Rustic American Flag Gunny's Job Board

Category Archives: Battle of Midway

Then and Now: Midway and Submarine Force

By Rear Adm. Blake Converse, Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet

“When I assumed command of the Pacific Fleet on 31 December 1941, our submarines were already operating against the enemy, the only units of the fleet that could come to grips with the Japanese for months to come. It was to the submarine force that I looked to carry the load. It is to the everlasting honor and glory of our submarine personnel that they never failed us in our days of great peril.” — Adm. Chester Nimitz, Commander, U.S. Pacific

Midway, a feature-length film scheduled for release on November 8, tells the story of the Sailors who fought so bravely in June 1942 to thwart the Japanese attack at Midway.  This retelling comes at a critical time for our Navy and our nation. Seeing the Battle of Midway on the big screen serves as a reminder of the critical importance of a strong and combat ready Navy to the security of our Nation. 

As you walk the historic submarine piers of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, you see visceral reminders of the beginning of the war and its conclusion – the memorial to USS Arizona (BB-39), which was sunk in the attack on Pearl Harbor, and the battleship USS Missouri (BB-61), on which the peace agreement was signed in Tokyo Harbor to end the war. Adm. Nimitz also walked on these piers during WWII and witnessed both the devastation of the Pearl Harbor attack and the unparalleled industriousness of our Navy and civilian work force as they recovered from that attack, rebuilt our Navy, and set sail to take the fight to the enemy at the Battle of Midway.   

In May 1942, the submarine USS Nautilus (SS 168), under the command of Lt. Cmdr. William Brockman Jr., departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for her first war patrol. Her mission was to search for the Japanese fleet sailing for Midway, and she succeeded.  USS Nautilus assisted in leading U.S. aircraft directly to the Japanese carrier Hiryu and harassing the enemy while our aircraft ravaged the Japanese Fleet. USS Nautilus survived 42 depth charges, several of her torpedoes failed to detonate, and Japanese aircraft and ships spotted her multiple times, forcing Nautilus to dive and evade multiple times. Yet, despite these challenges, the crew’s efforts were critical to the success of the battle and resulted in Brockman receiving the Navy Cross for the Battle of Midway.  

USS Nautilus (SS-168) underway, March 1933. (U.S. National Archives photo.)

U.S. submarines would go on to take the fight to the Japanese across the Pacific, wreaking havoc on the critical maritime supply routes that supported their industry, and ravaging their warships. Although submarines only made up only 2% of our entire Navy during WWII, they sank 30% of Japanese warships and 55% of Japanese merchant ships.  

But this wartime effort was not without significant sacrifice. The U.S. submarine force experienced some of the highest casualty rates of any force in WWII. A foundational part of our training as submariners is the study of this legacy of sacrifice and commitment in the face of the enemy. In this training, we make it a point to ensure that today’s submariners recognize that even though we eventually achieved victory, we were not ready for unrestricted submarine warfare when we entered the fight after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Our weapons were erratic, our tactics unrefined, and our training inadequate to the task. Yes, we eventually overcame each of these obstacles to halt the Japanese advance and set the conditions for victory in the Pacific, but there is no guarantee that the pace of future combat operations will forgive such a lack of foresight and preparation. We have to be ready to deploy and sustain high-end combat operations with little or no warning – and today we exercise that every single day in our Submarine Force. 

USS Tang (SS 306) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, Dec.2, 1943. (Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.)

Last month, we celebrated the return of USS Olympia (SSN 717), our oldest Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine, from her final deployment. Olympia completed a circumnavigation of the earth, transiting both the Panama Canal and Suez Canal, and conducting operations in the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the Pacific Ocean. Shortly after USS Olympia’s successful return, we welcomed home one of our newest Virginia class fast attack submarines, USS Illinois (SSN 786), who returned to Pearl Harbor from her first deployment. She was the first Block II Virginia-class submarine to ever deploy to the Indo-Pacific region, during which, the crew completed a full spectrum of operations to support the highest priority tasking.

