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Then and Now: Midway and Submarine Force

By Rear Adm. Blake Converse, Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet

“When I assumed command of the Pacific Fleet on 31 December 1941, our submarines were already operating against the enemy, the only units of the fleet that could come to grips with the Japanese for months to come. It was to the submarine force that I looked to carry the load. It is to the everlasting honor and glory of our submarine personnel that they never failed us in our days of great peril.” — Adm. Chester Nimitz, Commander, U.S. Pacific

Midway, a feature-length film scheduled for release on November 8, tells the story of the Sailors who fought so bravely in June 1942 to thwart the Japanese attack at Midway.  This retelling comes at a critical time for our Navy and our nation. Seeing the Battle of Midway on the big screen serves as a reminder of the critical importance of a strong and combat ready Navy to the security of our Nation. 

As you walk the historic submarine piers of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, you see visceral reminders of the beginning of the war and its conclusion – the memorial to USS Arizona (BB-39), which was sunk in the attack on Pearl Harbor, and the battleship USS Missouri (BB-61), on which the peace agreement was signed in Tokyo Harbor to end the war. Adm. Nimitz also walked on these piers during WWII and witnessed both the devastation of the Pearl Harbor attack and the unparalleled industriousness of our Navy and civilian work force as they recovered from that attack, rebuilt our Navy, and set sail to take the fight to the enemy at the Battle of Midway.   

In May 1942, the submarine USS Nautilus (SS 168), under the command of Lt. Cmdr. William Brockman Jr., departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for her first war patrol. Her mission was to search for the Japanese fleet sailing for Midway, and she succeeded.  USS Nautilus assisted in leading U.S. aircraft directly to the Japanese carrier Hiryu and harassing the enemy while our aircraft ravaged the Japanese Fleet. USS Nautilus survived 42 depth charges, several of her torpedoes failed to detonate, and Japanese aircraft and ships spotted her multiple times, forcing Nautilus to dive and evade multiple times. Yet, despite these challenges, the crew’s efforts were critical to the success of the battle and resulted in Brockman receiving the Navy Cross for the Battle of Midway.  

USS Nautilus (SS-168) underway, March 1933. (U.S. National Archives photo.)

U.S. submarines would go on to take the fight to the Japanese across the Pacific, wreaking havoc on the critical maritime supply routes that supported their industry, and ravaging their warships. Although submarines only made up only 2% of our entire Navy during WWII, they sank 30% of Japanese warships and 55% of Japanese merchant ships.  

But this wartime effort was not without significant sacrifice. The U.S. submarine force experienced some of the highest casualty rates of any force in WWII. A foundational part of our training as submariners is the study of this legacy of sacrifice and commitment in the face of the enemy. In this training, we make it a point to ensure that today’s submariners recognize that even though we eventually achieved victory, we were not ready for unrestricted submarine warfare when we entered the fight after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Our weapons were erratic, our tactics unrefined, and our training inadequate to the task. Yes, we eventually overcame each of these obstacles to halt the Japanese advance and set the conditions for victory in the Pacific, but there is no guarantee that the pace of future combat operations will forgive such a lack of foresight and preparation. We have to be ready to deploy and sustain high-end combat operations with little or no warning – and today we exercise that every single day in our Submarine Force. 

USS Tang (SS 306) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, Dec.2, 1943. (Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.)

Last month, we celebrated the return of USS Olympia (SSN 717), our oldest Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine, from her final deployment. Olympia completed a circumnavigation of the earth, transiting both the Panama Canal and Suez Canal, and conducting operations in the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the Pacific Ocean. Shortly after USS Olympia’s successful return, we welcomed home one of our newest Virginia class fast attack submarines, USS Illinois (SSN 786), who returned to Pearl Harbor from her first deployment. She was the first Block II Virginia-class submarine to ever deploy to the Indo-Pacific region, during which, the crew completed a full spectrum of operations to support the highest priority tasking.

USS Illinois (SSN 786) departs Groton, Connecticut to conduct sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat.)

We are in an era of great power competition. Utilizing the strength, determination, and lessons learned from those brave submariners before us, we will continue to be first to the fight, just like at Midway. We are trained, equipped, and ready to fight tonight because we have not forgotten our past.  

