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Category Archives: U.S. Navy

Navy Recruit Graduation: October 4, 2019

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of Recruit Training Command’s graduation, Pass-In-Review. It is a formal military ceremony that honors a Sailor’s hard work and dedication to a new way of life. Pass-In-Review also ties together the future of the Navy with our long-held naval traditions and customs.

Read how Recruit Training Command transforms civilians into Sailors – 38,000 of them each year.

The live video from the Navy’s only boot camp at Great Lakes, Illinois, is scheduled to begin 8:45 a.m. CST Oct. 4.

Congratulations Sailors and welcome aboard to the newest members of our Navy family!

Join in the story of four recruits as they make their way into the Navy through the training pipeline, never before so intimately profiled, of the Navy’s Recruit Training Command in All Hands Magazine’s documentary “Making a Sailor.”

Join the #USNavy conversation on social media on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and Flickr.

Congratulate the Navy’s newest Sailors by leaving a comment below.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/10/04/navy-recruit-graduation-october-04-2019/ U.S. Navy

Pacific Northwest CDS: How to Use Your Voice, Invoke Positive Change, and Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

By MC1 Sarah Villegas, Office of the MCPON

Known for its sprawling mountains, pine forests, and rivers of coffee, the Pacific Northwest (PNW) is a picturesque tourist destination.

It’s also home to several navy bases — serving critical warfare areas and providing an environment for the fleet to train, repair and replenish. 

MyNavyHr recently brought Navy leadership and detailers to meet with PNW Sailors to share more on current and upcoming initiatives while giving attendees the chance to share feedback during a Career Development Symposium.


The forum was about practicing radical candor on both ends: admirals and seamen alike, being transparent about limitations and opinions respectively. Imagine having the chance to tell “them” how much you dislike a policy or have a bone to pick with the process of picking orders? Sailors were able to do just that. Rather than being penalized for criticism, they were encouraged to speak up and offer solutions as to how we can work to fix issues and improve the Navy. 

This is where the whole process starts. Leaders like MCPON, the Chief of Naval Personnel, and the commander of Navy Personnel Command hit the road to find out what you need most. They visit ships, submarines and air squadrons to see what our folks need in order to accomplish the mission, while taking care of themselves and their families. 

Fulfilling those needs may involve various types of actions such as requesting increased funding in the budget, mining for innovative ideas, to finding compromises that work best for the Sailor and the Navy at large. From their visit to the deckplates, leadership then takes feedback and new ideas back to Washington D.C. to discuss with other senior leaders, such as the Chief of Naval Operations, Secretary of the Navy, and, as necessary, congressional members.   

Admittedly, positive change and addressing some of our most vexing challenges can be a slow moving process, often requiring additional funding, approval at various levels, and congressional support.

190227-N-YG104-0026 WASHINGTON (February 27, 2019) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith departs the Russell Senate Building, near the U.S. Capitol building, after testifying on Military Personnel Policies and Military Family Readiness during a hearing before the Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Personnel. Smith shared testimonies that advocated for child care, housing, and Sailor 2025 initiatives. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 1st Class Sarah Villegas/Released)

MCPON Testifies to Congress, Advocates for Quality of Life Resources

Some issues are easier to identify and solve than others. The feedback we get from Sailors on the deck plates is only part of the equation. Other parts include Facebook Live events, questions and comments on command social media pages, external media coverage, and other types of events, for instance, the National Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment at America’s Colleges, Universities and Service Academies

From these multiple sources, themes start to emerge, priorities determined, and perspective solutions become clearer. This all results in the wheels of positive change in the Navy to begin turning internally — and the wheels are always turning whether you seem them or not. 

This is why it’s crucial that you speak up — in a constructive manner — and share your insights. More than saying “it sucks,” share your ideas on how we can make it better for you, your Sailors, your family, and everyone that follows. After all, it’s your Navy. We are fortunate to live in an era where leadership believes that your voice is critical in solving the issues at hand. And, increasingly, there a multiple avenues of communication that are easier and more direct. Sure, it might seem intimidating to stand up and ask MCPON or an admiral a question, but remember, these leaders come to listen.  

The purpose of the many efforts discussed at CDS is to remove distractions that stand in the way of readiness. “Instead of standing in line at PSD or wasting your time trying to fix your pay, we want you to be able to perfect your craft while knowing that you and your family are well cared for.” -MCPON Smith 


The Navy is home to tremendous opportunities. As with any organization, it must continuously evolve and remedy issues in order to make it better for those who are a part of it. In order to reduce administrative distractions, there are projects underway to consolidate and improve communication between databases, so that a Sailor has to input one piece of information one time. Some of these creaky databases date back decades! That’s just one example that shows the mountains we’re climbing to modernize our personnel systems.