USS Illinois (SSN 786) departs Groton, Connecticut to conduct sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat.)

We are in an era of great power competition. Utilizing the strength, determination, and lessons learned from those brave submariners before us, we will continue to be first to the fight, just like at Midway. We are trained, equipped, and ready to fight tonight because we have not forgotten our past.  

Editor’s Note: The four-part “Then and Now” NavyLive blog series is presented so interested audience members have an idea of what’s changed, and what has not, since the famed Battle of Midway. As the nation faces the Great Power Competition, “Midway” is an authentic representation of the Pacific in the opening months of WWII and can help people understand the value we provide today, and honors the toughness, initiative, integrity and accountability that are Sailors’ core attributes. The movie reflects the extraordinary determination and courage of those who fought in WWII, and showcases how the Navy team worked together then, as we do today.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/10/29/then-and-now-midway-and-submarine-force/ poyrazdogany

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

Midshipman 1st Class David Medrano adjusts his cranial during a safety briefing aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dartez C. Williams/Released)
Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Deion Mahone, from Indianapolis, fires a flare gun during a live-fire exercise in the western Pacific aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew Granito/Released)
Vice Adm. Mike Shoemaker, left, commander of Naval Air Forces; Adm. Scott H. Swift, commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet; Vice Adm. Nora Tyson, commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet; Rear Adm. Tim Szymanski, commander of Naval Special Warfare Command; and Rear Adm. Yancy B. Lindsey, commander of Navy Region Southwest, pose for a photo with Battle of Midway veterans during a commemoration of the the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Midway aboard the USS Midway Museum. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Class Paolo Bayas/Released)
Air Traffic Controller 1st Class Justin Brown looks out over the airfield from the Air Traffic Control Tower at Naval Air Station Patuxent River. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Patrick Gordon/Released)
Cmdr. John W. Stafford, commanding officer of the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Cheyenne (SSN 773), has a wreath placed around his neck during a gift exchange as Cheyenne pulls into Busan for a scheduled port visit while conducting routine patrols throughout the western Pacific. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jermaine Ralliford/Released)
Rear Adm. John Tammen, commander of Submarine Group 9, looks though the periscope in the attack center of Trident Training Facility Bangor’s new Submarine Bridge Trainer (SBT) following the ribbon cutting ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Amanda R. Gray/Released)
Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Briel Gaskins and Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Trey Jacques stand watch aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) while transiting the Suez Canal. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brianna Bowens/Released)
Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Bill M. Sanders photographs the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) as it pulls out for deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex Corona/Released)
Information Systems Technician 1st Class Zachary Crowell, assigned to Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Far East, plays Taps on a bugle during the Battle of Midway commemoration onboard Commander, Fleet Activities Sasebo. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffrey P. Barham/Released)
Sailors assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) perform jumping jacks during command physical training at Naval Station Mayport. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Joe J. Cardona Gonzalez/Released)
Senior Chief Information Systems Technician Latoya Bauman, assigned to Navy Personnel Command, is embraced by her family after she is pinned during a senior chief pinning ceremony at Pat Thompson Conference Center at Naval Support Activity Mid-South (NSA Mid-South). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Dustin Kelling/Released)
Family members participate in Tiger Cruise activities at the small arms marksmanship trainer at Recruit Training Command (RTC). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Gas Turbine Systems Technician Electrical Seth Schaeffer/Released)
Rear Adm. Tim Gallaudet, commander of Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command and oceanographer of the Navy, speaks with Maj. Doug Gautrau, a weather officer assigned to the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron aerial reconnaissance, about his job and the data collected during their mission over the Gulf of Mexico supporting Naval Oceanography Unmanned Systems Operational Demonstration. (U.S. Navy photo by Kaley Turfitt/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/06/09/faces-of-the-fleet-247/ ltall

