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Category Archives: USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)

Remembering the Battle of Midway

By Rear Adm. Roy Kelley

Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

If time travel were possible, it would be interesting to go back and watch the Battle of Midway unfold. Sitting in the radio room, I could listen to pilots give updates on the position of the Japanese fleet. Then I would make my way to the flight deck and stand in awe watching Navy Avengers and Wildcats launch and recover. How amazing it would be to see and hear firsthand the actions of brave Sailors who literally reshaped history and the world as we know it today.

As a member of the Naval Air Force Atlantic team, the Battle of Midway is especially close to my heart because of the incredible impact it had on the Navy, Naval aviation and the evolution of how we conduct war from the sea.

Battle of Midway, June 1942. Torpedo Squadron Six (VT-6) TBD-1 aircraft are prepared for launching on USS Enterprise (CV-6) at about 0730-0740 , June 4, 1942.Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

From 1942 to 2019, over the course of 77 years, many aspects of naval warfare have evolvedbut some things remain resolute. During World War II, the aircraft carrier and its embarked air wing replaced the battleship as the most powerful naval offensive weapons system; that tide has not shifted.

It is amazing to see aircraft carriers are just as strategically vital to our nation’s defense now as then. While the concept of launching and recovering aircraft at sea has remained the same, the capability and lethality of our flattops has changed enormously.

The carriers at Midway were 820 feet long and dependent on oilers for fuel. Modern carriers are nearly 1,100 feet long and run on nuclear power. They can remain at sea for 25 years before needing to refuel.

As for our aircraft, the evolution is striking. Modern jets and helicopters have an increased lethality and can conduct a much wider range of missions, to include anti-submarine warfare, intelligence gathering, search and rescue, precision strike, offensive and defensive counter-air and many others.

One area where you would find little difference, however, is the quality of our men and women serving in uniform. From the Revolutionary War through the Battle of Midway to our ships deployed around the world today, our Sailors transcend time, passing pride, patriotism and professionalism from one generation to the next.

Those serving today are a direct reflection of the Sailors that stood on the bridge, worked on the flight decks and sat in the cockpit of aircraft taking off from USS Yorktown, USS Enterprise and USS Hornet in June 1942. I have no doubt that just like their predecessors, these dedicated and extremely bright men and women will lead the next “greatest generation.”

In 1942, our Navy was the only thing standing between freedom and tyranny. And ironically, today we are facing similar global threats around the world.

 

GULF OF ALASKA (May 25, 2019) The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) transits the Gulf of Alaska. Theodore Roosevelt is conducting routine operations in the Eastern Pacific. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Erick A. Parsons/Released)

Our fleet of 11 aircraft carriers have traveled millions of miles across the world’s oceans to fight our adversaries, deter aggression and ensure international waters remain free. Our current adversaries may be flying a different flag than those in 1942, but their intent to restrict access and intimidate other nations on the high seas is something we have seen before.

The aircraft carrier proved its worth at Midway. And today and for decades to come, our Nimitz- and Ford-class carriers will remain the backbone of the fleet.

Three U.S. Navy aircraft carriers at Midway turned the tide of the war in the Pacific. Today, at this moment, we have four carriers at sea: Lincoln, Reagan, Truman and Eisenhower. Each is manned by our nation’s best, prepared to take the fight to our enemies and ensure tyranny remains far from our shores.

For those who served at the Battle of Midway, we thank you for stepping forward to defend our great nation. For those who gave their lives during this historic engagement, your sacrifice was not in vain and will forever be rememberedespecially by your shipmates in Naval aviation.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/06/07/remembering-the-battle-of-midway/ jbell

U.S. Navy Carriers Keep Freedom Safe

This week, Nimitz-class aircraft carriers USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) have been conducting operations around the globe, demonstrating the inherent capacity of the aircraft carrier and embarked Carrier Air Wing.