Commonly Asked Questions from CDS PNW:

Q: How does the Meritorious Advancement Program affect quotas? 

A: 10 percent of the total fiscal year 2019 advancement quotas have been allocated to 2019 MAP Season Two. NAVADMIN 176/19

Q: What’s the latest on Tuition Assistance?

A: Beginning Oct. 1, 2019, enlisted Sailors and officers must complete a minimum of two years of service before becoming eligible to use TA or NCPACE instructor-led or Distance Learning (DL) courses. This requirement may not be waived. In addition, TA and NCPACE (DL) funding is capped at 12 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) per fiscal year (FY) and a total of 120 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) in a career.  Most Sailors in recent years have only used up to an average of nine semester hours annually. NAVADMIN 114/19

Q: What is the Navy doing about increasing the availability of child care? 

A: The Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), which oversees the CDCs and MCCYN, is working hard to address the child care capacity shortfalls issue. While the Navy has made significant headway to meet the demand for child care Navy-wide through the combination of military-operated and approved community-based programs, there is more work to do. In FY20, Navy has budgeted increased funding for child care to add 1,000 new spaces through community partnerships. 

Q: Why is the Navy including planks to the Navy PRT? 

A: The plank is a better test of core strength and endurance and will likely reduce lower back injuries or strain due to poor form when doing the curl-up. The plank will be a timed event with scoring based on the amount of time a Sailor can maintain the plank position. Currently, the goal is to release these changes in calendar year 2020.

Q: What about beards?

A: No changes to the current policy are being considered. Safety continues to be the primary concern. In March 2016, the Naval Safety Center conducted a study to consider how facial hair affects the proper fit of respirators worn to conduct many duties in the Navy. The results showed that in general, the presence of beards and wide sideburns had a detrimental effect on the performance of the respirators. The study concluded that facial hair interferes with the seal and degrades respirator performance.

Obviously some of these are of much greater importance than others — depending on your circumstances both professionally and personally. These issues aren’t to be taken lightly, because they directly correlate to the livelihood, well-being, and retention of skilled Sailors.

Even if you don’t have a CDS coming to you anytime soon, you’re encouraged to reach out and reach up. Write a point paper, send an email to (usnpeople@navy.mil), or connect with the Navy on social media to shape the future of our Navy. Not only are you allowed, but you’re encouraged to do so. 

Just as the PNW is riddled with rugged terrain and obstacles to overcome, so is your service. Anything worth doing will have its challenges — but it’s better to be equipped with the gear and resources you need to get to the top of that mountain. 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/08/21/pacific-northwest-cds-how-to-use-your-voice-invoke-positive-change-and-answers-to-frequently-asked-questions/ parcher

Pacific Northwest CDS: How to Use Your Voice, Invoke Positive Change, and Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

By MC1 Sarah Villegas, Office of the MCPON

Known for its sprawling mountains, pine forests, and rivers of coffee, the Pacific Northwest (PNW) is a picturesque tourist destination.

It’s also home to several navy bases — serving critical warfare areas and providing an environment for the fleet to train, repair and replenish. 

MyNavyHr recently brought Navy leadership and detailers to meet with PNW Sailors to share more on current and upcoming initiatives while giving attendees the chance to share feedback during a Career Development Symposium.


The forum was about practicing radical candor on both ends: admirals and seamen alike, being transparent about limitations and opinions respectively. Imagine having the chance to tell “them” how much you dislike a policy or have a bone to pick with the process of picking orders? Sailors were able to do just that. Rather than being penalized for criticism, they were encouraged to speak up and offer solutions as to how we can work to fix issues and improve the Navy. 

This is where the whole process starts. Leaders like MCPON, the Chief of Naval Personnel, and the commander of Navy Personnel Command hit the road to find out what you need most. They visit ships, submarines and air squadrons to see what our folks need in order to accomplish the mission, while taking care of themselves and their families. 

Fulfilling those needs may involve various types of actions such as requesting increased funding in the budget, mining for innovative ideas, to finding compromises that work best for the Sailor and the Navy at large. From their visit to the deckplates, leadership then takes feedback and new ideas back to Washington D.C. to discuss with other senior leaders, such as the Chief of Naval Operations, Secretary of the Navy, and, as necessary, congressional members.   

Admittedly, positive change and addressing some of our most vexing challenges can be a slow moving process, often requiring additional funding, approval at various levels, and congressional support.

