), which oversees the CDCs and MCCYN, is working hard to address the child care capacity shortfalls issue. While the Navy has made significant headway to meet the demand for child care Navy-wide through the combination of military-operated and approved community-based programs, there is more work to do. In FY20, Navy has budgeted increased funding for child care to add 1,000 new spaces through community partnerships. 

Q: Why is the Navy including planks to the Navy PRT? 

A: The plank is a better test of core strength and endurance and will likely reduce lower back injuries or strain due to poor form when doing the curl-up. The plank will be a timed event with scoring based on the amount of time a Sailor can maintain the plank position. Currently, the goal is to release these changes in calendar year 2020.

Q: What about beards?

A: No changes to the current policy are being considered. Safety continues to be the primary concern. In March 2016, the Naval Safety Center conducted a study to consider how facial hair affects the proper fit of respirators worn to conduct many duties in the Navy. The results showed that in general, the presence of beards and wide sideburns had a detrimental effect on the performance of the respirators. The study concluded that facial hair interferes with the seal and degrades respirator performance.

 

Obviously some of these are of much greater importance than others — depending on your circumstances both professionally and personally. These issues aren’t to be taken lightly, because they directly correlate to the livelihood, well-being, and retention of skilled Sailors.

Even if you don’t have a CDS coming to you anytime soon, you’re encouraged to reach out and reach up. Write a point paper, send an email to (usnpeople@navy.mil), or connect with the Navy on social media to shape the future of our Navy. Not only are you allowed, but you’re encouraged to do so. 

Just as the PNW is riddled with rugged terrain and obstacles to overcome, so is your service. Anything worth doing will have its challenges — but it’s better to be equipped with the gear and resources you need to get to the top of that mountain. 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/08/21/pacific-northwest-cds-how-to-use-your-voice-invoke-positive-change-and-answers-to-frequently-asked-questions/ parcher

Refining Leadership for the Navy the Nation Needs

By Vice Adm. Robert P. Burke
Chief of Naval Personnel

You may have heard that we will convene Officer Selective Early Retirement (SER) boards for FY19. I wanted to make sure you know why we think this is necessary, and how it is critical to our People Strategy for the Navy.

The decision to hold FY19 SER boards was made after considerable thought and careful deliberation. Our growing Navy requires the most consistently reliable performers to lead and sustain a modern, ready and lethal force. We are committed to retaining and promoting the right leaders to meet tomorrow’s challenges. We’ve used a similar process in the Chief’s Mess called the Senior Enlisted Continuation Board to maintain the “gold standard” we expect from our senior enlisted leaders. The Officer SER board is the next step, one that is frankly overdue, because our Sailors deserve leaders who embody what we value as a Navy. Enforcing performance standards for Navy leaders annually sets the necessary tone and expectation for subordinates to emulate.

Enforcing performance standards for Navy leaders annually sets the necessary tone and expectation for subordinates to emulate.

Some of you may remember the FY12 SER board, and I want to assure you that this is not the same process all over again. Repeating that would make no sense while we are trying to grow our Navy. This is a new process, enabled by a revised legislative authority, and it has an entirely different purpose.

Under 10 USC 638a, updated in the FY18 NDAA, the Secretary of each military department may request authority from the Secretary of Defense to consider officers for selective early retirement who are O-5s with at least one failure of selection (FOS), or O-6s who have served in that grade for at least two years, and whose names are not on a list of officers recommended for promotion. The parameters established for the FY19 SER boards have been tightened to have the board consider O-6s with three years’ time in grade and O5s who have failed to select two or more times. The FY12 SER board was conducted under a less flexible authority (10 USC 638) which was designed to correct officer imbalances and overages from high retention, and reductions in officer billets due to downsizing. That board was provided a list of eligible officers in paygrades O-5 and O-6 to be considered, and directed to select a specific number of officers in each pay grade. The objective for the FY12 SER board was to reduce numbers of O5s and O6s, plain and simple.

For our FY19 SER boards, the updated authority allows the Secretary of the Navy to convene these boards without directing a specific number of selections. Unlike the FY12 SER board, this board WILL HAVE NO DIRECTED SELECTION QUOTA. Therefore, the board is under no obligation to select a single officer for early retirement! However, there will be performance-focused reviews meant to identify senior O-5s and O-6s whose performance, when compared with their peers, is not competitive. The Secretary of the Navy’s board convening order will provide specific guidance and criteria for conducting these reviews.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 21, 2015) Sailors conduct quarters at sunrise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class D.C. Ortega/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 21, 2015) Sailors conduct quarters at sunrise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class D.C. Ortega/Released)

 

I cannot stress enough that the approach for the pending FY19 boards is unlike the FY12 SER board, which was aimed at balancing the force by driving down inventory to comply with mandated officer reductions. The FY19 SER boards will identify and select for early retirement only those senior O5s and O6s who are under performing — which we expect will be a small number. The question all of you have on your mind is, “What does under performing mean?” We’re not talking about PFA failures — we have administrative processes for that. What we’re talking about is folks who are no longer pulling their share of the load…retired on active duty…pick your colloquialism. A more important example would be officers who have demonstrated they don’t have the character or the will to lead at the senior level. Additionally, while the FY12 SER board looked only at the Unrestricted Line, all competitive categories (URL/Restricted Line (RL)/Staff Corps), regardless of manning levels, will benefit from a quality review during the FY19 SER boards.

