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Ten Takeaways: The Education for Seapower Report

Ten Take-Aways: The Education for Seapower Report

In February 2019, the Department of the Navy issued its landmark Education for Seapower (E4S) Report, calling for major reform and improvement of our system of naval education for commissioned and enlisted Sailors and Marines. The Department of the Navy is beginning to implement the report’s recommendations at the direction of the Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer, through his memorandum to all naval forces. When fully implemented, these changes to our education and promotion systems will have a profound impact on our naval services. Because of this, it is essential that policy makers and indeed our entire force understand the report and its conclusions. I recommend that everyone read the full E4S report: it is filled with important insights into the nature of seapower in the 21st century and the essential contribution of education and intellectual development to maintaining naval dominance. Since, however, the main section of the report is 71 pages long, I thought it would be useful to summarize its main conclusions and recommendations. Accordingly, here is my take on the 10 most important takeaways you need to know about the future of Navy and Marine Corps education from the E4S report.

1.         Education of our force is vital to national security 

After exhaustive study of the strategic challenges we face as a nation, the E4S Board concluded: “The education of our naval leaders is the single most important way to prepare the Naval services, and the nation, for a dangerous and uncertain future.” As retired Admiral James Stavridis observed in the report, “In the end, 21st century warfare is brain-on-brain conflict, and we must build our human capital and intellectual capacity as surely as we produce the best pure war fighting technology if we are going to win the nation’s wars and advance its security.” 

2.         Our current educational efforts are inadequate 

Because our intellectual capital is so vital to our nation’s security, developing that capital through education becomes a top priority, at least as important as building platforms and weapons systems. The E4S report concluded that our current system of educating Sailors and Marines is “insufficient to create the operational and strategic leaders needed for the modern Navy and Marine Corps.” Indeed, the report noted that in some respects, we have gone backwards. “While 98% of Flag officers had attended the Naval War College on the eve of World War II, today, only roughly 20% have.”

NEWPORT, R.I. (March 19, 2018) U.S. Naval War College (NWC) students participate in a learning game beta test by NWC’s Joint Military Operations and Wargaming departments. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jess Lewis/Released)

3.         Immediate action is necessary

Unlike a weapons system, we can’t just buy a strategically-minded senior non-commissioned officer or field grade staff officer – it takes years of education and the right motivation to develop the creativity and critical thinking required to lead through an uncertain future. The E4S board concluded that inadequate intellectual development of our force “is THE fundamental problem that must be corrected now.” We need to strengthen our capabilities in leadership and ethics, strategic education, technology and science, organizational management, logistics and acquisition. Failure to change and improve, the report noted, would be a “strategic blunder.” This will require a major cultural shift, so that every naval warfare community and discipline recognizes the full value of education to our national security. 

4.         We must invest in and support our educational institutions

After studying the Naval War College, U.S. Naval Academy, Naval Postgraduate School, and Marine Corps University, the E4S Board concluded that though these schools have proud histories and talented faculty, they are “underfunded, under-prioritized, under-utilized, and disconnected from one another, without any unifying strategic vision or purpose.” The report noted in particular that “Faculty are not receiving enough funding to teach effectively, develop professionally, and conduct research.” To fix these problems, the report calls for the creation of a unified Naval University System, changes to intellectual property rules for faculty, major budget process reforms within the Pentagon, and an increase in high priority funding.

5.         We must create a Naval Community College for enlisted personnel

Our enlisted Marines and Sailors represent a national treasure, both in terms of intellect and selfless dedication to service. Yet we do not provide adequate educational opportunities that will help them develop their vast capacity to help solve the strategic challenges of the future. The report notes that despite many programs to support enlisted education, “valuable talent from the largest part of the services is not being utilized.” To tap into and develop this talent, the report calls for the creation of a Naval Community College offering “rigorous associate of science degree programs for naval sciences, with concentration , such as, data analytics, organizational behavior, and information systems.” 

6.         We need 21st century education

The E4S report recognizes that residential education delivered over an extended period of time in a traditional campus setting is a very valuable educational tool, but that deployments and operational and training needs often make residential education difficult to obtain. To address this problem, the report calls for adoption of more flexible education delivery models, including short executive courses, stackable certificates that lead to degrees over time, and better use of available technology to deliver education outside the brick and mortar classroom. The report also calls for two important changes in emphasis in our school curriculums: coursework leading to “greater understanding of emerging technologies,” and “more theoretical education in order to develop true critical thinkers and leaders.”  