Editor’s Note: The four-part “Then and Now” NavyLive blog series is presented so interested audience members have an idea of what’s changed, and what has not, since the famed Battle of Midway. As the nation faces the Great Power Competition, “Midway” is an authentic representation of the Pacific in the opening months of WWII and can help people understand the value we provide today, and honors the toughness, initiative, integrity and accountability that are Sailors’ core attributes. The movie reflects the extraordinary determination and courage of those who fought in WWII, and showcases how the Navy team worked together then, as we do today.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/10/29/then-and-now-midway-and-submarine-force/ poyrazdogany

USS South Dakota (SSN 790) Commissioning

5 Things to Know Biographies Related Stories Crest

The newest Virginia-class attack submarine, USS South Dakota (SSN 790), will be commissioned at Groton, Connecticut, Feb. 2, 2019. It will be the 17th Virginia-class attack submarine to join the fleet.

As the most modern and sophisticated attack submarine in the world, the submarine can operate in both littoral and deep ocean environments and presents combatant commanders with a broad and unique range of operational capabilities. South Dakota is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, delivery of Special Operations Forces (SOF), strike warfare, irregular warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and mine warfare.

South Dakota is a part of the Virginia-class’ third, or Block III, contract, in which the Navy redesigned approximately 20 percent of the ship to reduce acquisition costs. South Dakota features a redesigned bow, which replaces 12 individual Vertical Launch System (VLS) tubes with two large-diameter Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs) each capable of launching six Tomahawk cruise missiles, among other design changes that reduced the submarines’ acquisition cost while maintaining their outstanding warfighting capabilities.

WASHINGTON (June 21, 2012) An artist rendering of the Virginia-class submarine USS South Dakota (SSN 790). (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Stan Bailey/Released)
WASHINGTON (June 21, 2012) An artist rendering of the Virginia-class submarine USS South Dakota (SSN 790). (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Stan Bailey/Released)

 

South Dakota also has special features to support Special Forces, including a reconfigurable torpedo room which can accommodate a large number of personnel and all their equipment for prolonged deployments and future off-board payloads. Also, in Virginia-class SSNs, traditional periscopes have been replaced by two photonics masts that host visible and infrared digital cameras atop telescoping arms, which are maneuvered by a video game controller. Through the extensive use of modular construction, open architecture and commercial off-the-shelf components, the Virginia class is designed to remain at the cutting edge for its entire operational life through the rapid introduction of new systems and payloads.

SSN-790, which was built at General Dynamics Electric Boat in Groton, Connecticut, will be 7,800-tons and 377 feet in length, have a beam of 34 feet and operate at more than 25 knots submerged. It is designed with a reactor plant that will not require refueling during the planned life of the boat, reducing lifecycle costs while increasing underway time.

Deanie Dempsey, wife of former Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman and retired Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, is the ship’s sponsor. She spent several decades of service in support of the Army, before becoming a champion for all of the services in her role as the chairman’s spouse. In that capacity, she has engaged in countless activities in support of military families, coached and mentored military spouses of all services, participated in dozens of private and charitable organizations, traveled the world representing the United States military, hosted visits to the United States by the spouses of foreign military leaders, and coordinated the family support activities of the White House and Department of Defense.

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GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 14, 2017) Ship’s sponsor Deanie Dempsey christens the Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN 790) at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 14, 2017) Ship’s sponsor Deanie Dempsey christens the Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN 790) at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 14, 2017) The Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN 790) was christened at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 14, 2017) The Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN 790) was christened at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 14, 2017) The Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN 790) was christened at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 14, 2017) The Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN 790) was christened at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
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The submarine South Dakota will be the fourth planned, and third commissioned U.S. Navy vessel to bear the South Dakota name.

The first USS South Dakota (ACR9/CA 9) was a Pennsylvania-class armored cruiser that launched in 1904. Assigned to the Armored Cruiser Squadron, Pacific Fleet, South Dakota cruised off the west coast of the United States through August 1908. It was then sent on a cruise to Samoa and later operated in Central and South American waters. The armored cruiser returned home in 1912 and was placed in reserve at Puget Sound Navy Yard.

