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Category Archives: suicide prevention

Around the Air Force: Resiliency stand down / New GPS satellite

In today's look around the Air Force Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Kaleth Wright, talks about resiliency as the service announces a stand down day for all wings, and Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, completes testing of a new satellite. (Hosted by Staff Sgt. Anastasia Tompkins)

https://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1930094/around-the-air-force-resiliency-stand-down-new-gps-satellite/ Staff Sgt. Anastasia Tompkins

Misawa AB recognized by DoD for Suicide Prevention for the second year in a row

Misawa Air Base, Japan was recognized for a second year in a row as the top Air Force installation during Suicide Prevention Month. During a ceremony in the Hall of Heroes at the Pentagon, in Arlington, Virginia, May 15.
Col. Kristopher Struve, Misawa Air Base, Japan Wing commander, Command Chief Master Sgt. John C. Alsvig and Ms. Michelle Aldana accept a certificate of appreciation from Dr. Elizabeth P. Van Winkle, executive director, Office of Force Resiliency during the 2018 Defense Suicide Prevention Month recognition ceremony at the Pentagon, in Arlington, Va., May 15, 2019. Misawa AB was recognized by DoD two years in a row for suicide prevention outreach. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Anthony Nelson Jr.)

https://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1851277/misawa-ab-recognized-by-dod-for-suicide-prevention-for-the-second-year-in-a-row/ Tech. Sgt. Anthony Nelson Jr.

CNO, MCPON Answer Sailors’ Questions During Facebook Live

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith answered Sailors’ questions during a Facebook Live all-hands call on the Navy’s Facebook page Dec. 14 at the Pentagon. You can watch the full event above and highlights below.

 

WASHINGTON (Dec. 14, 2018) Public affairs personnel from the staffs of Adm. Richardson and MCPON Smith as well as the Navy’s digital media engagement team monitor questions during a Facebook Live all-hands call in the Pentagon. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Elliott Fabrizio/Released)
WASHINGTON (Dec. 14, 2018) Public affairs personnel from the staffs of Adm. Richardson and MCPON Smith as well as the Navy’s digital media engagement team monitor questions during a Facebook Live all-hands call in the Pentagon. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Elliott Fabrizio/Released)

 

Perhaps one of the most important things discussed was not being afraid to seek help with mental health. If you watch one thing online today, please make it MCPON’s Smith message in this video.

All Hands Call: Mental health

Perhaps one of the most important things that was discussed during Friday's all hands call was not being afraid to seek help with mental health. If you watch one thing online today, please make it MCPON's Smith message in this video.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

 

Sometimes, it doesn’t hurt to ask.
Thanks to a question, Adm. Richardson authorized on Friday gloves for wear with the fleece as an outer garment effectively immediately.

All Hands Call: Gloves with fleece

Sometimes, it doesn't hurt to ask during an all hands call.Thanks to a question, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson authorized on Friday gloves for wear with the fleece as an outer garment effectively immediately.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, December 15, 2018

 

During the all hands call, MCPON Smith was asked about advancement opportunities and shared insight into the Detailing Marketplace as part of Sailor 2025 Rating Modernization.

All Hands Call: Advancement opportunities

During Friday's all hands call, MCPON Smith was asked about advancement opportunities and shared insight into the Detailing Marketplace as part of Sailor 2025 Rating Modernization.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

 

Smith also discussed how tailored compensation will allow for the opportunity for bundled orders, geographic stability and other compensation.

All Hands Call: Tailored compensation

During Friday's all hands call, MCPON Smith explained how tailored compensation will allow for the opportunity for bundled orders, geographic stability and other compensation.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

Below is the link that Smith referenced in his above video response.

 

We’ve made changes to boot camp to better prepare recruits for the fleet. MCPON Smith explained those more stressful and less predictable changes.

All Hands Call: Boot camp changes

We've made changes to #USNavy boot camp to better prepare recruits for the fleet. During Friday's all hands call, Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith explained those more stressful and less predictable changes.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

 

The clock is ticking for eligible Sailors to decide whether to opt in to the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD)’s new Blended Retirement System. MCPON Smith offered some advice.

All Hands Call: Blended Retirement System

The clock is ticking for eligible Sailors to decide whether to opt in to the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD)'s new Blended Retirement System. Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith offered some advice during Friday’s all hands call.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

 

During the all hands call, Adm. Richardson addressed the possibility of a government shutdown.

All Hands Call: Possibility of government shutdown

During Friday’s all hands call, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson addressed the possibility of a government shutdown.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, December 15, 2018

 

Richardson also answered a question about whether future deployments could be similar to USS Harry S. Truman’s highly unpredictable deployment, which reflected Dynamic Force Employment.