Since there is no required selection quota, the review will not favor or disadvantage any one community over another, regardless of manning level.  To reiterate that key point — there are no selection quotas for these SER boards — selecting zero officers in a competitive category is a possible outcome. If the board identifies no officers who meet the underperforming criteria, there is no requirement to select anyone for early retirement.

Bottom line, I would ask you not to start calling your detailer asking if they think you will be selected or dropping your retirement papers tomorrow.  As with other Navy boards, the FY19 SER will be conducted in a fair, deliberate manner, adhering to the same strict guidelines to ensure the sanctity of the board process.

Sailors are the foundation of our Navy and our People Strategy hinges on attracting and retaining top talent. Our workforce deserves leaders who continue to perform. The FY19 SER is a key initiative to refine and strengthen our team, and will have a positive impact on individual communities and the Navy as a whole.

The FY19 SER is a key initiative to refine and strengthen our team, and will have a positive impact on individual communities and the Navy as a whole.

So, let’s jump into some questions I suspect you may have:

 Should officers submit a retirement request in order to avoid the board?

No, not if they are performing their job well and are in good standing.

 If an O-5 or O-6 is selected to retire as a result of this board, what will be the retirement grade and pay?

Since officers being reviewed under this board have been at their current pay grade for at least three years, they will retire at their current pay grade.

 What is the total number of individual SER boards that will be held?

Separate FY19 SER boards will be held by paygrade and competitive category (URL/RL/Staff Corps). Based on the number of designators and factoring in that we’ll hold boards for both O5 and O6 officers, the total is 41 boards.

Will those O-5s and O-6s being looked at for this board be notified prior to the start of the board?

Yes. NAVADMIN 193/18 identifies the zone of officers whose records will be considered and reviewed by the SER boards. The notice identifies the senior eligible and junior eligible officers in each competitive category to be considered by the board.

 Do these officers know they have not met performance standards? 

The board will review how well an individual is performing as documented in their record. Individuals have access to their records and are encouraged to review them periodically. It is also standard for every officer to receive mid-term and annual fitness report (FITREP) counseling about their performance.

By law, officers selected by a SER board must be retired no later than the first day of the seventh month beginning after the month the Secretary of the Navy approves the board report. Can someone selected retire prior to that month?

Yes. Officers selected for early retirement are eligible to retire as early as they can complete the prerequisite separation courses and medical/dental examinations for transition and retirement.

 Did the Navy evaluate the impacts to individual communities that this process will have?

Yes, we expect these boards will have a positive impact on individual communities and the Navy as a whole because they will reinforce the Navy’s expectation that senior officers continue to perform at a level comparable to their peers within their pay grade. Additionally, the selected early retirement of officers due to an insufficient level of performance may create opportunities for talented junior officers to move up sooner and assume senior leadership positions.

 How many O-5s and O-6s will be looked at for the FY 2019 board? 

As of May 2018, 2,611 officers will be looked at for the FY19 SER (O5: 441 URL and 548 RL, O6: 694 URL and 928 RL). These numbers do not include officers who subsequently request voluntary retirement which would make them exempt from consideration. Since the boards will be held by pay grade and competitive category (URL/RL/Staff Corps), there will be a total of 41 individual boards. By statute, no more than 30 percent of any competitive category can be selected for early retirement, but we do not envision coming close to this cap and zero selections in a competitive category is acceptable.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/08/09/refining-leadership-for-the-navy-the-nation-needs/ U.S. Navy

@USNPeople Weekly Wire Rundown: Feb. 21, 2017

The Weekly Wire Rundown is a weekly video blog from the Office of the Chief of Naval Personnel, highlighting the top stories affecting Sailors and their families. The video compliments the print edition of the @USNPeople Weekly Wire, which you can subscribe to by e-mailing usnpeople.fct@navy.mil. It can also be downloaded at www.navy.mil/cnp. We welcome any question and feedback on personnel matters or how to make this product better serve Sailors and their families.

Watch and let us know what you think in the comments below.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/02/21/usnpeople-weekly-wire-rundown-feb-21-2017/ U.S. Navy

@USNPeople Weekly Wire Rundown: Feb. 21, 2017

The Weekly Wire Rundown is a weekly video blog from the Office of the Chief of Naval Personnel, highlighting the top stories affecting Sailors and their families. The video compliments the print edition of the @USNPeople Weekly Wire, which you can subscribe to by e-mailing usnpeople.fct@navy.mil. It can also be downloaded at www.navy.mil/cnp. We welcome any question and feedback on personnel matters or how to make this product better serve Sailors and their families.

Watch and let us know what you think in the comments below.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/02/21/usnpeople-weekly-wire-rundown-feb-21-2017/ U.S. Navy