An undated photo of USS South Dakota (CA 9). (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
An undated photo of USS South Dakota (CA 9). (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

 

The South Dakota-class American battleships were authorized March 4, 1917, and laid down in 1920 but were never completed. They would have been the last dreadnoughts in the Naval Act of 1916 to be commissioned had the Washington Naval Treaty not caused their cancellation.

The second USS South Dakota (BB 57) was commissioned March 1942 and assigned to Task Force 16 centered on the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV 6). South Dakota conducted blockade operations against Japanese forces approaching Guadalcanal, where they engaged Japanese carrier forces in the Battle of Santa Cruz. BB-57 saw action in the Battle of Savo Island, Battle of Philippine Sea, Okinawa, Iwo Jima, and other Japanese strongholds earning 13 battle stars.

USS South Dakota (BB 57) off the Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, Aug. 20. 1943. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
USS South Dakota (BB 57) off the Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, Aug. 20. 1943. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

 

For media interested in attending the media day on Jan. 31 and/or commissioning ceremony on Feb. 2, contact the Submarine Force Atlantic Public Affairs office at 757-836-1650, or email USFF_COMSUBLANT_NFLT_PAO@navy.mil by noon on Jan. 26.

No live trucks or vans will be authorized.

Media who are not able to attend the media day or ceremony may request remote interviews with South Dakota leadership and crew.

Five Things to Know About USS South Dakota (SSN 790)

  1. Namesake: USS South Dakota is named after the 40th state added to the Union.
    The submarine is the third ship to be christened “South Dakota.” The first USS South Dakota (ACR9/CA 9) was launched in 1904. Assigned to the Armored Cruiser Squadron, Pacific Fleet, South Dakota cruised off the west coast of the United States through August 1908. It was then sent on a cruise to Samoa and later operated in Central and South American waters. It returned home in 1912 and was placed in reserve at Puget Sound Navy Yard. The second USS South Dakota (BB 57) was commissioned March 1942 and assigned to Task Force 16 centered on the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV 6). South Dakota conducted blockade operations against Japanese forces approaching Guadalcanal, where they engaged Japanese carrier forces in the Battle of Santa Cruz. BB-57 saw action in the Battle of Savo Island, Battle of Philippine Sea, Okinawa, Iwo Jima, and other Japanese strongholds earning 13 battle stars.
  2. Sponsor: Deanie Dempsey, wife of former Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman and retired Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, is the ship’s sponsor and will be in attendance for the commissioning.
    Deanie spent several decades of service in support of the Army, before becoming a champion for all of the services in her role as the chairman’s spouse. In that capacity, she has engaged in countless activities in support of military families, coached and mentored military spouses of all services, participated in dozens of private and charitable organizations, traveled the world representing the United States military, hosted visits to the United States by the spouses of foreign military leaders, and coordinated the family support activities of the White House and Department of Defense.
  3. Size/Endurance: The submarine is 377 feet long, has a 34-foot beam, and will be able to dive to depths greater than 800 feet and operate at speeds in excess of 25 knots submerged while displacing approximately 7,800 tons submerged. It will operate for over 30 years without ever refueling.
  4. Capability:  South Dakota is the seventh Block III submarine of the Virginia-class.
    The Virginia class has been improved to enhance littoral operations. The class has special features to support Special Operations Forces, including a reconfigurable torpedo room which can accommodate a large number of SOF and all their equipment for prolonged deployments and future off-board payloads. The class also has a large lock-in/lock-out chamber for divers. Traditional periscopes have been replaced by two photonics masts that host visible and infrared digital cameras atop telescoping arms. The Block III submarines have replaced the 12 individual Vertical Launch System (VLS) tubes with two 87-inch Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching six Tomahawk cruise missiles. The VPTs simplify construction, reduce acquisition costs, and provide for more payload flexibility than the smaller VLS tubes due to their added volume.
  5. Missions: South Dakota is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface warfare; delivery of special operations forces; strike warfare; irregular warfare; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and mine warfare.

Related Stories

Biographies

Commanding Officer

Commanding Officer

Cmdr. Craig LittyCmdr. Craig Litty, a native of House Springs, Missouri, enlisted in the Navy in 1992 and served as a hospital corpsman until his selection to the Seaman to Admiral Program in 1999. He graduated in 2001 from the University of North Florida with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and was commissioned upon completion of Officer Candidate School the same year.