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

Midshipman 1st Class David Medrano adjusts his cranial during a safety briefing aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dartez C. Williams/Released)
Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Deion Mahone, from Indianapolis, fires a flare gun during a live-fire exercise in the western Pacific aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew Granito/Released)
Vice Adm. Mike Shoemaker, left, commander of Naval Air Forces; Adm. Scott H. Swift, commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet; Vice Adm. Nora Tyson, commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet; Rear Adm. Tim Szymanski, commander of Naval Special Warfare Command; and Rear Adm. Yancy B. Lindsey, commander of Navy Region Southwest, pose for a photo with Battle of Midway veterans during a commemoration of the the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Midway aboard the USS Midway Museum. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Class Paolo Bayas/Released)
Air Traffic Controller 1st Class Justin Brown looks out over the airfield from the Air Traffic Control Tower at Naval Air Station Patuxent River. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Patrick Gordon/Released)
Cmdr. John W. Stafford, commanding officer of the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Cheyenne (SSN 773), has a wreath placed around his neck during a gift exchange as Cheyenne pulls into Busan for a scheduled port visit while conducting routine patrols throughout the western Pacific. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jermaine Ralliford/Released)
Rear Adm. John Tammen, commander of Submarine Group 9, looks though the periscope in the attack center of Trident Training Facility Bangor’s new Submarine Bridge Trainer (SBT) following the ribbon cutting ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Amanda R. Gray/Released)
Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Briel Gaskins and Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Trey Jacques stand watch aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) while transiting the Suez Canal. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brianna Bowens/Released)
Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Bill M. Sanders photographs the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) as it pulls out for deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex Corona/Released)
Information Systems Technician 1st Class Zachary Crowell, assigned to Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Far East, plays Taps on a bugle during the Battle of Midway commemoration onboard Commander, Fleet Activities Sasebo. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffrey P. Barham/Released)
Sailors assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) perform jumping jacks during command physical training at Naval Station Mayport. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Joe J. Cardona Gonzalez/Released)
Senior Chief Information Systems Technician Latoya Bauman, assigned to Navy Personnel Command, is embraced by her family after she is pinned during a senior chief pinning ceremony at Pat Thompson Conference Center at Naval Support Activity Mid-South (NSA Mid-South). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Dustin Kelling/Released)
Family members participate in Tiger Cruise activities at the small arms marksmanship trainer at Recruit Training Command (RTC). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Gas Turbine Systems Technician Electrical Seth Schaeffer/Released)
Rear Adm. Tim Gallaudet, commander of Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command and oceanographer of the Navy, speaks with Maj. Doug Gautrau, a weather officer assigned to the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron aerial reconnaissance, about his job and the data collected during their mission over the Gulf of Mexico supporting Naval Oceanography Unmanned Systems Operational Demonstration. (U.S. Navy photo by Kaley Turfitt/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/06/09/faces-of-the-fleet-247/ ltall

75th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Midway, which is considered the turning point in the Pacific Theater of World War II.

Less than seven months after the surprise attack at Pearl Harbor, an outnumbered and outgunned American fleet broke Japanese code and used the element of surprise to halt their march across the Pacific. Losses were heavy on both sides, but Japan lost the core of its aircraft carrier group, along with hundreds of aircraft and pilots.

Live coverage is scheduled to begin June 5 at 1:30 p.m. EDT from the museum ship USS Midway in San Diego.

At 2 p.m. EDT, coverage will switch to the Midway Atoll where the famed naval battle was fought.

Battle of Midway U.S. Marine Corps veterans retired Col. John F. Miniclier and retired Sgt. 1st Class Edgar R. Fox, who ultimately retired from the Army, will represent the handful of remaining survivors on the Midway Atoll. Chief Justin Culbertson – whose grandfather served in the Pacific during WWII as a crewmember aboard USS Enterprise (CV 6) which was present at the battle – will present a wreath.

Join the Battle of Midway conversation on social media using #Midway75.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/06/05/75th-anniversary-of-the-battle-of-midway/ U.S. Navy

Thoughts about Risk, Battle of Midway, Memorial Day

By Rear Adm. John Fuller
Commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific

When is it OK to take risks?