U.S. Navy aircraft carriers maintain unmatched responsiveness, flexibility, and mobility as well as the unique ability to operate forward, far away from American shores, unconstrained by the need to refuel. The nuclear-powered ship provides extra capacity for aircraft fuel, armament, and additional warfighting capability — a growth margin for future technology in shipboard warfighting systems and advanced aircraft. This asymmetric advantage grants us access to maritime domains that no other country can influence across the full range of military options. Check more details below:

Article: USS John C. Stennis Arrives in Norfolk (May 16, 2019)

Blog: John C. Stennis Joins the Norfolk CVN Family (May 15, 2019)

In the fall of 2018, quietly and with a purpose, USS John C. Stennis departed Bremerton, Washington, with little notice and less fanfare… Not an easy task for 100,000 tons of steel. —  Rear Adm. Roy Kelley

NORFOLK (May 16, 2019) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) arrives at Naval Station Norfolk, May 16, 2019. John C. Stennis arrived in its new homeport at Naval Station Norfolk, following a deployment to the U.S. 2nd, 3rd, 5th, 6th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility and having conducted a homeport shift from Bremerton, Washington. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Kody A. Phillips/Released)

 

Article: USS Theodore Roosevelt Participates in Exercise Northern Edge 2019 (May 14, 2019)

Article: Exercise Northern Edge 2019 kicks off in Alaska (May 13, 2019)

GULF OF ALASKA (May 14, 2019) An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the “Blue Diamonds” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 146 launches from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) while participating in Exercise Northern Edge 2019. Northern Edge is one in a series of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command exercises in 2019 that prepares joint forces to respond to crisis in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Olympia O. McCoy/Released)

 

Article: Abraham Lincoln Transits Suez Canal (May 9, 2019)

Video: USS Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Completes Southbound Suez Transit (May 9, 2019)

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) and carrier strike group completes a southbound Suez Canal transit.

Video: Flight Operations Aboard USS Abraham Lincoln in the Mediterranean Sea (April 25, 2019)

U.S. Navy F/A-18 Super Hornets launch and recover aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is currently deployed in defense of American forces and interests in the 5th and 6th fleet areas of operation.

 

 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/05/17/u-s-navy-carriers-keep-freedom-safe/ U.S. Navy

Faces Of The Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing mission. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

 

ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 20, 2017) Sailors and midshipmen hold the phone and distance line on the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) during a replenishment-at-sea with the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Leroy Grumman (T-AO 195). Iwo Jima is underway with Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) FOUR and the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) conducting PHIBRON-MEU Integrated Training in preparation for their upcoming deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Dary M. Patten/Released)
NORFOLK (July 22, 2017) Sailors talk before the aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN 78) commissioning ceremony at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. Ford is the lead ship of the Ford-class aircraft carriers, and the first new U.S. aircraft carrier design in 40 years. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anna-Liesa Hussey/Released)

 

CORAL SEA (July 20, 2017) Master Chief Quartermaster James Fox, from Moyock, N.C., explains the concept of celestial navigation to Royal Australian Navy Sailors from the amphibious assault ship HMAS Canberra (L02) on vulture’s row aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), as part of a crew exchange ship tour during Talisman Saber 17. While aboard, the Australian Sailors had the opportunity to learn about U.S. amphibious operations at sea, building on long-standing alliances between the two Navies. Talisman Saber is a biennial U.S.-Australian bilateral exercise held off the coast of Australia meant to achieve interoperability and strengthen the U.S.-Australian alliance. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Cameron McCulloch/Released)
CORAL SEA (July 20, 2017) Master Chief Quartermaster James Fox, from Moyock, N.C., explains the concept of celestial navigation to Royal Australian Navy Sailors from the amphibious assault ship HMAS Canberra (L02) on vulture’s row aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), as part of a crew exchange ship tour during Talisman Saber 17. While aboard, the Australian Sailors had the opportunity to learn about U.S. amphibious operations at sea, building on long-standing alliances between the two Navies. Talisman Saber is a biennial U.S.-Australian bilateral exercise held off the coast of Australia meant to achieve interoperability and strengthen the U.S.-Australian alliance. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Cameron McCulloch/Released)