After completing Nuclear Power Training and the Submarine Officer Basic Course in February 2003, Litty served onboard USS San Francisco (SSN 711) from March 2003 through June 2005, where he completed one Guam mission cycle as the chemistry and radiological controls assistant and damage control assistant. From April 2007 through September 2009, he served as engineer officer on USS Buffalo (SSN 715). During his tour, Buffalo completed four Guam mission cycles and earned the Battle Efficiency “E” award for 2008. Following completion of Submarine Command Course in August 2013, he served as executive officer on Uss New Mexico (SSN 779). While serving as executive officer, New Mexico completed one Arctic deployment and one European Command deployment and was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation.

Litty served ashore as flag aide to Commander, Naval Forces Marianas, and engineer officer for Submarine Squadron 15. In 2013, he graduated with distinction from the U.S Naval War College. Most recently, he served as the systems employment development department head at the Undersea Warfighting Development Center Tactical Analysis Group.

Personal awards include the Meritorious Service Medal (three awards), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (five awards), Army Commendation Medal and the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (three awards).

Litty is married with two children.

Executive Officer

Executive Officer

Lt. Cmdr. Scotty MurphyLt. Cmdr. Scotty Murphy is from Blanchard, Oklahoma, and is a 2004 graduate of Missouri-Rolla. He has a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering with a minor in Mathematics.

After earning his degree from University of Missouri-Rolla, he earned his commission in November 2004 through Officer Candidate School in Pensacola, Florida, before beginning the nuclear power training pipeline.

After completing nuclear training and basic officer training, he reported onboard USS Montepier (SSN 765) in Norfolk, Virginia, where he served as EA, CRA, and assistant engineer. During his tour, Montpelier supported two submarine command courses, deployed to the U.S. Central Command area of operations in 2008, and earned two Battle E’s. Following his junior officer tour, he reported to shore duty at PERS-42 in Millington, Tennessee, serving for two years as a submarine junior officer detailer. Following his tour, he earned his Master’s degree in National Strategy and Policy from the Naval War College.

Following completion of Submarine Officer Advanced Course, Murphy reported to USS Chicago (SSN 721) in Guam to serve as weapons officer. During his tour, Chicago completed seven mission cycles and was awarded the Battle E, Weapons White “W” and the Meritorious Unit Citation. Following his tour, he reported to COMSIXTHFLEET/CTF-69 serving as the current operations officer for the European Command area of responsibility.

Murphy serves as the executive officer of USS South Dakota.

His personal decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal (six awards) and the Navy/Marine Corps Achievement Medal.

Murphy is married with three children.

Chief of the Boat

Chief of the Boat

Senior Chief HMCS(SS/FMF) GoulasSenior Chief HMCS (SS/FMF) Adam Goulas was born and raised in Mauriceville, Texas. After graduating from Little Cypress-Mauriceville High School, he enlisted in the Navy in September 1993 and attended basic training at Recruit Training Command, San Diego, California.

His follow on training includes Hospital Corpsman “A” school, Field Medical Service “C” school (NEC 8404), Surgical Technologist “C” school (NEC 8483), and Submarine Independent Duty Corpsman “C” school (NEC 8402).

He graduated from the Senior Enlisted Academy, Class 192 (Gold).

His prior duty assignments include NAVHOSP Twenty-Nine Palms, California, from March 1994 to August 1995; 1st Marine Division, 3rd Marines, 5th Battalion from August 1995 to August 1998; Naval Nuclear Power Training Command, Charleston, South Carolina, from August 1998 to November 2001; Fleet Surgical Team, Portsmouth, Virginia, from December 2001 to December 2004; USS Boise (SSN 764) from March 2006 to August 2009; Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia, from September 2009 to October 2012; USS New Mexico (SSN 779) from November 2012 to December 2015; and a faculty advisor at the Navy’s Senior Enlisted Academy Newport, Rhode Island, from December 2015 to November 2018.

His current duty assignment is Chief of the Boat PCU South Dakota (SSN 790).