190227-N-YG104-0026 WASHINGTON (February 27, 2019) Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith departs the Russell Senate Building, near the U.S. Capitol building, after testifying on Military Personnel Policies and Military Family Readiness during a hearing before the Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Personnel. Smith shared testimonies that advocated for child care, housing, and Sailor 2025 initiatives. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 1st Class Sarah Villegas/Released)

MCPON Testifies to Congress, Advocates for Quality of Life Resources

Some issues are easier to identify and solve than others. The feedback we get from Sailors on the deck plates is only part of the equation. Other parts include Facebook Live events, questions and comments on command social media pages, external media coverage, and other types of events, for instance, the National Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment at America’s Colleges, Universities and Service Academies

From these multiple sources, themes start to emerge, priorities determined, and perspective solutions become clearer. This all results in the wheels of positive change in the Navy to begin turning internally — and the wheels are always turning whether you seem them or not. 

This is why it’s crucial that you speak up — in a constructive manner — and share your insights. More than saying “it sucks,” share your ideas on how we can make it better for you, your Sailors, your family, and everyone that follows. After all, it’s your Navy. We are fortunate to live in an era where leadership believes that your voice is critical in solving the issues at hand. And, increasingly, there a multiple avenues of communication that are easier and more direct. Sure, it might seem intimidating to stand up and ask MCPON or an admiral a question, but remember, these leaders come to listen.  

The purpose of the many efforts discussed at CDS is to remove distractions that stand in the way of readiness. “Instead of standing in line at PSD or wasting your time trying to fix your pay, we want you to be able to perfect your craft while knowing that you and your family are well cared for.” -MCPON Smith 


The Navy is home to tremendous opportunities. As with any organization, it must continuously evolve and remedy issues in order to make it better for those who are a part of it. In order to reduce administrative distractions, there are projects underway to consolidate and improve communication between databases, so that a Sailor has to input one piece of information one time. Some of these creaky databases date back decades! That’s just one example that shows the mountains we’re climbing to modernize our personnel systems.

 

Commonly Asked Questions from CDS PNW:

Q: How does the Meritorious Advancement Program affect quotas? 

A: 10 percent of the total fiscal year 2019 advancement quotas have been allocated to 2019 MAP Season Two. NAVADMIN 176/19

Q: What’s the latest on Tuition Assistance?

A: Beginning Oct. 1, 2019, enlisted Sailors and officers must complete a minimum of two years of service before becoming eligible to use TA or NCPACE instructor-led or Distance Learning (DL) courses. This requirement may not be waived. In addition, TA and NCPACE (DL) funding is capped at 12 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) per fiscal year (FY) and a total of 120 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) in a career.  Most Sailors in recent years have only used up to an average of nine semester hours annually. NAVADMIN 114/19

Q: What is the Navy doing about increasing the availability of child care? 

A: The Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), which oversees the CDCs and MCCYN, is working hard to address the child care capacity shortfalls issue. While the Navy has made significant headway to meet the demand for child care Navy-wide through the combination of military-operated and approved community-based programs, there is more work to do. In FY20, Navy has budgeted increased funding for child care to add 1,000 new spaces through community partnerships. 

Q: Why is the Navy including planks to the Navy PRT? 

A: The plank is a better test of core strength and endurance and will likely reduce lower back injuries or strain due to poor form when doing the curl-up. The plank will be a timed event with scoring based on the amount of time a Sailor can maintain the plank position. Currently, the goal is to release these changes in calendar year 2020.

Q: What about beards?

A: No changes to the current policy are being considered. Safety continues to be the primary concern. In March 2016, the Naval Safety Center conducted a study to consider how facial hair affects the proper fit of respirators worn to conduct many duties in the Navy. The results showed that in general, the presence of beards and wide sideburns had a detrimental effect on the performance of the respirators. The study concluded that facial hair interferes with the seal and degrades respirator performance.

 

Obviously some of these are of much greater importance than others — depending on your circumstances both professionally and personally. These issues aren’t to be taken lightly, because they directly correlate to the livelihood, well-being, and retention of skilled Sailors.

Even if you don’t have a CDS coming to you anytime soon, you’re encouraged to reach out and reach up. Write a point paper, send an email to (usnpeople@navy.mil), or connect with the Navy on social media to shape the future of our Navy. Not only are you allowed, but you’re encouraged to do so. 

Just as the PNW is riddled with rugged terrain and obstacles to overcome, so is your service. Anything worth doing will have its challenges — but it’s better to be equipped with the gear and resources you need to get to the top of that mountain. 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/08/21/pacific-northwest-cds-how-to-use-your-voice-invoke-positive-change-and-answers-to-frequently-asked-questions/ parcher

Innovation Boosts Fleet Readiness

In the new age of warfare, Navy has been using modern technologies to solve problems demonstrating the potential to increase fleet readiness even further and strengthen our Navy for the future.