NEWPORT, R.I. (Aug. 15, 2018) Lt. Sarah Miller of Lacey, Washington, an instructor at Surface Warfare Officers School (SWOS), discusses virtual conning of a ship with Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) Midshipman 3rd Class Christopher Anstett, of Buffalo, New York, a student at State University of New York Maritime College, during the 2018 NROTC National Shiphandler of the Year competition. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nardel Gervacio/Released)

7.         The Navy must adopt school selection standards

Achieving a high-quality educational outcomes means much more than retaining the best professors or creating challenging curricula. The E4S report noted deep concerns about how Navy officers are selected for and perform at graduate professional military education schools.  “Leaders candidly observed that the Navy often sends poorly qualified officers to fill quotas. This practice includes sending non-due course officers, junior officers to senior programs, and restricted line officers, such as dental officers and chaplains, to fill quotas meant for unrestricted line officers.” As a result, Navy officers “consistently underperform the officers of other services.” To remedy this problem, the report calls for “competitive in-residence graduate selection boards” similar to those already adopted by the Marine Corps – a process that has already begun in the Navy and is still being refined by both services.

8.         The Navy must change its evaluation and promotion system to value education

For education to truly matter to the naval services, excellence in learning must be recognized and rewarded. The E4S report concluded that while Marine officers and enlisted personnel are required to pursue and complete education coursework to qualify for promotion, many Navy officers do not, because education is not seen as necessary or valuable to career advancement.  “Education is currently viewed as an obstruction in naval career paths by the majority, an obstruction exacerbated by the needs of the personnel assignment system,” and “there are not enough incentives for the personnel to continue higher education.” The report thus recommends significant changes to how we evaluate and promote officers, to insure that career incentives promote, not discourage, educational and intellectual development.

SAN DIEGO (June 1, 2018) Capt. Richard LeBron, executive officer of the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), places a lieutenant shoulder board onto the uniform of Lt. j.g. Allen On, the ship’s safety officer, during a promotion ceremony aboard the USS Midway Museum. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel Charest)

9.         Leaders must take responsibility for education in their command

If we want our forces to reach their full strategic and operational potential, our officer and enlisted leaders must model a commitment to excellence in lifelong learning. The E4S report notes that though it is critical for leaders in our force to pursue their own intellectual development, this alone is not sufficient. In addition, our leaders need to “assume responsibility for the education of their charges.” This means that leaders at all levels, both commissioned and noncommissioned, must help the Marines and Sailors they command identify, obtain and complete the academic coursework we need for our national security.

10.       Improving education is a team effort          

Finally, the E4S report makes clear that all of us, individually and collectively, are responsible for strengthening the intellectual capabilities of our naval forces. Individual Sailors and Marines must pursue more education and take their academic performance just as seriously as they do the performance of their operational duties. Our leaders must obtain world-class education while taking responsibility for the educational advancement of the men and women they lead.  Our educational institutions need to reinvent their curriculums and delivery systems so that greater educational impact can be achieved for sea services that are by definition continually deployed. And the Department of the Navy as a whole must invest in our schools and make badly needed reforms to our personnel systems so that education becomes a top priority.  These reforms are not optional. This is a fight we must win if we are to do our duty to protect national security. 

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/10/17/ten-takeaways-the-education-for-seapower-report/ poyrazdogany

Under Secretary Modly’s Remarks at U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2018 Graduation

The following are Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly’s  remarks for the U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2018’s graduation and commissioning ceremony in Annapolis, Md., May 25.

Mr. President, members of Congress, Admiral Richardson, General Walters, Vice Admiral Carter, distinguished guests, faculty and staff of this national treasure of an institution.

To the parents, families, and friends of the great Class of 2018 – thank you for being here to honor and celebrate this tremendous accomplishment, but more importantly, for putting your faith, hope and prayers behind these young Navy and Marine Corps officers.

Soon they will depart from this place to assume positions of massive responsibility, defending our nation and contributing their intellect, passion and skill to sustaining the greatest, most powerful and lethal maritime force the world has ever known—and will ever know.

Parents, thank you for raising such outstanding citizens.  And to our sponsor families from the Annapolis area, thanks for picking up where those parents left off, and opening your homes and providing comfort and support to this class over the last four years.

Finally, to the awesome Class of 2018 – congratulations! And relax!

No more panic attacks when you hear the 10 minute chow calls, no more worrying about the quality of your tuck at restriction musters, no more sitting at your desks in a class A uniform during room tours, no more cramming for final exams, no more alpha room inspections. And at least for you new ensigns, no more parade practices, parades or platoon drill! Let’s hear it for that!