Senior Chief Goulas is qualified to wear the Submarine Warfare (SS) insignia; he is also qualified Fleet Marine Force (FMF). His personal awards include the Navy Commendation Medal (five awards), the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (four awards), the Navy Good Conduct Medal (eight awards) and various unit, service, and campaign ribbons/medals.

Sponsor

Sponsor

Deanie DempseyDeanie Dempsey was born and raised in New York. After graduating with a degree in education from Le Moyne University in Syracuse, New York, she married her high school sweetheart, now-retired U.S. Army Gen. Martin Dempsey. As a military spouse, she lived in seven states, Germany for 11 years, and Saudi Arabia for two years. Along the way, and while raising her family, she earned her master’s degree from the University of Colorado. She has three children. Her husband commissioned all three children in the Army, and one remains on active duty.

After several decades of service in support of the Army, Deanie became a champion for all of the services when Gen. Dempsey was named Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 2011. Over the next four years, she engaged in countless activities in support of military families, coached and mentored military spouses of all services, participated in dozens of private and charitable organizations, traveled the world representing the U.S. military, hosted visits to the United States by the spouses of foreign military leaders, and coordinated family support activities for the White House and Department of Defense.

Deanie Dempsey has been – and remains – a powerful advocate for the members of the armed forces and the selfless family members who support them.

Since her husband retired in October 2015, Deanie has remained active with military support organizations including the Bob Woodruff Foundation and TAPS (Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors).

She is honored and humbled to serve as sponsor of the submarine South Dakota.

Boat’s Crest

USS South Dakota's crest

The boat’s crest pays homage to its namesake and ships bearing the name South Dakota. In the center, sits Mount Rushmore National Memorial, the state’s most iconic destination. Surrounding Mount Rushmore are three coyotes, the state animal of South Dakota and a symbol used by many Native American tribes. Pheasant feathers and a rattlesnake tail hang from the side representing the state bird of South Dakota, and the silent and deadly stealth of SSN-790. Above Mount Rushmore, the sun shape pays homage to South Dakota’s state flag, with the 13 stars representing the battle stars awarded to BB-57 during World War II. Atop the crest sit two submarine dolphins, one silver and one gold. The silver dolphin represents the enlisted crew with the gold representing officers.

The boat’s motto is written in Latin “Subter Mare Dominamur” – “Under the sea we rule.”

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/01/02/uss-south-dakota-ssn-790-commissioning/ U.S. Navy

USS South Dakota (SSN 790) Commissioning

5 Things to Know Biographies Related Stories Crest

The newest Virginia-class attack submarine, USS South Dakota (SSN 790), will be commissioned at Groton, Connecticut, Feb. 2, 2019. It will be the 17th Virginia-class attack submarine to join the fleet.

As the most modern and sophisticated attack submarine in the world, the submarine can operate in both littoral and deep ocean environments and presents combatant commanders with a broad and unique range of operational capabilities. South Dakota is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, delivery of Special Operations Forces (SOF), strike warfare, irregular warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and mine warfare.

South Dakota is a part of the Virginia-class’ third, or Block III, contract, in which the Navy redesigned approximately 20 percent of the ship to reduce acquisition costs. South Dakota features a redesigned bow, which replaces 12 individual Vertical Launch System (VLS) tubes with two large-diameter Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs) each capable of launching six Tomahawk cruise missiles, among other design changes that reduced the submarines’ acquisition cost while maintaining their outstanding warfighting capabilities.

WASHINGTON (June 21, 2012) An artist rendering of the Virginia-class submarine USS South Dakota (SSN 790). (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Stan Bailey/Released)
WASHINGTON (June 21, 2012) An artist rendering of the Virginia-class submarine USS South Dakota (SSN 790). (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Stan Bailey/Released)

 

South Dakota also has special features to support Special Forces, including a reconfigurable torpedo room which can accommodate a large number of personnel and all their equipment for prolonged deployments and future off-board payloads. Also, in Virginia-class SSNs, traditional periscopes have been replaced by two photonics masts that host visible and infrared digital cameras atop telescoping arms, which are maneuvered by a video game controller. Through the extensive use of modular construction, open architecture and commercial off-the-shelf components, the Virginia class is designed to remain at the cutting edge for its entire operational life through the rapid introduction of new systems and payloads.