All Hands Call: Dynamic Force Employment

In case you missed Friday's all hands call, we've got you covered.Listen as Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson answered a question about whether future deployments could be similar to USS Harry S. Truman's highly unpredictable deployment, which reflected Dynamic Force Employment.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, December 15, 2018

 

Thanks to everyone who participated! There were a lot of good questions – too many to answer! Be sure to follow Adm. Richardson and MCPON Smith on Facebook.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/12/16/cno-mcpon-answer-sailors-questions-during-facebook-live/ Jason Kelly

Suicide Prevention Takes One Small Act to Save a Life

From U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

This week, we talked with Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet, Adm. Scott Swift and Fleet Master Chief Suz Whitman to discuss suicide prevention, the need to create a resilient workforce and eliminate barriers that prevent Sailors from seeking help.

“September is Suicide Prevention Month, but suicide prevention is a year-round mission, one in which all of us as shipmates have a role to play to eliminate suicide from our ranks and eliminate the barriers that prevent Sailors from seeking help.”
– Adm. Scott Swift
Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet

Adm. Swift:

Pacific Fleet Sailors and civilian Sailors, the first principle of my commander’s intent is for us to preserve a resilient workforce. A key to that is rejecting behaviors that place individuals at risk.

September is Suicide Prevention Month, but suicide prevention is a year-round mission, one in which all of us as shipmates have a role to play to eliminate suicide from our ranks and eliminate the barriers that prevent Sailors from seeking help.

Suicide risk reduction is tied to our general resilience efforts, such as maintaining healthy relationships, ensuring Sailors have a sense of belonging, cultivating healthy personal and professional goals, developing coping skills to more effectively manage stress, and timely intervention for persons at risk.

Examination of previous suicides has taught us that common risk factors such as relationship problems, career disruptions like legal problems or professional setbacks, and periods of transitions can all be contributors to someone making a destructive choice. In many cases, these leading indicators, or portions of them, were known by shipmates, but we were not able to connect the dots before a crisis occurred.

Toughness – the ability to resist being overcome by stress – and resilience – the ability to recover from struggles or setbacks – are part of our Navy heritage. They are essential to our mental, emotional and spiritual fitness. And just as with physical fitness, the key to being in optimal condition is through practice and preventive efforts.

Fleet Master Chief Whitman:

Chaplains, Fleet and Family Services, and embedded mental health programs can help you to develop good practices for your mental, emotional and spiritual fitness – so that when you experience difficult circumstances you will be prepared to handle them. Most importantly, if you find yourself contemplating suicide, please ask for help.

When it comes to suicide prevention, we are all leaders and we must look out for one another to recognize people at risk and have the courage to ask them if they are having thoughts of suicide or wanting to die.

Words matter. Anyone, regardless of rank may need help from time-to-time. It is important that we convey in our words and our actions that we’ll be there when you need us. Make words like “Every Sailor, Every Day”, “1 Small ACT”, and #BeThere be more than just campaign slogans, make them a part of our culture.

Adm. Swift:

If a fellow Sailor appears to be in need of help, reach out and help them. It’s what shipmates do. It only takes one small act to save a life.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/09/28/suicide-prevention-takes-one-small-act-to-save-a-life/ U.S. Navy

Suicide Prevention: Act. Care. Treat.

Our measure of success really is how well our Sailors perform at their job. Ensuring they can come to work in a healthy environment. There are policies to set them up for success.

There are a lot of reasons members decide to take their own life. So words and thoughts matter, and pay attention to them.

 

MC2 Burleson: Welcome, I’m joined today by the director of the 21st Century Sailor office, Rear Adm. Karl Thomas to discuss his role as director, his expectations for Sailors and his plans to further the 21st century sailor program during his tenure. Sir, thank you for being here.

Rear Adm. Thomas: Thanks for having me.

MC2 Burleson: Sir, you have been here for a few months now. What are your long terms goals that you hope to accomplish during your tenure?

Rear Adm. Thomas: The 21st Century Sailor Office is responsible for a wide range of personnel policy, things like sexual harassment, sexual assault, suicide prevention, alcohol and drug abuse, and physical readiness. I tell my teams that our day job is to make sure those policies are current and they are relevant. Our measure of success really is how well our Sailors perform at their job. Ensuring they can come to work in a healthy environment. There are policies to set them up for success. My long-term goal really is about ensuring that every Sailor’s behavior is in line with our Navy core values and our Navy core attributes so that teams can be stronger, teams flourish. You can develop that unit pride that makes our Navy so special.

MC2 Burleson: Sir, as you know we are approaching Suicide Prevention Month. What is your message for Sailors for caring for themselves and caring for others?