 

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (July 21, 2017) Sailors watch as aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) pulls away from the pier of Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) and gets underway. Truman sets sail down the Elizabeth River, departing NNSY following a 10-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA), to begin sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Rebekah Watkins/Released)
PORTSMOUTH, Va. (July 21, 2017) Sailors watch as aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) pulls away from the pier of Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) and gets underway. Truman sets sail down the Elizabeth River, departing NNSY following a 10-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA), to begin sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Rebekah Watkins/Released)

 

NORFOLK (JULY 25, 2017) Sailors assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), prepare to handle mooring lines from the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), as Harry S. Truman pulls into Naval Station Norfolk after completing Sea Trials. Abraham Lincoln is moored in Norfolk for a carrier incremental availability in preparation for workups. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jessica Paulauskas/Released)
NORFOLK (JULY 25, 2017) Sailors assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), prepare to handle mooring lines from the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), as Harry S. Truman pulls into Naval Station Norfolk after completing Sea Trials. Abraham Lincoln is moored in Norfolk for a carrier incremental availability in preparation for workups. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jessica Paulauskas/Released)

 

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (July 21, 2017) Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class Lindsey Smack communicates over a sound powered telephone on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) as the ship transits out to sea. Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk Naval Shipyard following a 10-month planned incremental availability, to begin sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Mason Gillan/Released)
PORTSMOUTH, Va. (July 21, 2017) Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class Lindsey Smack communicates over a sound powered telephone on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) as the ship transits out to sea. Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk Naval Shipyard following a 10-month planned incremental availability, to begin sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Mason Gillan/Released)

 

HAGATNA, Guam (July 21, 2017) Sailors assigned to the submarine tender USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) march in Guam’s 73rd Liberation Day Parade in Hagatna, Guam. Liberation Day is celebrated annually to commemorate the actions of U.S. military troops during the liberation of Guam and the battle for the Northern Marianas, which took place in 1944. emory S. Land, homeported in Guam, provides maintenance, hotel services and logistical support to submarines and surface ships in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet areas of operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Oliver Cole/Released)
HAGATNA, Guam (July 21, 2017) Sailors assigned to the submarine tender USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) march in Guam’s 73rd Liberation Day Parade in Hagatna, Guam. Liberation Day is celebrated annually to commemorate the actions of U.S. military troops during the liberation of Guam and the battle for the Northern Marianas, which took place in 1944. Emory S. Land, homeported in Guam, provides maintenance, hotel services and logistical support to submarines and surface ships in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet areas of operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Oliver Cole/Released)

 

NORFOLK (July 22, 2017) Sailors talk before the aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN 78) commissioning ceremony at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. Ford is the lead ship of the Ford-class aircraft carriers, and the first new U.S. aircraft carrier design in 40 years. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anna-Liesa Hussey/Released)
NORFOLK (July 22, 2017) Sailors talk before the aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN 78) commissioning ceremony at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. Ford is the lead ship of the Ford-class aircraft carriers, and the first new U.S. aircraft carrier design in 40 years. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anna-Liesa Hussey/Released)

 

Tell us what is your favorite photo and why?

