Category: Adm. John Richardson

Becoming One Navy Team

On the 71st anniversary of President Harry S. Truman’s signing of the Executive Orders 9980 and 9981, mandating equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services and federal government regardless of race, color, religion or national origin, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson addresses the essential role diversity plays in helping the U.S. Navy remain the world’s most decisive and lethal naval force:

Team, today marks a historic day for our Navy and our military.

71 years ago, on this day in 1948, President Truman signed Executive Orders 9980 and 9981, stating for the first time that there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services and federal government regardless of race, color, religion or national origin.

John Henry Turpin

71 years ago, we took a crucial step in building the strength of our Navy team. We honored, recognized, and codified the contributions of our people of color who fought for our Independence, who fought to keep our union together, who went ashore on D-Day, who fought across the Pacific with us.

Famous units like the Buffalo Soldiers, the Navajo Wind Talkers, the Army’s 442nd Regimental Combat team, and the Tuskegee Airmen. Famous people like Chief Gunner’s Mate John Henry Turpin, David Farragut, hero of the Civil War, and the Navy’s first admiral, Native American Ernest Evans, and the millions of others who served.

David Glasgow Farragut

71 years ago, we decided that what bound us together were our values as Americans. What mattered was a person’s honor, courage, and commitment to serve our nation — not the color of our skins.

Today, the Navy works hard every day to become that service. That place where you belong, if you believe what America stands for and want to defend it by living a life of integrity, accountability, initiative, and toughness. By serving something bigger than ourselves.

Ernest E. Evans

Today, we are stronger because we respect each other’s different ways to contribute to the mission, and never forget what connects and unites us.

Today, we continue to recognize the dignity and contribution of all in our Navy Team. We are ready to put our lives in each other’s’ hands.

By getting the best of us all — together — the U.S. Navy will remain the world’s most decisive and lethal naval force.

Let’s get to it.

Travels with CNO: Richardson completes 10 day around-the-world trip

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson recently completed a 10 day around-the-world trip where he met with our forward deployed forces, partners and allies, and those who meet us on the seas.

Below is a recap of his trip as shared through social media.

January 14

Team, I’m grateful for the hospitality and professional reception that I have received from our hosts in the People's…

Posted by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson on Monday, January 14, 2019

 

January 15:
Team, I continue to have a productive visit to China where I met with my Chinese counterpart, VADM Shen Jinlong, and senior Chinese defense officials. Our two nations both benefit from a maritime that is secure, orderly and conforms to international law.

CNO Visits China

Team, I continue to have a productive visit to China where I met with my Chinese counterpart, VADM Shen Jinlong, and senior Chinese defense officials. Our two nations both benefit from a maritime that is secure, orderly and conforms to international law.

Posted by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson on Tuesday, January 15, 2019

 

January 16:
Team, I very much appreciate the hospitality I received in China. I had some great discussion with my counterparts and I look forward to strengthening our relationship as we move forward. A free and open Indo-Pacific is in everyone’s best interest.

Team, I very much appreciate the hospitality I received in China. I had some great discussion with my counterparts and I look forward to strengthening our relationship as we move forward. A free and open Indo-Pacific is in everyone’s best interest.

Posted by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson on Wednesday, January 16, 2019

 

January 17:
Team, a great start to our day, having breakfast with forward-deployed Sailors here in the Yokosuka galley (United States Fleet Activities Yokosuka). I’m incredibly proud of the important work our Sailors do in U.S. 7th Fleet!

CNO has Breakfast with Sailors in Japan

Team, a great start to our day, having breakfast with forward-deployed Sailors here in the Yokosuka galley (United States Fleet Activities Yokosuka). I’m incredibly proud of the important work our Sailors do in U.S. 7th Fleet!

Posted by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson on Thursday, January 17, 2019

 

January 19:
Team, I completed a great series of engagements with our Japanese allies, including Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and my JMSDF counterpart. Every time I have the pleasure of visiting Japan, we arrive with a very very strong relationship and we depart with an even stronger relationship.