I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately – about the difference between taking calculated risks and being risk averse or, worse, taking reckless chances without thinking.

The U.S. Navy took a calculated risk when Adm. Nimitz and Adm. Spruance put the gears in motion for the Battle of Midway exactly 74 years ago.

USS Yorktown (CV 5) burning, photographed during the Battle of Midway, June 1942.

USS Yorktown (CV 5) burning, photographed during the Battle of Midway, June 1942.

 

Nimitz had faith in his intelligence team at Station Hypo. He relied on the superior work ethic and expertise of Shipyard workers who made USS Yorktown battle-ready within days. He believed in the fighting spirit and courage of his airmen, submariners and surface warriors.

And he had clear guidance, objectives and empowerment. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. E. J. King authorized Nimitz to fight to win.

Weeks before battle plans went into effect, Adm. King wired a remarkable message to Nimitz: “You are requested to read the article ‘There Is Only One Mistake: To Do Nothing’ by Charles F. Kettering in the March 29th issue of Saturday Evening Post and to see that it is brought to the attention of all your principal subordinates and other key officers.” That article urged the Navy and nation to take a no-holds-barred approach to mobilize and engage without delay.

For those of us in the military, doing nothing in the face of approaching danger is not an option. Failure to adapt, innovate, connect and communicate is a recipe for defeat – because complacency kills.

USS Yorktown (CV 5) is hit on the port side, amidships, by a Japanese Type 91 aerial torpedo during the mid-afternoon attack by planes from the carrier Hiryu, June 4, 1942. Photographed from USS Pensacola (CA 24). Yorktown is heeling to port and is seen at a different aspect than in other views taken by Pensacola, indicating that this is the second of the two torpedo hits she received.

USS Yorktown (CV 5) is hit on the port side, amidships, by a Japanese Type 91 aerial torpedo during the mid-afternoon attack by planes from the carrier Hiryu, June 4, 1942. Photographed from USS Pensacola (CA 24). Yorktown is heeling to port and is seen at a different aspect than in other views taken by Pensacola, indicating that this is the second of the two torpedo hits she received.

The brave men of the Battle of Midway risked their lives in calculated strategies and tactics that turned the tide of the entire war. Those warfighters were committed, not complacent. We must emulate their example and ethos.

So, how does the Battle of Midway apply to peacetime, Memorial Day Weekend and the summer months ahead?

In our careers, we have all been and will continue to be challenged with opportunities to intervene and do the right thing. We need people to be risk conscious, not risk averse. Remember: We did not volunteer to serve to just admire the problem.

No nice way to say it, if we know about a shipmate, wingman or battle buddy in trouble, we fail if we choose to do nothing. If we see a safety or security issue, we need to step up and speak out. Waiting to act is not an option. If we witness inappropriate behavior, we need to step in and say something. Don’t be afraid, do right.

Just like at Midway, we must play to win, not participate and hope not to lose. So, as we head into the summer and the peak of safety concerns both on the job and on leave – from now through Labor Day weekend – I hope everyone will think … Think about the high standards to which we are held. Think about the consequences of our actions. And don’t make choices without thinking.

At Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam and Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, I am proud to see our warfighters, civilian teammates and families sticking together, looking out for each other and learning and adapting as part of one big ohana (family).

In his “A Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority,” CNO Adm. John Richardson puts forth our mission, core attributes and lines of effort. The desired outcome: “A naval force that produces leaders and teams who learn and adapt to achieve maximum possible performance, and who achieve and maintain high standards to be ready for decisive operations and combat.”

The mission is clear. We are absolutely empowered to make good and smart choices; to take calculated risks for the right reasons; and to think about the consequences of our actions – or inaction.

Please stay safe in the busy summer months ahead. We need you!

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/05/27/thoughts-about-risk-battle-of-midway-memorial-day/ U.S. Navy