Sorry, Marines, the joy of marching in parades that you all came to love in your four years here at the academy will continue for you for many more years – but I guarantee that your future parades will have a level of precision that you probably didn’t experience here!

Class of 2018, you will soon discover that life away from the academy will be very different. Just imagine, you can now learn what it is like to actually sleep under your covers, instead of on top of them.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (May 25, 2018) From left, Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Glenn M. Walters, Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas B. Modly, President Donald J. Trump, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John M. Richardson and Vice Adm. Walter E. "Ted" Carter, Jr. stand for the National Anthem during the U.S. Naval Academy's Class of 2018 graduation and commissioning ceremony. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Hailey D. Clay/Released)
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (May 25, 2018) From left, Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Glenn M. Walters, Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas B. Modly, President Donald J. Trump, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John M. Richardson and Vice Adm. Walter E. “Ted” Carter, Jr. stand for the National Anthem during the U.S. Naval Academy’s Class of 2018 graduation and commissioning ceremony. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Hailey D. Clay/Released)

 

You can also expand on the passionate love of the ballet and opera that you developed during the Distinguished Artist Series at Alumni Hall.

And, perhaps most importantly, you will finally have the time and independence to prepare some of your favorite meals from King Hall in your own homes.

Just think, culinary expressions like Mystery Meatballs, King Hall Meatloaf and Kale Wraps don’t have to be distant fond memories. Contact the supply officer for more information on this, but please, no more death threats about the Kale Wraps!

But on to more serious matters, it was 35 years ago on this very day that I was sitting where you are, and I walked across this very stage and received my diploma from the Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable John Lehman. It was at a time in history not unlike the one we are facing today.

After years of neglect and insufficient defense budgets, our Navy was just beginning to receive the huge shot in the arm it required to face down the growing Soviet threat. The national resolve inspired and embodied by President Reagan at the time of my commissioning rebuilt our military, and most importantly, our Navy, so that the Soviet Union had no choice but to retreat and eventually collapse into the annals of its own inglorious past.

In its wake came the liberation of millions of people in nations who suffered under Communist oppression behind the Iron Curtain. One of those nations was Hungary, a place where my own father escaped in the late 1940s to flee Soviet-imposed tyranny.

I recall this point of history to you today not because it is personal for me, but because of its relevance for you. Just as I was fortunate to serve under President Reagan, you should recognize how fortunate you are to be serving today under a commander in chief who believes what President Reagan believed – that our national security should be guided by the clearest of principles.  That principle is “Peace Through Strength.”

This is not a political tag line. It is a geo-political truth. It is particularly true for a nation such as the United States, with our broad global interests, important friendships, and our fundamental desire to see our people and the people of the world prosper under the guiding lights of individual liberty and human dignity.

Weakness in pursuit of such aspirations invites aggression – and it always will.

As you are commissioned today, be grateful that the American people through their elected representatives in Washington, from the president to the Congress, recognize this fact and have committed the resources to give you what you need to deter our adversaries – or to dominate and defeat them, if necessary. I can assure you that not every nation in the world stands up for its principles in this way – nor do they invest the resources to make it so.

Second, just as I and my classmates never saw the demise of the Soviet Union coming, you may also be surprised at the good that can accrue to the world through what you will be doing every single day you serve.

You may not recognize this fully in the routine of your daily jobs, but as long as you lead and inspire a strong Navy and Marine Corps team – one that is prepared for any adversary, I guarantee that some significant and world-altering good will come of it over time.

In fact, I am certain that as you look back on your own careers, 35 years from now – just as I am doing nostalgically today – you will find that some symbol of oppression, not unlike the now extinct Soviet Red Star, will have been relegated to the dust bin of history because of what you did to sustain the strength and lethality of the United States Navy and Marine Corps.

It will happen because, as we have learned, tyranny and oppression cannot survive contact for long against a powerful military force – one that is anchored by a people, and an officer corps, of high moral character: officers, who in addition to their courage, also maintain a passion for peace and prosperity for all citizens of the world.  That is who you are, and the world you are entering today as officers in the United States military is going to be a better place for it.

In closing, let me say that although this is truly a great day in your lives, it is unlikely to be even in the 10 of your greatest days in uniform. Rather, you will find those greatest days in the moments when you see the people you have lead, trained, educated, mentored, tutored, commanded – and yes, even reprimanded, perform well beyond your expectations.

As officers in the United States military, you are given tremendous responsibility to respect and protect those who are placed under your command.  The American people entrust you with their sons and daughters, and they place their security and the security of the nation, in your hands.  Do not expect to be loved by everyone for this – even though it may happen, on occasion.