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/07/27/faces-of-the-fleet-252/ jjohndro

USS Abraham Lincoln Return Brings CVN Fleet One Step Closer to Meeting “The Future Navy”

By Rear Adm. Bruce H. Lindsey
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

Just the other week, I had the great honor and privilege to be the keynote speaker for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)’s change of command ceremony. Just days after completing her sea trials following a four year long refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH), it was a wonderful opportunity to stand among some of the world’s greatest Sailors aboard one of the world’s greatest warships – the Navy’s most modernized and capable Nimitz-class aircraft carrier.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (May 11, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) conducts high-speed turn drills in the Atlantic Ocean during sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3nd Class Juan A. Cubano/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (May 11, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) conducts high-speed turn drills in the Atlantic Ocean during sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3nd Class Juan A. Cubano/Released)

 

Lincoln’s return coincides with a paper released by the Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson, entitled “The Future Navy” that lays out a road map for the direction we need to take in order to meet the renewed maritime competition that has been developing over the past decade. He writes, “We must get more capability out of what we already own and bring new technologies and platforms into the mix as rapidly as possible.”

Lincoln is a great example of that! Sailors, shipyard workers and contractors worked side-by-side refueling the ship’s propulsion plant, modernizing combat systems and upgrading infrastructure to allow CVN-72 to support embarked F-35Cs, the Navy variant of the Joint Strike Fighter. She also has enhanced air search and air traffic control radars, Consolidated Afloat Networks and Enterprise Services (CANES), a modernized Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) suite and even new crew galley equipment.

JAMES RIVER. (May 9, 2017) Lt.j.g. Joel Newberry stands fantail safety watch as a tugboat pushes Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) away from Newport News Shipbuilding for sea trials. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mark Logico/Released)
JAMES RIVER. (May 9, 2017) Lt.j.g. Joel Newberry stands fantail safety watch as a tugboat pushes Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) away from Newport News Shipbuilding for sea trials. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mark Logico/Released)

Altogether, more than 2.5 million man-hours have been reinvested into this amazing ship that now proudly rejoins the fleet.

The CNO goes on to write, “Most importantly, the future fleet must be on station ASAP!”  That is something we are striving to do and I am proud to say our CVNs are excelling in this respect.

Right now, the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) carrier strike groups (CSG) are operating in the Western Pacific while the USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77) CSG is in the Arabian Gulf conducting combat operations against ISIS. Additionally, the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) and USS Nimitz (CVN 68) CSGs are fully trained and ready to deploy in support of America’s national interests. Meantime, our CSGs at home are hard at work training to become combat ready as evidence by USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) completion of her tailored ship training availability while both USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) are tracking to on-time completions of their maintenance availability.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Dec. 16, 2011) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) is underway on deployment to the 5th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Zachary S. Welch/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Dec. 16, 2011) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) is underway on deployment to the 5th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Zachary S. Welch/Released)

This increasing pace of our force development to force generation to force employment is reflective of the investments we have made in/by our Optimized Fleet Response Plan.

We are accomplishing great things as a Navy and it is all thanks to the professional, dedicated Sailors who work diligently to ensure the security and prosperity of our great Nation and stability in the global commons around the world. This is why we have a Navy and it is why we continue to have the strongest Navy in the world.

As we look to the future, it is not hard to see that the operational environment is fast evolving. According to the CNO, “These changes are shifting the character of naval competition, and warfare and are being exploited, to varying degrees, by a range of competitors.” To combat this, now more than ever, our nuclear-powered aircraft carriers with their embarked air wings and their associated surface combatants will continue to serve as visible reminders of America’s capability and capacity to conduct prompt and sustained combat operations at and from the sea.

JAMES RIVER, Va. (May 9, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) departs Newport News, Va., under its own power for the first time after successfully completing its mid-life refueling and complex overhaul. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Herbst/Released)
JAMES RIVER, Va. (May 9, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) departs Newport News, Va., under its own power for the first time after successfully completing its mid-life refueling and complex overhaul. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Herbst/Released)

 

In closing, I’d like to extent a hearty “Bravo Zulu” to all those who breathed new life into Abraham Lincoln and to thank you for your tireless efforts in getting the ship back to the fleet, as well as every other Sailor across the Navy that continues to train and stands ready to fight for American’s security and prosperity.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/05/22/uss-abraham-lincoln-return-brings-cvn-fleet-one-step-closer-to-meeting-the-future-navy/ U.S. Navy