Whether it’s additive manufacturing, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, unmanned systems or mobile applications, Navy has been implementing the newest technologies and increasing the rate of technological creation in the face of great power competition.

Make sure to bookmark and frequently visit this page to learn more about how Navy’s adoption of advanced technology helps to modernize the fleet, restore readiness, increase lethality, generate higher operational tempo, lower costs and build capacity for the future fight.

3D MEDICAL APPLICATIONS CENTER: Software and Digital Application

In the video below, see how Navy medicine is using advanced software technologies utilized by 3D printers to create devices and prosthesis at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Maryland.

  • NAVSEA TIIL Gets Cold Spray Down Cold (July 10, 2019)

KEYPORT, Washington (NNS) — The Naval Sea Systems Command’s Tactical Innovation Implementation Labsprinted toward the future with the Cold Spray Sprint in January, an effort that kicked off the deployment of cutting-edge cold spray technology to shipyards and depot-level maintenance centers. Read more on Navy.mil

  • NAVWAR Enterprise Launches Artificial Intelligence Prize Challenge with $150,000 Offerred in Prizes (July 9, 2019) 

SAN DIEGO, Calif. (NNS) — The Navy kicked off the Artificial Intelligence Applications to Autonomous Cybersecurity Challenge, a prize competition seeking innovative machine learning and artificial intelligence solutions for real-world cybersecurity challenges. Read more on Navy.mil

  • Navy Data Platform Consolidates Business Intelligence Capabilities  (July 9, 2019)

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. (NNS) — Naval Supply Systems Command Business Systems Center launched Navy Data Platform, a standardized business intelligence and data platform that supports Navy supply-chain data-analytic capabilities. Read more on Navy.mil 

  • Eye on Innovation: Making Huge Strides in Virtual Reality at Norfolk Naval Shipyard  (July 3, 2019)

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) — Imagine conducting ship checks and training aboard a ship without ever leaving your office. At Norfolk Naval Shipyard, this has become a reality thanks to virtual reality. Read more on Navy.mil

UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS LABORATORY

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division’s Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Laboratory, based under the Sea-Based Aviation and Aeromechanics Branch, develops UAS for the maritime mobility mission of Carderock. This is a video feature on the lab, located at West Bethesda, Maryland.

 

  • Junior Navy Scientists, Engineers Develop Integration Capability for Electric Weapons   (June 13, 2019)

DAHLGREN, Va. (NNS) — Six junior Navy technologists recently out of college proved the potential of their project known as PEGASUS (Power and Energy Generation Analysis SimUlation System) to integrate electric weapons and electric propulsion systems aboard Navy ships. Read more on Navy.mil 

  • Navy’s 3D Submarine Radio Room Training Technology Adapted for USMC Tactical Communicators  (June 13, 2019)

CHARLESTON, S.C. (NNS) — Naval Information Warfare Center Atlantic developed and fielded 3D virtual training technology traditionally used by Navy submariners as part of a New Equipment Training package designed for U.S. Marine Corps communicators. Read more on Navy.mil

  • Laser Focus: ONR Global and the Competition for High-Intensity Lasers (June 4, 2019)

ARLINGTON, Va. (NNS) — In the 1990s, the United States was the leading innovator and dominant user of high-intensity laser technology, according to a 2017 report published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. Read more on Navy.mil

  • Carderock’s McAllister Talks Future of Unmanned Vehicles  (May 28, 2019)

WEST BETHESDA, Md. (NNS) — Before the turn of the century, futurists imagined today looking something like an episode of “The Jetsons,” with robots doing the dull and dirty work in every home, and pilotless flying cars providing seamless transportation. Read more on Navy.mil

  • Marines Make Virtual Training Reality for Naval Aviators  (May 20, 2019)

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas (NNS) — The dream of becoming jet pilots was almost within their reach. Self-confessed mechanical engineering geeks, the Occhipinti brothers commissioned as second lieutenants in the United States Marine Corps in 2013. Read more on Navy.mil

  • NAVSEA and NUWC Division, Keyport’s 3D Blueprint for the Future  (May 16, 2019)

KEYPORT, Washington (NNS) — Naval Sea Systems Command Tactical Innovation Implementation Lab is advancing and maturing additive manufacturing (AM, also known as 3D printing) technology into the naval shipyards to support the fleet through Print Sprint II. Read more on Navy.mil

  • NRL Introduces Newly Acquired Aircraft for Airborne Research  (May 14, 2019)