As Secretary Mattis is fond of saying to those of us who are honored now to serve in the Pentagon, “Your job is to protect the nation,” so I commend to you the following advice to make this important, and often difficult job, far easier on yourselves.

That advice is this: Don’t ever worry about being loved for what you do. Rather, love the country you are asked to defend. Love the Constitution you just pledged your lives to protect. And most importantly, love the people you have the privilege to lead.

Make sure they eat before you do. Care about their families, as much as you do your own. Be vested in their successes, more than your own individual accomplishments. Nurture their careers, more than you pursue your own advancement. And value their lives, to the point that you will always consider their safety and security in every decision you make – and you will do this best by making sure they know how to fight and win.

It is only through this level of servant leadership that you will maximize and empower those you will lead to meet the demands they will face in this dynamic century. It will also accrue tremendous personal satisfaction to you during your time of service. It will foster truly great moments that will make the elation you are feeling today seem almost trivial.

This is the kind of job satisfaction that only service in the Armed Forces of the United States of America can provide, so prepare yourselves to experience it over and over and over and to treasure it every single time.

Newly commissioned officers of the Class of 2018, you are about to embark on the journey of your lives. Your service is noble. Your service is just. Your service will make this country and the world a better place.

Today, we thank you in advance for your leadership, and for the sacrifices each of you will make to keep us safe and free!

And today, be assured – we love you!

Class of 2018: Go Navy!

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/05/31/under-secretary-modlys-remarks-at-u-s-naval-academy-class-of-2018-graduation/ U.S. Navy

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

President Donald J. Trump presents the Medal of Honor to retired Master Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Britt Slabinski during a ceremony at the White House in Washington, D.C. Slabinski received the Medal of Honor for his actions during Operation Anaconda in Afghanistan in March 2002. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Raymond D. Diaz III/Released)
U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen from the Class of 2018 toss their covers in the air during the graduation and commissioning ceremony at Navy/Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Elliott Fabrizio/Released)
Airman Apprentice Hunter Horton-Harmash mans the bell during the Hindenburg Memorial Ceremony at Joint Base McGuire-Dix in Lakehurst, N.J. The bell was rung after the names of the crew and passengers of the Hindenburg were read. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Stanley Moy/Released)
Rear Adm. Gregory Fenton, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Japan, poses with the Japanese wreath presenters after a memorial service at Gyokusenji Temple in remembrance of U.S. service members whose remains rest at the temple. (U.S. Navy photo by Daniel A. Taylor/Released)
Allison Galdorisi, from Staten Island, takes a selfie with members of the U.S. Fleet Forces Band. The band performed during the Navy aviation event at Miller Field in Staten Island during Fleet Week New York. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Gulianna Dunn/Released)
Sailors assigned to the “Fighting Checkmates” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 211 move ordnance on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Thomas Gooley/Released)
Hospitalman Apprentice Ana Sierra-Crispin checks a six-year-old patient’s blood pressure at Naval Hospital Jacksonville’s pediatrics clinic. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel/Released)
Capt. Jon Duffy, right, commodore of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15, welcomes Cmdr. Jennifer Pontius, commanding officer of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Milius (DDG 69), upon the ship’s arrival to the Yokosuka, Japan, to join the U.S. 7th Fleet as part of DESRON-15. Milius increases Task Force 70’s ability to promote security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region as one of the most capable ships in the Navy. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Codie L. Soule/Released)
Quartermaster 2nd Class Frederick Penlebury, assigned to Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 3, mans the M240 machine gun aboard a Mark VI patrol boat during a final evaluation problem conducted by Coastal Riverine Group (CRG) 1’s Training and Evaluation Unit. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Boatswain’s Mate Nelson Doromal Jr./Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/05/31/faces-of-the-fleet-269/ ltall

Hopper: Innovation, Transformation, Inspiration

By Rear Adm. Brian Fort
Commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific

During last month’s historic first visit of the voyaging canoe Hokule‘a to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson spoke about his father, Myron “Pinky” Thompson, who was 15 years old at the time of the attack on Oahu Dec. 7, 1941. As soon as he was able, Pinky Thompson, like a lot of other young men at the time, falsified his age and joined the military to serve his country.

Women in the 1940s did not have as many opportunities to serve in uniform but the war opened occupations and doors, including for a smart mathematician named Grace Murray Hopper. Hopper wanted to join the military but, like Pinky Thompson, she had an obstacle because of her age. In her case, in her mid-30s, she was deemed too old to enlist.

Feisty and gritty Hopper didn’t give up though.