CNO Visits Japan

Team, I completed a great series of engagements with our Japanese allies, including Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and my JMSDF counterpart. Every time I have the pleasure of visiting Japan, we arrive with a very very strong relationship and we depart with an even stronger relationship.

Posted by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson on Friday, January 18, 2019

 

January 19:
Team, I’m very proud of our Sailors and Marines aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) deployed out here in the Arabian Gulf. They’re about midway through their deployment and are working incredibly hard to protect America from attack and promote our interests around the world. 

CNO Visits Sailors Aboard Stennis

Team, I'm very proud of our Sailors and Marines aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) deployed out here in the Arabian Gulf. They're about midway through their deployment and are working incredibly hard to protect America from attack and promote our interests around the world. #LookAhead

Posted by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson on Saturday, January 19, 2019

 

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson came to visit the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) out to sea to engage with…

Posted by USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) on Saturday, January 19, 2019

 

January 21

Team, MCPON and I were proud to spend time with the Sailors aboard USS ROSS (DDG 71) here in Naval Station Rota, Spain….

Posted by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson on Sunday, January 20, 2019

 

January 22:
Team, I recently spent time with the crew of USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) and Carrier Air Wing Nine during their deployment in U.S. Naval Forces Central Command / U.S. 5th Fleet. I’m very proud of the tremendous work the team is doing to protect America from attack as they test new concepts for our U.S. Navy: Dynamic Force Employment.

CNO Visits USS John C. Stennis

Team, I recently spent time with the crew of USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) and Carrier Air Wing NINE during their deployment in U.S. Naval Forces Central Command / U.S. 5th Fleet. I'm very proud of the tremendous work the team is doing to protect America from attack as they test new concepts for our @U.S. Navy: Dynamic Force Employment.

Posted by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson on Tuesday, January 22, 2019

 

CNO, MCPON Answer Sailors’ Questions During Facebook Live

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith answered Sailors’ questions during a Facebook Live all-hands call on the Navy’s Facebook page Dec. 14 at the Pentagon. You can watch the full event above and highlights below.

 

WASHINGTON (Dec. 14, 2018) Public affairs personnel from the staffs of Adm. Richardson and MCPON Smith as well as the Navy’s digital media engagement team monitor questions during a Facebook Live all-hands call in the Pentagon. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Elliott Fabrizio/Released)
WASHINGTON (Dec. 14, 2018) Public affairs personnel from the staffs of Adm. Richardson and MCPON Smith as well as the Navy’s digital media engagement team monitor questions during a Facebook Live all-hands call in the Pentagon. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Elliott Fabrizio/Released)

 

Perhaps one of the most important things discussed was not being afraid to seek help with mental health. If you watch one thing online today, please make it MCPON’s Smith message in this video.

All Hands Call: Mental health

Perhaps one of the most important things that was discussed during Friday's all hands call was not being afraid to seek help with mental health. If you watch one thing online today, please make it MCPON's Smith message in this video.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

 

Sometimes, it doesn’t hurt to ask.
Thanks to a question, Adm. Richardson authorized on Friday gloves for wear with the fleece as an outer garment effectively immediately.

All Hands Call: Gloves with fleece

Sometimes, it doesn't hurt to ask during an all hands call.Thanks to a question, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson authorized on Friday gloves for wear with the fleece as an outer garment effectively immediately.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, December 15, 2018

 

During the all hands call, MCPON Smith was asked about advancement opportunities and shared insight into the Detailing Marketplace as part of Sailor 2025 Rating Modernization.

All Hands Call: Advancement opportunities

During Friday's all hands call, MCPON Smith was asked about advancement opportunities and shared insight into the Detailing Marketplace as part of Sailor 2025 Rating Modernization.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

 

Smith also discussed how tailored compensation will allow for the opportunity for bundled orders, geographic stability and other compensation.