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and the Navy’s premier science and technology research squadron, Scientific Development Squadron ONE (VXS-1), unveiled the UV-18 “Twin Otter” as the newest addition to the squadron’s unique fleet of aircraft research platforms. Read more on Navy.mil

The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory™s exclusive science and technology research squadron, Scientific Development Squadron ONE (VXS-1), Warlocks, add the twin engine, Twin Otter aircraft to their versatile fleet, which include three NP-3C and P-3C Orions, an RC-12 King Air, and 12 TigerShark Unmanned Aircraft Systems.
  • NAVSUP Showcases Innovation at Sea Air Space Expo 2019  (May 6, 2019)

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. (NNS) — Naval Supply Systems Command showcases innovative technology and processes at this year’s Sea Air Space Exposition, May 6-8, in National Harbor, Maryland. Read more on Navy.mil

  • Modernization Takes Navy Enterprise Resource Planning to the Cloud  (May 6, 2019)

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. (NNS) — From purchase request to final delivery, a well-coordinated orchestra of technology and people work in harmony to ensure Navy supply-chain integrity. Read more on Navy.mil

  • Data, Web, and Artificial Intelligence: Navy’s Next Frontier  (May 6, 2019)

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. (NNS) — As information technology rapidly advances, the use of mobile applications and artificial intelligence will continue to impact Navy decision-makers well into the future. Read more on Navy.mil

  • Mobile Devices Enhance Navy Inventory Control  (May 6, 2019)

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. (NNS) — Navy Mobile Computing teams from Naval Supply Systems Command Business Systems Center are deploying mobile technology and support to deliver improved logistics readiness to the fleet. Read more on Navy.mil

  • NUWC Division, Keyport Strives to Leap Ahead in Virtual Reality  (May 2, 2019)

KEYPORT, Wa. (NNS) — The Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Keyport is bringing what used to be science fiction to the world of science fact through the development of practical augmented reality and virtual reality technology. Read more on Navy.mil

  • Eye on Innovation: NNSY T&I Lab Hosts Shipyard Sharing Program  (May 1, 2019)

PORTSMOUTH, VA (NNS) — The Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) Technology and Innovation Lab strives to break down barriers and bring technologies of the shipyard to the forefront, aiding employees who aim to make their jobs safer and more efficient through NNSY’s Innovation Program. Read more on Navy.mil

 

Follow this page to learn more about Navy’s adoption of advanced technology.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/07/15/innovation-boosts-fleet-readiness/ poyrazdogany

Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas B. Modly Remarks at The Patuxent Partnership

Below are Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly’s remarks at The Patuxent Partnership, May 15, 2019 in St. Mary’s City, Maryland. Thank you, Bonnie, for that kind introduction. And thanks for inviting us here tonight. What a wonderful evening and event to recognize the leadership of this community of service. Some of you may know that Robyn and I live in Annapolis, and it has much the same feel as St. Mary’s, one of neighbors and friendship and support. We raised our four children there, who are now well embarked on their careers, and we think often of the wonderful, nurturing community they grew up in; that one day we may have to leave behind, and neither of us looks forward to that day. Last Sunday was of course Mother’s Day, and I can’t help but think of all the mothers here tonight – the capacity to raise daughters and sons who want to serve a cause greater than self, whether in or out of uniform, is something very dear to our American way of life. Many of you are part of the larger family of military and naval service, something of which Robyn and I are especially proud. Robyn and I met just before my last flight in the UH-1N Huey on board USS NASSAU. So we happened to miss the deployments and long separation while serving on the ship although Robyn may have wished for one or two deployments on occasion. And after leaving NASSAU, we settled in Colorado Springs, where I took a job as an assistant professor of political science at the U.S Air Force Academy. Teaching those cadets, especially during early morning classes, I would have to resort to some pretty creative and sometimes even devious means of capturing their attention. Maybe like many of you, in the late 1980s, I would try to stay awake past 11:30 pm to watch “Late Night with David Letterman.” But almost every night before teaching class, I would make sure to catch Dave’s “Top Ten” before I went to bed. Because there were many times, in those Top Ten lists, I would find something interesting to mention in class that related to whatever we were studying at the time. So when I thought the same about addressing you here tonight – I asked myself, what would make my Top Ten list today?

What would be in the Top Ten, say, of my concerns about our Navy and Marine Corps team and where we fit in the future international security environment.