Just as she would do throughout her life, Hopper rose to the challenge and found solutions. When her chance came in 1943, she signed up with the U.S. Navy Reserve – that was 75 years ago. She went to work as a wartime problem solver – one of our first pioneers in modern computer programming.

Capt. Grace Hopper, then head of the Navy Programming Language Section of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, discusses a phase of her work with a staff member in August 1976. (U.S. Navy photo by PH2 David C. MacLean/Released)
Capt. Grace Hopper, then head of the Navy Programming Language Section of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, discusses a phase of her work with a staff member in August 1976. (U.S. Navy photo by PH2 David C. MacLean/Released)

 

She and her team took a systematic approach to coding: finding effective, accurate and universal ways for humans to communicate with machines and vice versa.

Think about that the next time you talk to your smartphone, tablet or voice-controlled home speaker.

Earlier in her career, Hopper served as an educator at Vassar, training and transforming minds. Within the Navy she became a programmer with Harvard and Yale, where she transformed the technology of the future. She served throughout her life – in and out of uniform – to transform the concept of a woman’s role in society, one based on equality of opportunity.

Hopper mentored and inspired young women and men to look for innovative ways to serve. She had no time for complacency, stale thinking or laziness. And she and her teams always carefully assessed their performance to look for opportunities to improve processes and technology.

Most recently “Amazing Grace’s” namesake, USS Hopper (DDG 70) – one of our ten homeported ships at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam – returned to Hawaii after a successful deployment to the Western Pacific and Arabian Gulf. Hopper was deployed 12 of the past 18 months.

Team Hopper proved their ability to keep the peace through their forward presence, but always ready to conduct prompt and sustained combat at sea if necessary. Hopper is among our ships adapting to the emerging security environment in the Indo-Pacific and ready to operate in a growingly complex, transforming world.

On their deployment, Sailors aboard Hopper proved their skills and abilities working with the America Amphibious Ready Group, United States Marines, and the Australian navy. They visited Bahrain, Singapore and Guam, and they built cooperative partnerships.

Hopper’s Sailors, of course, relied on state-of-the-art computers. While, today’s complex shipboard computer systems would no doubt amaze USS Hopper’s “Amazing” namesake, I suspect she would take it all in stride.

As a further testament to Rear Adm. Grace Hopper’s legacy, the U.S. Naval Academy is building Hopper Hall, to be named for the computer scientist pioneer. Hopper Hall, located between Nimitz Library and Rickover Hall, will be a modern $107-million academic facility dedicated to cyber security studies.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (Oct. 21, 2016) The official party of the Hopper Hall ground breaking ceremony at the United States Naval Academy (USNA) dig out a scoop of dirt. Hopper Hall, which will house USNA's Center for Cyber Studies, is the namesake of Rear Adm. Grace Hopper who is often referred to as 'The Mother of Computing'. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Brianna Jones/Released)
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (Oct. 21, 2016) The official party of the Hopper Hall ground breaking ceremony at the United States Naval Academy (USNA) dig out a scoop of dirt. Hopper Hall, which will house USNA’s Center for Cyber Studies, is the namesake of Rear Adm. Grace Hopper who is often referred to as ‘The Mother of Computing’. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Brianna Jones/Released)

 

The facility is expected to be completed by early 2020, appropriately at the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution giving women the right to vote. According to the Naval Academy this will be the first building at any of the three major service academies to be named after a woman.

By the way, the Naval Academy is also teaching courses along both ends of the exploration spectrum: from futuristic and innovative cyber security – including a major in cyber operations – to ancient celestial navigation as practiced by the Polynesian Voyaging Society aboard Hokule‘a.

Putting it all together, USS Hopper returned from her recent deployment just in time to be part of the aloha whistle welcome for the arrival of Hokule‘a Feb. 10. As the voyaging canoe entered Pearl Harbor, she also sailed past memorials including USS Arizona, USS Nevada, USS Utah and the Battleship Missouri – symbols of how our Navy helped transform our world, bringing freedom and democracy to Japan and other nations who are now allies, a transformation Grace Hopper was part of. That transformation gave greater rights and equality to women in the decades that followed, especially in our Navy.

During Hokule‘a’s week at JBPHH in February, women and men of the Polynesian Voyaging Society provided hands-on Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics education for 2,000 students and other visitors.

Just like Rear Adm. Grace Hopper – innovative, transformational and inspirational.