All Hands Call: Tailored compensation

During Friday's all hands call, MCPON Smith explained how tailored compensation will allow for the opportunity for bundled orders, geographic stability and other compensation.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

Below is the link that Smith referenced in his above video response.

 

We’ve made changes to boot camp to better prepare recruits for the fleet. MCPON Smith explained those more stressful and less predictable changes.

All Hands Call: Boot camp changes

We've made changes to #USNavy boot camp to better prepare recruits for the fleet. During Friday's all hands call, Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith explained those more stressful and less predictable changes.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

 

The clock is ticking for eligible Sailors to decide whether to opt in to the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD)’s new Blended Retirement System. MCPON Smith offered some advice.

All Hands Call: Blended Retirement System

The clock is ticking for eligible Sailors to decide whether to opt in to the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD)'s new Blended Retirement System. Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith offered some advice during Friday’s all hands call.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, December 16, 2018

 

During the all hands call, Adm. Richardson addressed the possibility of a government shutdown.

All Hands Call: Possibility of government shutdown

During Friday’s all hands call, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson addressed the possibility of a government shutdown.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, December 15, 2018

 

Richardson also answered a question about whether future deployments could be similar to USS Harry S. Truman’s highly unpredictable deployment, which reflected Dynamic Force Employment.

All Hands Call: Dynamic Force Employment

In case you missed Friday's all hands call, we've got you covered.Listen as Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson answered a question about whether future deployments could be similar to USS Harry S. Truman's highly unpredictable deployment, which reflected Dynamic Force Employment.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, December 15, 2018

 

Thanks to everyone who participated! There were a lot of good questions – too many to answer! Be sure to follow Adm. Richardson and MCPON Smith on Facebook.

CNO Adm. Richardson’s 4th of July Message

Team,

242 years ago today, our Founders came together and ratified the Declaration of Independence. On that day, the great democratic experiment that is the United States began.

On this day, it is a worthy thing to review some of the words that launched our great nation. On this day, we should take some time to think about what those words say, what the United States means.

On this day, we still take inspiration from the words of that day:

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

“We, therefore, the Representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these united Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States…”

“And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor.”

Thanks to all of you, especially those deployed forward today, who are giving so freely of your lives, fortunes, and sacred honor to protect this fragile thing: freedom.

J. M. Richardson, ADM, USN
Chief of Naval Operations

Editor’s note: This blog was originally published July 4, 2018, on Adm. Richardson’s Facebook page.

Navy Family Framework Released

Hello team, CNO Richardson here with my wife Dana. You know Thanksgiving has always been a great family holiday and that’s why we chose this time to roll out the Navy Family Framework.

Since the very beginning of the Navy, for our entire 242 years, families have always been an essential part to naval power.

Since the very beginning of the Navy, for our entire 242 years, families have always been an essential part to naval power.

Mrs. Richardson: And our personal story in the Navy, we’ve been in for 35 years. We’ve had 21 moves, five kids, they’ve been to dozens of schools, but that’s our identity and that’s what we’re proud of. The kids are proud of my husband’s service and we’re very thankful to you and your families for your service.

CNO: And so what we did is we talked to hundreds of Sailors and hundreds of families around the Fleet and from those conversations tried to capture those very best practices. Where is it working in our Navy the very best?

Where are our families contributing the most? Where is the Navy team best supporting the families? We roll all of those best practices up and we put them in the Navy Family Framework. And so there are a number of specific goals that the framework lays out.

SAN DIEGO (Aug. 28, 2017) Operations Specialist 1st Class Charles Hammond, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104), hugs his daughter upon arriving home. Sterett concluded a five-month deployment to the Indo-Asia-Pacific region under the command of U.S. 3rd Fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Logan C. Kellums/Released)
SAN DIEGO (Aug. 28, 2017) Operations Specialist 1st Class Charles Hammond, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104), hugs his daughter upon arriving home. Sterett concluded a five-month deployment to the Indo-Asia-Pacific region under the command of U.S. 3rd Fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Logan C. Kellums/Released)

Mrs. Richardson: So the goals that we’re talking about are:

  • Improving family readiness
  • Making the spouse training opportunities available to everybody and easy to access
  • Get families the information that they need
  • Make sure we connect those commands to the families.