Secretary Mattis was once asked, “What keeps you up at night?” He answered, “Nothing. I keep other people up at night.” I would have to say mine would not be quite so self-confident. I would probably answer, “Nothing, I am too tired to be kept up at night.” So my challenge tonight is not just to tell you what might keep me up at night, if anything could, but rather to talk about what will keep you awake during this speech. So, I will rely on my old tried and true David Letterman technique and give you a Top Ten list. Unfortunately, my list won’t be nearly as humorous as Letterman’s lists used to be, and there may not be many surprises, either, but you never know. If you asked me to give you this list on November 16th, 2017, the day before I was confirmed by the U.S. Senate for this job, I am pretty sure the list would be different. So it has been evolving over time and I will try to capsulize each one with just one word – in case you want to take notes on your napkin. But here goes… imagine the drum roll…. The Under Secretary of the Navy’s top ten words that if things kept me up at night it would be these 10 words: Number 10: 355 Number 9:  Speed Number 8:  Information Number 7:  Cost Number 6:  Audit Number 5: Education Number 4: Warriors Number 3: Adversaries Number 2: Time And…Number 1: Memories Now I am certain this last one may sound a bit perplexing to you. Memories? Memories of what? What I am referring to is our collective memories as a nation. The common understanding of what is good about this place and what makes it so unique in the history of civilization. In 1984 Ronald Reagan captured this idea on the cliffs of Point Du Hoc in Normandy on the 40th anniversary of the D-Day invasion of Europe by Allied Forces. Political analysts have used this speech to describe how brilliant it was “politically” because it tapped into a shared understanding of what Americans believed in their hearts, and their shared memories, about the sacrifices, and the reasons for the sacrifices, made by our brave soldiers, sailors and airman on that day. Reagan’s words were far more than political, however, and to judge them purely as such diminishes their power and authenticity. The memory of Normandy that President Reagan evoked was real, not fabricated, it tapped into a collective consciousness in which moral clarity and pride in American sacrifice and achievement were unambiguous.

So why is “memory” number one on the list of the things that would keep up at night if things actually kept me up at night? Because it keeps me up every waking hour with concern that we may be losing that shared memory as a nation, as powerful forces in the media, politics, academia, and nefarious foreign actors who are adept at manipulating all of these institutions, seek to create a new shared memory for Americans focused on our historical flaws, our past injustices, our cultural and racial differences, and our inability to secure an impossible utopian ideal for our society.

This year, I have the pleasure to meet Mr. Emory Crowder. Emory is a 95-year-old veteran of World War II. Emory was a corpsman in the Marine Corps. He stormed the beaches in Saipan and Tinian, and for his bravery, he was rewarded with the opportunity to invade Okinawa. He never made it, as his ship was sunk by a Kamikaze pilot and he was rescued from the cold Pacific Ocean a few hours later. I invited Emory to join Robyn and me at the Messiah concert in Annapolis this December. After the concert, he was surrounded by midshipmen who took pictures with him and thanked him for his service. In response to these midshipmen, all of whom were born well after the Berlin Wall came tumbling down, Emory simply said, “Thank you, I did it so that you could have THIS life.” This is what is GOOD about this nation. This is the shared memory we should all embrace to resist the forces that seek to erode our confidence in our ideals and our principles.

To quote Secretary Mattis again, in responding to a particularly bad day in Afghanistan where our troops made some targeting mistakes that lead to the loss of innocent civilians, Secretary Mattis said, “We are not the perfect guys, but we are the GOOD guys.”

Now more than ever we need to believe this about ourselves. Now more than ever, we need to do everything we can to make sure this is also THE TRUTH. And if you need to be reminded why this is so important, let me give you one final example. I would like to tell you, as many of you may already know, about Senior Chief Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive) Shannon M. Kent. Leaders like Senior Chief Kent, and supporters like each of you, are what keeps America safe and free. We cannot ask people to defend this nation if we don’t believe the nation is good and worth defending. In my opinion, it is immoral to do so. We need to embrace fully, and nurture the shared memories of the past that reinforce this, not blindly, but with a renewed sense of belief that we can address our problems, and strive for a more perfect union each day — a union that is worthy of the sacrifices of people like Emory Crowder and Shannon Kent, and every other soul who puts his or her life in harm’s way to keep us safe — and free. Thank you for your service, may God bless you all, and may God continue to bless this nation. Go Navy, Go NAS Pax River, and of course, as always, BEAT ARMY.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/06/05/under-secretary-of-the-navy-thomas-b-modly-remarks-at-the-patuxent-partnership/ U.S. Navy

The Union Jack is Back

 

“Today across the Navy, at morning colors, ships are hoisting the traditional Union Jack. A version of this Jack that flew in ports throughout the Pacific as the Navy island hopped its way across that vast ocean and in the Atlantic as it supported operations to liberate the European continent. It’s deeply connected to our maritime heritage and our rise as a global nation and our continued role as a global superpower.” – CNO ADMIRAL JOHN M. RICHARDSON at the Battle of Midway Sea of White Commemoration – June 4th, 2019