PEARL HARBOR (Feb. 10, 2018) The traditional Polynesian double-hulled voyaging canoe, Hokule‘a, renders honors as it passes by the USS Arizona Memorial during its first-ever visit to the waters of Pearl Harbor. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeff Troutman/Released)
PEARL HARBOR (Feb. 10, 2018) The traditional Polynesian double-hulled voyaging canoe, Hokule‘a, renders honors as it passes by the USS Arizona Memorial during its first-ever visit to the waters of Pearl Harbor. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeff Troutman/Released)

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/03/14/hopper-innovation-transformation-inspiration/ U.S. Navy

Hopper: Innovation, Transformation, Inspiration

By Rear Adm. Brian Fort
Commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific

During last month’s historic first visit of the voyaging canoe Hokule‘a to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson spoke about his father, Myron “Pinky” Thompson, who was 15 years old at the time of the attack on Oahu Dec. 7, 1941. As soon as he was able, Pinky Thompson, like a lot of other young men at the time, falsified his age and joined the military to serve his country.

Women in the 1940s did not have as many opportunities to serve in uniform but the war opened occupations and doors, including for a smart mathematician named Grace Murray Hopper. Hopper wanted to join the military but, like Pinky Thompson, she had an obstacle because of her age. In her case, in her mid-30s, she was deemed too old to enlist.

Feisty and gritty Hopper didn’t give up though.

Just as she would do throughout her life, Hopper rose to the challenge and found solutions. When her chance came in 1943, she signed up with the U.S. Navy Reserve – that was 75 years ago. She went to work as a wartime problem solver – one of our first pioneers in modern computer programming.

Capt. Grace Hopper, then head of the Navy Programming Language Section of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, discusses a phase of her work with a staff member in August 1976. (U.S. Navy photo by PH2 David C. MacLean/Released)
Capt. Grace Hopper, then head of the Navy Programming Language Section of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, discusses a phase of her work with a staff member in August 1976. (U.S. Navy photo by PH2 David C. MacLean/Released)

 

She and her team took a systematic approach to coding: finding effective, accurate and universal ways for humans to communicate with machines and vice versa.

Think about that the next time you talk to your smartphone, tablet or voice-controlled home speaker.

Earlier in her career, Hopper served as an educator at Vassar, training and transforming minds. Within the Navy she became a programmer with Harvard and Yale, where she transformed the technology of the future. She served throughout her life – in and out of uniform – to transform the concept of a woman’s role in society, one based on equality of opportunity.

Hopper mentored and inspired young women and men to look for innovative ways to serve. She had no time for complacency, stale thinking or laziness. And she and her teams always carefully assessed their performance to look for opportunities to improve processes and technology.

Most recently “Amazing Grace’s” namesake, USS Hopper (DDG 70) – one of our ten homeported ships at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam – returned to Hawaii after a successful deployment to the Western Pacific and Arabian Gulf. Hopper was deployed 12 of the past 18 months.

Team Hopper proved their ability to keep the peace through their forward presence, but always ready to conduct prompt and sustained combat at sea if necessary. Hopper is among our ships adapting to the emerging security environment in the Indo-Pacific and ready to operate in a growingly complex, transforming world.

On their deployment, Sailors aboard Hopper proved their skills and abilities working with the America Amphibious Ready Group, United States Marines, and the Australian navy. They visited Bahrain, Singapore and Guam, and they built cooperative partnerships.

Hopper’s Sailors, of course, relied on state-of-the-art computers. While, today’s complex shipboard computer systems would no doubt amaze USS Hopper’s “Amazing” namesake, I suspect she would take it all in stride.

As a further testament to Rear Adm. Grace Hopper’s legacy, the U.S. Naval Academy is building Hopper Hall, to be named for the computer scientist pioneer. Hopper Hall, located between Nimitz Library and Rickover Hall, will be a modern $107-million academic facility dedicated to cyber security studies.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (Oct. 21, 2016) The official party of the Hopper Hall ground breaking ceremony at the United States Naval Academy (USNA) dig out a scoop of dirt. Hopper Hall, which will house USNA's Center for Cyber Studies, is the namesake of Rear Adm. Grace Hopper who is often referred to as 'The Mother of Computing'. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Brianna Jones/Released)
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (Oct. 21, 2016) The official party of the Hopper Hall ground breaking ceremony at the United States Naval Academy (USNA) dig out a scoop of dirt. Hopper Hall, which will house USNA’s Center for Cyber Studies, is the namesake of Rear Adm. Grace Hopper who is often referred to as ‘The Mother of Computing’. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Brianna Jones/Released)

 

The facility is expected to be completed by early 2020, appropriately at the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution giving women the right to vote. According to the Naval Academy this will be the first building at any of the three major service academies to be named after a woman.