And in doing those things we will make our families stronger.

CNO: And a stronger family means a stronger fleet okay? We do, as Dana said, have so much to be thankful for – we all do together – thankful to be in our Navy, thankful to have the strong families that we have.

We also recognize that on this holiday like all holidays there are some families that will not be together. Their Sailors are deployed around the world protecting our freedom, protecting our ability to come together in peace. And so we especially want to be thankful for that sacrifice during the holidays.

So let’s get to it.

CNO to Fleet: Be Ready to Earn Title of Best Navy in World

CNO Richardson here and as I talk to you right now we have; the United States Navy has over 100 ships forward deployed, that includes three carrier strike groups with their air wing, two amphibious ready groups, and over 16 attack and SSBN submarines. We’ve got SEAL teams and SEALs deployed fighting Isis and counterterrorism across Africa in the Middle East.

This is a global Navy. This is the best Navy in the world – the United States Navy – but I’ll tell you what, the competition is on. There are a lot of navies out there vying for the title of best in the world and we need to come to work every day ready to earn that title of best navy in the world. How can you do that?

There are a lot of navies out there vying for the title of best in the world and we need to come to work every day ready to earn that title of best navy in the world.
As individual Sailors, we’ve got to know how to fight our ships. We have to know how to run our watch stations for normal, combat and casualty conditions. As team leaders and especially as commanders we need to run our teams through their paces. We need to do the proper planning – planning for the best case, planning for the worst case. We need to do the practice to that plan so that we do the sets and reps as a team and then we need to execute to that plan. By planning, practicing and executing, we’ll make sure our teams are ready.

Finally, as your CNO I need to back you up 100 percent and I will. I will make sure that you get the resources you need and I want to crush every obstacle that stands between you and being the best Sailor that you can be. Let me know what I can do to enable you to do that.

I will make sure that you get the resources you need and I want to crush every obstacle that stands between you and being the best Sailor that you can be.

I’m here on the USS Gridley (DDG 101) in Everett, Washington. It was Capt. Gridley who got the order from Adm. Dewey to fire when ready. We need to be ready to execute that order. We need to be ready to fire on command. That’s the way we’re going to stay the best navy in the world. Let’s get to it.

CNO Briefs Collisions and Comprehensive Review of Surface Force Incidents

Today (Nov. 2) at 1 p.m. EDT, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson is scheduled to hold a briefing on the USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) and USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) collisions, as well as the Comprehensive Review of Surface Force Incidents

The review was conducted by Adm. Phil Davidson, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command.

On Nov. 1, the Navy released a report detailing the events and actions that led to the collision of USS Fitzgerald and ACX Crystal off the coast of Japan June 17, and the collision of USS John S. McCain and merchant vessel Alnic MC Aug. 21.

In a memorandum dated Aug. 24, 2017, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. William Moran detailed Davidson’s responsibilities as the head of the chief of naval operations directed comprehensive review.

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Richardson: See toxic behavior? Intervene, stop, report

The following message was released fleetwide by Chief of Naval Operations Admiral John Richardson as NAVADMIN 066/17 on March, 21, 2017.

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson visits Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD), Jan. 18.
U.S. Navy file photo/Released

The United States Navy is a high-performing combat team that strives to be its best, in both competence and character, every day. We push ourselves and our shipmates to perform at the highest levels of operational and warfighting proficiency, and we demonstrate our Core Values of Honor, Courage and Commitment in everything we do. This applies on and off duty, and applies in our physical lives and our virtual lives.

Bullying, hazing, harassment, stalking, discrimination, retaliation, assault and other types of toxic behavior, online or anywhere else, undermine teamwork and make us less capable – they give advantage to our enemies. In some cases they are also criminal. How we treat each other online is as important as how we relate to one another in person. The internet, with any sense of anonymity it may provide, must not be a haven for bad behavior. Your online life is still your life.