 

Stories:

Navy Returns to Flying Union Jack  2/21/2019 – Chief of Naval Operations Public Affairs

 

Photos from Around the Fleet 

Next Prev

 

190604-N-AY174-1042
NORFOLK, Va. (June 4, 2019) Airman Khaila Williams, from Jacksonville Fla., left, and Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Aaron Fox, from Greenbrier, Ark., hoist the Union Jack on the flag staff aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Ike is currently in the basic phase of the Optimized Fleet Response Plan. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Brianna Thompson)

 

Electronics Technician (Radio) 3rd Class Ronald Champion, from Los Angeles, unfurls the Union Jack during morning colors aboard USS Chicago (SSN 721) June 4, 2019. Nearly all ships and craft throughout the U.S. Navy displayed the Union Jack in lieu of the First Navy Jack in commemoration of the greatest naval battle in history, the Battle of Midway, which began this day in 1942. The change re-establishes the custom in which the commissioned ship in active status having the longest total period of active status, other than USS Constitution will display the First Navy Jack until decommissioned or transferred to inactive status. Home ported at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Chicago is the 34th Los Angels-class nuclear powered attack submarine and was commissioned on September 27, 1986. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Patrick Dille)

 

190604-GZ947-0134 PEARL HARBOR (June 4, 2019) Quartermaster Seaman Apprentice Jacob Wenzel, from Saginaw, Mich., walks away after raising the union jack aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93). The union jack hasn’t been flown on U.S. ships since May 31, 2002 but was reintroduced in coordination with the 77th anniversary of the Battle of Midway. The union jack, comprising the national ensign’s blue field and white stars, was first adopted on June 14, 1777. At this time, the jack’s blue field only displayed the 13 stars representing the union of the original 13 American colonies. The number of stars on the jack was periodically updated as the United States expanded. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kenneth Rodriguez Santiago/Released)

 

190604-GZ947-0097 PEARL HARBOR (June 4, 2019) Quartermaster Seaman Apprentice Jacob Wenzel, from Saginaw, Mich., raises the union jack aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93). The union jack hasn’t been flown on U.S. ships since May 31, 2002, but was reintroduced in coordination with the 77th anniversary of the Battle of Midway. The union jack, comprising the national ensign’s blue field and white stars, was first adopted on June 14, 1777. At this time, the jack’s blue field only displayed the 13 stars representing the union of the original 13 American colonies. The number of stars on the jack was periodically updated as the United States expanded. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kenneth Rodriguez Santiago/Released)
190604-N-RQ450-0020 NORFOLK (Jun. 4, 2019) Quartermaster Seaman Trevor Gilchrist prepares to unfold the Union Jack during morning colors on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Harry S. Truman is currently moored at Naval Station Norfolk conducting targeted maintenance and trainings, and remains operationally ready. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Victoria Sutton/Released)

 

BOSTON (June 4, 2019) The union jack flies on USS Constitution’s jack staff. Navy ships and craft resumed flying the union jack June 4, 2019 to commemorate the 77th anniversary of the Battle of Midway, and will continue to fly the flag to recommit to the core attributes of integrity, accountability, initiative and toughness during this new era of competition

 

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BOSTON (June 4, 2019) The union jack flies on USS Constitution’s jack staff. Navy ships and craft resumed flying the union jack June 4, 2019 to commemorate the 77th anniversary of the Battle of Midway, and will continue to fly the flag to recommit to the core attributes of integrity, accountability, initiative and toughness during this new era of competition. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey Scoular/Released)

 

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NORFOLK, Va. (June 4, 2019) Airman Khaila Williams, from Jacksonville Fla., left, and Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Aaron Fox, from Greenbrier, Ark., prepare to hoist the Union Jack on the flag staff aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Ike is currently in the basic phase of the Optimized Fleet Response Plan. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Brianna Thompson)

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The_Jack_is_Back.mp4

In case you missed it: “Today across the Navy, at morning colors, ships are hoisting the traditional Union Jack … it’s deeply connected to our maritime heritage and our rise as a global nation and our continued role as a global superpower.” – Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson

Posted by U.S. Navy on Wednesday, June 5, 2019

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/06/05/the-union-jack-is-back/ parcher

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Returns To Sea

By Rear Adm. Roy Kelley,
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

Today, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) returned to sea for the first time in more than 18 months, officially marking the end of the ship’s Planned Incremental Availability (PIA).