By the way, the Naval Academy is also teaching courses along both ends of the exploration spectrum: from futuristic and innovative cyber security – including a major in cyber operations – to ancient celestial navigation as practiced by the Polynesian Voyaging Society aboard Hokule‘a.

Putting it all together, USS Hopper returned from her recent deployment just in time to be part of the aloha whistle welcome for the arrival of Hokule‘a Feb. 10. As the voyaging canoe entered Pearl Harbor, she also sailed past memorials including USS Arizona, USS Nevada, USS Utah and the Battleship Missouri – symbols of how our Navy helped transform our world, bringing freedom and democracy to Japan and other nations who are now allies, a transformation Grace Hopper was part of. That transformation gave greater rights and equality to women in the decades that followed, especially in our Navy.

During Hokule‘a’s week at JBPHH in February, women and men of the Polynesian Voyaging Society provided hands-on Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics education for 2,000 students and other visitors.

Just like Rear Adm. Grace Hopper – innovative, transformational and inspirational.

PEARL HARBOR (Feb. 10, 2018) The traditional Polynesian double-hulled voyaging canoe, Hokule‘a, renders honors as it passes by the USS Arizona Memorial during its first-ever visit to the waters of Pearl Harbor. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeff Troutman/Released)
PEARL HARBOR (Feb. 10, 2018) The traditional Polynesian double-hulled voyaging canoe, Hokule‘a, renders honors as it passes by the USS Arizona Memorial during its first-ever visit to the waters of Pearl Harbor. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeff Troutman/Released)

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/03/14/hopper-innovation-transformation-inspiration/ U.S. Navy

Faces of the Fleet: U.S. Naval Academy Plebe Parents’ Weekend

Starting college can be tough on students as well as their parents. Now, imagine saying goodbye before six weeks of a fast-paced, boot camp-style orientation that begins four years of preparing U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen to become commissioned naval officers.

This past weekend, parents and friends of the incoming freshmen – known as plebes at the academy – saw each other for the first time during Plebe Parents’ Weekend. As you can see, parents and friends can be shocked to see how much their loved ones changed during Plebe Summer, which challenged the new midshipmen to develop leadership ability, motivation, moral courage, teamwork and physical strength.

Thousands of family members and friends filled the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 11, for Plebe Parents' Weekend. Plebe Parents' Weekend, August 10-13, provided an opportunity for parents to reunite with their plebes (freshmen) after an intensive six weeks of Plebe Summer training that paves the way to a midshipman's freshman year at USNA. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

Thousands of family members and friends filled the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 11, for Plebe Parents' Weekend. Plebe Parents' Weekend, August 10-13, provided an opportunity for parents to reunite with their plebes (freshmen) after an intensive six weeks of Plebe Summer training that paves the way to a midshipman's freshman year at USNA. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

Thousands of family members and friends filled the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 11, for Plebe Parents' Weekend. Plebe Parents' Weekend, August 10-13, provided an opportunity for parents to reunite with their plebes (freshmen) after an intensive six weeks of Plebe Summer training that paves the way to a midshipman's freshman year at USNA. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

Thousands of family members and friends filled the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 11, for Plebe Parents' Weekend. Plebe Parents' Weekend, August 10-13, provided an opportunity for parents to reunite with their plebes (freshmen) after an intensive six weeks of Plebe Summer training that paves the way to a midshipman's freshman year at USNA. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

Thousands of family members and friends filled the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 11, for Plebe Parents' Weekend. Plebe Parents' Weekend, August 10-13, provided an opportunity for parents to reunite with their plebes (freshmen) after an intensive six weeks of Plebe Summer training that paves the way to a midshipman's freshman year at USNA. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

Thousands of family members and friends filled the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 11, for Plebe Parents' Weekend. Plebe Parents' Weekend, August 10-13, provided an opportunity for parents to reunite with their plebes (freshmen) after an intensive six weeks of Plebe Summer training that paves the way to a midshipman's freshman year at USNA. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/08/14/faces-of-the-fleet-u-s-naval-academy-plebe-parents-weekend/ Jason Kelly

Faces of the Fleet: U.S. Naval Academy Plebe Parents’ Weekend

Starting college can be tough on students as well as their parents. Now, imagine saying goodbye before six weeks of a fast-paced, boot camp-style orientation that begins four years of preparing U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen to become commissioned naval officers.

This past weekend, parents and friends of the incoming freshmen – known as plebes at the academy – saw each other for the first time during Plebe Parents’ Weekend. As you can see, parents and friends can be shocked to see how much their loved ones changed during Plebe Summer, which challenged the new midshipmen to develop leadership ability, motivation, moral courage, teamwork and physical strength.