Rear Adm. Thomas: The business and the lifestyle that we lead is not easy. We ask an awful lot of our Sailors and our leaders on a daily basis. It can be stressful. It can be work related stress; personal stress; social stress; financial stress and I would ask our Sailors to look out for one another. I would ask our leaders to find ways to reduce stress in the work environment. We need to have a place, an environment where Sailors feel comfortable bringing their challenges forward. We need our Sailors to feel comfortable. If they don’t feel well to go seek help. I would ask Sailors to look out if they notice somebody is hurting, to intervene and ask. It is really all about being human. It is about treating others like you would want to be treated, and being there for every Sailor every day, and follow and act. Act, care and treat.

MC2 Burleson: Sir, what should Sailors be looking for in their interactions with others –other Sailors, other family members, maybe their friends? What should we be looking for?

Rear Adm. Thomas: Suicide usually occurs in Sailors who are under a lot of stress and experiencing a multitude of different types of stress. It can be relationship challenges; it can be problems at work, both personal or professional. It can be career transitions, disciplinary, or legal issues, financial strain. There are a lot of reasons members decide to take their own life. So words and thoughts matter, and pay attention to them. If you hear something that concerns you, act on it, and ask if the person is doing all right. There is no harm in asking someone if they have a firearm. Unfortunately, about 60 percent of our members that die by a suicide use a firearm, so asking if they have a gun, asking if it’s locked up, asking if you can hold on to it or maybe take it to an armory. Those are all viable questions that may be that break the chain that prevents a suicide.

MC2 Burleson: Earlier this year the Navy began Sailor Assistance and Intercept for Life Program, or SAIL. What can you tell us about that program and what is means for Sailors?

Rear Adm. Thomas: SAIL is a great program. SAIL is a program we took from the Marine Corps and applied to the Navy. The critical 90 days following suicide related behavior the command will approach the Sailor and ask if they would like to be involved in the SAIL program. What is does is it hooks that Sailor up with a trained counselor at the Fleet and Family Service Center, and that counselor can talk to that Sailor on a frequent basis and maybe bridge that gap between the mental health appointments. It’s not replacing the mental health services that those individuals need, but it’s that care and contact that has a chance to intervene and just check up on you. Make sure you get the treatment you need and get you through those difficult 90 days so that we can get the Sailor back into the command and get them productive and make them feel good about themselves.

MC2 Burleson: Where can Sailors get more information about suicide prevention and the 21st Century Sailor Program?

Rear Adm. Thomas: This September is obviously suicide prevention month and we a website dedicated to that. It’s www.suicide.navy.mil. There is also a host of resources about the 21st Century Sailor Office on the NPC website. It will be coming to My Navy Portal in the near future. Visit those sites; ask questions. If you have concerns talk to your leadership. We want you to have a very safe September and the rest of the year. This is an opportunity for us to reenergize our knowledge about suicide awareness and take those small acts every day, and make sure that your shipmates are looking out for each other.

MC2 Burleson: Sir, thank you for being here and answering all the questions.

Rear Adm. Thomas: Thanks for having me.

MC2 Burleson: Thank you all for watching.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/08/28/suicide-prevention-act-care-treat/ U.S. Navy

Suicide Prevention: Strengthening our Navy Team Together

By Rear Adm. Ann Burkhardt
Director, 21st Century Sailor Office

Suicide is a tragedy that extends beyond individual Sailors. It affects divisions, commands and the entire Navy family. Each loss is one too many. While much work has been done to understand the underlying causes of suicide, it is a complex issue that confronts our society as a whole, not just those of us in uniform.

ARABIAN GULF (Aug. 26, 2016) Sailors on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) participate in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk to increase awareness for suicide prevention. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard)
ARABIAN GULF (Aug. 26, 2016) Sailors on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) participate in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk to increase awareness for suicide prevention. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard)

Over the past few years we have worked hard to strengthen our prevention and intervention strategies. In September 2015, we launched “1 Small ACT,” which is focused on people connecting with people. It advocates the importance of small acts of caring – getting to know each other and showing Sailors that you care. Additionally, this past fall we announced the creation of a new suicide prevention program known as Sailor Assistance and Intercept for Life (SAIL), which is aimed at supplementing existing mental health treatment by providing continual support through the first 90 days after suicide-related behavior.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 30, 2016) Lt. Luke Dundon, assistant command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Weapons Department Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeanette Mullinax/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 30, 2016) Lt. Luke Dundon, assistant command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Weapons Department Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jeanette Mullinax/Released)

However, anyone can be at risk for suicide as we face life’s challenges, even the toughest among us. And while Sailors pride themselves on their mental, physical and spiritual toughness, as they should, all of us go through challenges that can be difficult to talk about.

That’s why it’s imperative that we as Sailors, as individuals and as friends, look out for each other, recognize that something may not be right and then step in.

Right now, in your division, your department or your command, there is someone that may need your help, who is struggling with stress or having thoughts of suicide.

It’s important to recognize that suicides typically occur when Sailors are experiencing some combination of recent multiple stressors, including relationship problems, personal or professional loss, recent career transitions, disciplinary / legal issues and financial strain. We cannot ignore the harmful effects of poor self-care, prolonged stress and chronic sleep deprivation that can be catalysts for or results of such challenges.