For Sailor and shipyard worker alike, the conclusion of this maintenance period signifies the completion of many months of teambuilding, hard work, and coordination. In short, the ship is greater today than it was when it first arrived at NNSY in August, 2017.

Completing PIA, however, is only the first step in preparing Ike for being operationally ready. Having completed the maintenance phase of the Optimized Fleet Response Plan (OFRP), this capital warship must now prepare to do what carriers do: train to conduct prompt and sustained combat operations at sea.

This is crucial in our renewed era of great power competition with aggressors that threaten our Nation and our way of life. Mighty Ike being able to head out to sea again is truly a win for us all. It means Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 can get after it and be prepared to “fight tonight,” projecting combat-striking power anywhere, anytime.

Ike rejoins the operational waterfront in the company of giants. USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) remains in the sustainment phase of OFRP, ready to go when called upon. USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) is in the integration phase, training with elements of her carrier strike group for their upcoming deployment. Together, they demonstrate the maneuverability, adaptability and strength of the United States Navy.

Our Sailors operate worldwide, quite often far from our Nation’s shorelines. We owe these professional warfighters highly capable ships and aircraft, advanced equipment, and the most relevant training available. Today, I am proud to say Mighty Ike brings one piece of that complex picture into focus. As the ship’s motto goes she is truly, “Greater Each Day.”

Welcome back Ike!

 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/03/28/uss-dwight-d-eisenhower-returns-to-sea/ U.S. Navy

Sailing side by side the JMSDF–Strengthening Interoperability with a key Ally!

By Rear Adm. Karl Thomas, Commander, Task Force 70

“Launch the alert 15, side 203, initial vector 240” crackles over the 1MC (the ship’s loudspeaker system) early in the morning.  An unknown air contact has been detected and is closing the force. Sailors from the U.S. Navy and Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) spring into action across the strike group. U.S. Navy pilots and aircrew scramble to their jets, U.S. Navy and JMSDF leadership discuss the threat on the watch floor onboard USS Ronald Reagan, and radars from U.S. and Japanese ships probe the sky for the contact. In this case the unknown air contact was just one of many training scenarios the Ronald Reagan Strike Group conducted with the JMSDF this past week demonstrating some very real interoperability. JMSDF Commander, Escort Division (CCD) 6 and JS Kirishima joined our Battle Force alongside USS Antietam, USS Benfold, USS Milius and USS Curtis Wilbur and fulfilled air, surface and subsurface responsibilities, increasing the overall strength of our aggregated force.

As an E-2 Hawkeye aviator, I spent much of my career managing aircraft across warfare areas and building situational awareness for the Strike Group Commander.  I enjoyed having that responsibility to manage the big picture.  Now, it doesn’t get any bigger than having a team of experts that control the forces operating in the Western Pacific waterways that directly impact the world’s global economy, stability and prosperity. Providing security in a free and open Indo-Pacific for all mariners requires a team effort.

It was absolutely exhilarating to watch the teamwork as all the pieces come together this past week. JS Kirishima participated in air defense and communications exercises with strike group ships.  Her air controllers provided control for Air Wing aircraft, and along with USS Antietam and USS Milius, she supported USS Ronald Reagan with flight operations.  Additionally, a U.S. Navy SH-60S Sea Hawk from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron Twelve (HSC-12) demonstrated how seamlessly our ships and aircraft can work together when it landed and refueled on JS Kirishima.  Sharing experiences and lessons while exercising with our partners and allies is our surest way to strengthen naval power at and from the sea.

My staff and I had the opportunity to work directly with the JMSDF CCD6 staff and I witnessed first-hand how exchanging liaison officers accelerates our learning.  The exchanges included JMSDF CCD 6 liaison officers working alongside Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15 in Sea Combat onboard Ronald Reagan integrating our cruisers and destroyers.  CCD6 officers also embarked USS Antietam to increase air defense interoperability throughout the strike group.  The deep interoperability we have built over the years through exercises and bilateral training was clearly evident in CCD6 and JS Kirishima’s seamless integration into our strike group operations this past week.

This is the sixth carrier I’ve served on and it is extremely gratifying each day at sea to watch our crews operate with precision and professionalism.  Seamlessly coordinating with our allies in today’s highly technical information driven environment is even more rewarding.  Every time we work with our Japanese allies we each learn from one another, which in turn makes our alliance stronger.  I look forward to the next opportunity to host the JMSDF, or Kaijo Jieitai as they are known in Japan, onboard Ronald Reagan and to train alongside their highly professional ships and Sailors.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/08/30/sailing-side-by-side-the-jmsdf-strengthening-interoperability-with-a-key-ally/ parcher