Thousands of family members and friends filled the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 11, for Plebe Parents' Weekend. Plebe Parents' Weekend, August 10-13, provided an opportunity for parents to reunite with their plebes (freshmen) after an intensive six weeks of Plebe Summer training that paves the way to a midshipman's freshman year at USNA. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

Thousands of family members and friends filled the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 11, for Plebe Parents' Weekend. Plebe Parents' Weekend, August 10-13, provided an opportunity for parents to reunite with their plebes (freshmen) after an intensive six weeks of Plebe Summer training that paves the way to a midshipman's freshman year at USNA. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

Thousands of family members and friends filled the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 11, for Plebe Parents' Weekend. Plebe Parents' Weekend, August 10-13, provided an opportunity for parents to reunite with their plebes (freshmen) after an intensive six weeks of Plebe Summer training that paves the way to a midshipman's freshman year at USNA. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

Thousands of family members and friends filled the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 11, for Plebe Parents' Weekend. Plebe Parents' Weekend, August 10-13, provided an opportunity for parents to reunite with their plebes (freshmen) after an intensive six weeks of Plebe Summer training that paves the way to a midshipman's freshman year at USNA. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

Thousands of family members and friends filled the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 11, for Plebe Parents' Weekend. Plebe Parents' Weekend, August 10-13, provided an opportunity for parents to reunite with their plebes (freshmen) after an intensive six weeks of Plebe Summer training that paves the way to a midshipman's freshman year at USNA. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

Thousands of family members and friends filled the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 11, for Plebe Parents' Weekend. Plebe Parents' Weekend, August 10-13, provided an opportunity for parents to reunite with their plebes (freshmen) after an intensive six weeks of Plebe Summer training that paves the way to a midshipman's freshman year at USNA. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/08/14/faces-of-the-fleet-u-s-naval-academy-plebe-parents-weekend/ Jason Kelly

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

Naval Aircrewman 1st Class Jonathan Smitherman, assigned to “The Night Dippersâ€? of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 5, flies aboard an MH-60S Seahawk into Eisenhower State Park in New York during an aviation demonstration and static display as part of 2017 Fleet Week New York (FWNY). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles Oki/Released)
Members of the U.S. Naval Forces Europe Band perform in a Memorial Day ceremony at the Sicily-Rome American Cemetery. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Theron J. Godbold /Released)
Operations Specialist Seamen Jacob Tynes, right, from Terra Bella, Calif., and Cesar Gonzalez, from Omaha, Neb., stand lookout as the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) departs from Sasebo, Japan, for a scheduled routine patrol. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Gavin Shields/Released)
The color guard present the colors during a change of command ceremony for the Avenger-class mine countermeasures ship USS Pioneer (MCM 9). Lt. Cmdr. Brett Jasionowski relieved Lt. Cmdr. Scott Jones as commanding officer of the ship. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jordan Crouch/Released)
Cmdr. Anthony Webber, left, commanding officer of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey (DDG 105) and Cmdr. Hiroyuki Yokote, from the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force ship JS Izumo (DDH 183), discuss notes during a brief for a bilateral exercise between Dewey and JS Izumo (DDH 183) and JS Sazanami (DD 113). (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kryzentia Weiermann/Released)
Cmdr. Nathan Harrell, of the “Spartans” of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 oversees helicopter flight operations aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Tristan B. Lotz/Released)
U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen from the Class of 2017 toss their covers in the air during the graduation and commissioning ceremony at Navy/Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Anthony Koch/Released)
Logistics Specialist Tristen Blair, top, from Brighton, Tenn., and Logistics Specialist Zack Smith, from Lexington, S.C., are raised out of the water during a search and rescue exercise off the bow of the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard/Released)
Sailors assigned to the Naval Station Guantanamo Bay weapons department fire a 21-gun salute using a 40 mm saluting cannon on Memorial Day in honor of the brave service members that have died in the line of duty. (U. S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd class John Philip Wagner, Jr./Released)
Electronics Technician Seaman Keion Nathan, from Matthews, N.C., handles a mooring line on the fantail of the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) as the ship prepares to get underway. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/06/02/faces-of-the-fleet-246/ ltall

U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2017 Graduation

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of the U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2017’s graduation. Vice President Mike Pence will speak at the graduation and commissioning ceremony, May 26.

The ceremony is scheduled to begin 10 a.m. EDT.

Join the #USNavy conversation on social media on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and Flickr.

Congratulate the graduates by leaving a comment below.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/05/26/u-s-naval-academy-class-of-2017-graduation/ U.S. Navy