Talking about our challenges, whether they’re operational, social or psychological in nature, makes us all better as a team and helps us create a climate of trust, which encourages Sailors to come forward and seek help in times of need.

This issue doesn’t end with one conversation, a momentary action or a change of policy. And it cannot be something we only think about one month out of the year. It’s a daily effort 24/7/365.  Be there for every Sailor, every day.

PHILIPPINE SEA (Aug. 26, 2016) Cmdr. Curtis Price, command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)
PHILIPPINE SEA (Aug. 26, 2016) Cmdr. Curtis Price, command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

Furthermore, it’s the responsibility of Navy leaders to set a tone within our commands where Sailors have the courage to ask for help and when they do, they get the right resources and support they need. This requires that we all have awareness of the services provided by your local and embedded mental healthcare providers, Fleet and Family Support Centers, Military OneSource and the absolute confidentiality of our Navy Chaplain Corps.

Talk to your shipmates. Ask them how they’re doing. Open the dialogue. It’s our duty to strengthen our Navy team, today and into the future, one Sailor at a time.

Assistance is always available. Call the Military Crisis Line at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), www.militarycrisisline.net or text 838255 for free confidential support 24 / 7.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/11/29/suicide-prevention-strengthening-our-navy-team-together/ U.S. Navy

Suicide Prevention: Strengthening our Navy Team Together

By Rear Adm. Ann Burkhardt
Director, 21st Century Sailor Office

Suicide is a tragedy that extends beyond individual Sailors. It affects divisions, commands and the entire Navy family. Each loss is one too many. While much work has been done to understand the underlying causes of suicide, it is a complex issue that confronts our society as a whole, not just those of us in uniform.

ARABIAN GULF (Aug. 26, 2016) Sailors on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) participate in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk to increase awareness for suicide prevention. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard)
ARABIAN GULF (Aug. 26, 2016) Sailors on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) participate in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk to increase awareness for suicide prevention. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard)

Over the past few years we have worked hard to strengthen our prevention and intervention strategies. In September 2015, we launched “1 Small ACT,” which is focused on people connecting with people. It advocates the importance of small acts of caring – getting to know each other and showing Sailors that you care. Additionally, this past fall we announced the creation of a new suicide prevention program known as Sailor Assistance and Intercept for Life (SAIL), which is aimed at supplementing existing mental health treatment by providing continual support through the first 90 days after suicide-related behavior.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 30, 2016) Lt. Luke Dundon, assistant command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Weapons Department Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeanette Mullinax/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 30, 2016) Lt. Luke Dundon, assistant command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Weapons Department Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jeanette Mullinax/Released)

However, anyone can be at risk for suicide as we face life’s challenges, even the toughest among us. And while Sailors pride themselves on their mental, physical and spiritual toughness, as they should, all of us go through challenges that can be difficult to talk about.

That’s why it’s imperative that we as Sailors, as individuals and as friends, look out for each other, recognize that something may not be right and then step in.

Right now, in your division, your department or your command, there is someone that may need your help, who is struggling with stress or having thoughts of suicide.

It’s important to recognize that suicides typically occur when Sailors are experiencing some combination of recent multiple stressors, including relationship problems, personal or professional loss, recent career transitions, disciplinary / legal issues and financial strain. We cannot ignore the harmful effects of poor self-care, prolonged stress and chronic sleep deprivation that can be catalysts for or results of such challenges.

Talking about our challenges, whether they’re operational, social or psychological in nature, makes us all better as a team and helps us create a climate of trust, which encourages Sailors to come forward and seek help in times of need.

This issue doesn’t end with one conversation, a momentary action or a change of policy. And it cannot be something we only think about one month out of the year. It’s a daily effort 24/7/365.  Be there for every Sailor, every day.

PHILIPPINE SEA (Aug. 26, 2016) Cmdr. Curtis Price, command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)
PHILIPPINE SEA (Aug. 26, 2016) Cmdr. Curtis Price, command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

Furthermore, it’s the responsibility of Navy leaders to set a tone within our commands where Sailors have the courage to ask for help and when they do, they get the right resources and support they need. This requires that we all have awareness of the services provided by your local and embedded mental healthcare providers, Fleet and Family Support Centers, Military OneSource and the absolute confidentiality of our Navy Chaplain Corps.

Talk to your shipmates. Ask them how they’re doing. Open the dialogue. It’s our duty to strengthen our Navy team, today and into the future, one Sailor at a time.

Assistance is always available. Call the Military Crisis Line at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), www.militarycrisisline.net or text 838255 for free confidential support 24 / 7.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/11/29/suicide-prevention-strengthening-our-navy-team-together/ U.S. Navy