I’m sure you’ve seen the same thing I have: the very best teams perform best across the board. They have no place for toxic behavior that weakens the team – they are laser-focused on continually improving their performance. The best teams act to discourage and prevent toxic behaviors before they happen, recognizing their weakening effect. Let’s be the best. Encourage each other to avoid toxic behaviors in all forms and focus on team effectiveness.

If you see these behaviors anywhere, step in – there are no bystanders on our team. Intervene and stop the behavior. If necessary, promptly report toxic behaviors to your chain of command. You can also report to Family Support Services, Command Managed Equal Opportunity (CMEO) managers, Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) administrators, Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention personnel, the Inspector General (IG), and NCIS, as applicable. NCIS has encouraged anyone with direct knowledge of online misconduct related to the recent reporting or who thinks that photos of them have been taken or posted without their consent to contact them via text, web or smart phone app. Specific instructions are available at http://www.ncis.navy.mil/contactus/pages/reportacrime.aspx. The Navy Office of Information (CHINFO) has training references on appropriate behavior online that can be found at http://www.navy.mil/socialmedia.

We are at our best when we intervene and prevent bad behaviors before they happen. This is the sign of a high-performing team. Be your best. Be expert operators and warfighters. Be people of integrity, accountability, initiative and toughness. In everything you do, live a life of Honor, Courage, and Commitment.

No Bystanders

The following message was sent by Chief of Naval Operations Admiral John Richardson to all commanders fleetwide.

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson visits Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD), Jan. 18.
U.S. Navy file photo/Released

Team, we have a problem and we need to solve it. Really solve it – not put a band-aid on it, not whitewash over it, not look the other way.

The discovery of on-line sites that degrade the female members of our team has shined a light on the fact that this problem persists.  But we get reminders of it every day, when we disrespect women by crude jokes, wisecracks, sexual harassment, and in its worst manifestation, sexual assault – a serious violent crime. Despite a steady effort to get after this, we’re not making progress.

This demeaning activity offends so many of us because fundamentally, this is not how we treat true teammates. This is not how we treat fellow Sailors. We operate, and will fight, in our teams. We will depend on each other to protect and save our lives, to win.

In teams, there are no bystanders. We are all in, every one of us. We have high expectations of each other, hold each other accountable, and we treat each other with respect. We build our teammates up to make them stronger. We definitely don’t allow anybody to disrespect another teammate – we close ranks and protect.

I’ve heard hundreds of times that “these actions are being taken by only a small minority.” Prove that. If that’s true, then the vast majority of men and women need to stand up and smother this behavior. To become intolerant. To act to put a stop to this. And if you’re one of that minority that just won’t get it, then it’s time for you to leave the Navy.
As a commander, your entire team counts on you leading a winning team, that INCLUDES a culture of dignity and respect, consistent with our core values and attributes. Without this trust, we will fail.

I expect COs and each level of leadership to challenge your command leaders at the small team level. Division Officers and Chiefs talking to their divisions, branches talking to branches, Chief’s Mess to Chief’s Mess. Talk about what respect for our teammates looks like at work, at home, and online. Make it clear that individuals who can’t live up to our professional standards in competence and character are not welcome in our Navy. Make it clear that our standards call us to a higher commitment than the law  we are better than that. And finally, I expect you to make it crystal clear that to remain the world’s most powerful Navy we must be 100% focused on staying ahead of our competition, which starts with leadership and teamwork, built on trust and respect. This is a challenge to all Navy leaders – particularly junior leaders. Own this problem. Solve it.

There is no room in our Navy for toxic behavior. It makes us weaker, and cedes advantage to the enemy. Direct involvement of commanders and small unit leaders will help us stamp this out. We are a team. We are Sailors.  We are the United States Navy. I’m counting on you. Let’s get to it.

Admiral Richardson sends.//