SSN-790, which was built at General Dynamics Electric Boat in Groton, Connecticut, will be 7,800-tons and 377 feet in length, have a beam of 34 feet and operate at more than 25 knots submerged. It is designed with a reactor plant that will not require refueling during the planned life of the boat, reducing lifecycle costs while increasing underway time.

Deanie Dempsey, wife of former Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman and retired Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, is the ship’s sponsor. She spent several decades of service in support of the Army, before becoming a champion for all of the services in her role as the chairman’s spouse. In that capacity, she has engaged in countless activities in support of military families, coached and mentored military spouses of all services, participated in dozens of private and charitable organizations, traveled the world representing the United States military, hosted visits to the United States by the spouses of foreign military leaders, and coordinated the family support activities of the White House and Department of Defense.

Next Prev
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 14, 2017) Ship’s sponsor Deanie Dempsey christens the Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN 790) at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 14, 2017) Ship’s sponsor Deanie Dempsey christens the Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN 790) at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 14, 2017) The Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN 790) was christened at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 14, 2017) The Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN 790) was christened at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 14, 2017) The Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN 790) was christened at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 14, 2017) The Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN 790) was christened at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
Next Prev

The submarine South Dakota will be the fourth planned, and third commissioned U.S. Navy vessel to bear the South Dakota name.

The first USS South Dakota (ACR9/CA 9) was a Pennsylvania-class armored cruiser that launched in 1904. Assigned to the Armored Cruiser Squadron, Pacific Fleet, South Dakota cruised off the west coast of the United States through August 1908. It was then sent on a cruise to Samoa and later operated in Central and South American waters. The armored cruiser returned home in 1912 and was placed in reserve at Puget Sound Navy Yard.

An undated photo of USS South Dakota (CA 9). (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
An undated photo of USS South Dakota (CA 9). (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

 

The South Dakota-class American battleships were authorized March 4, 1917, and laid down in 1920 but were never completed. They would have been the last dreadnoughts in the Naval Act of 1916 to be commissioned had the Washington Naval Treaty not caused their cancellation.

The second USS South Dakota (BB 57) was commissioned March 1942 and assigned to Task Force 16 centered on the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV 6). South Dakota conducted blockade operations against Japanese forces approaching Guadalcanal, where they engaged Japanese carrier forces in the Battle of Santa Cruz. BB-57 saw action in the Battle of Savo Island, Battle of Philippine Sea, Okinawa, Iwo Jima, and other Japanese strongholds earning 13 battle stars.

USS South Dakota (BB 57) off the Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, Aug. 20. 1943. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
USS South Dakota (BB 57) off the Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, Aug. 20. 1943. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

 

For media interested in attending the media day on Jan. 31 and/or commissioning ceremony on Feb. 2, contact the Submarine Force Atlantic Public Affairs office at 757-836-1650, or email USFF_COMSUBLANT_NFLT_PAO@navy.mil by noon on Jan. 26.

No live trucks or vans will be authorized.

Media who are not able to attend the media day or ceremony may request remote interviews with South Dakota leadership and crew.

Five Things to Know About USS South Dakota (SSN 790)

  1. Namesake: USS South Dakota is named after the 40th state added to the Union.
    The submarine is the third ship to be christened “South Dakota.” The first USS South Dakota (ACR9/CA 9) was launched in 1904. Assigned to the Armored Cruiser Squadron, Pacific Fleet, South Dakota cruised off the west coast of the United States through August 1908. It was then sent on a cruise to Samoa and later operated in Central and South American waters. It returned home in 1912 and was placed in reserve at Puget Sound Navy Yard. The second USS South Dakota (BB 57) was commissioned March 1942 and assigned to Task Force 16 centered on the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV 6). South Dakota conducted blockade operations against Japanese forces approaching Guadalcanal, where they engaged Japanese carrier forces in the Battle of Santa Cruz. BB-57 saw action in the Battle of Savo Island, Battle of Philippine Sea, Okinawa, Iwo Jima, and other Japanese strongholds earning 13 battle stars.
  2. Sponsor: Deanie Dempsey, wife of former Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman and retired Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, is the ship’s sponsor and will be in attendance for the commissioning.
    Deanie spent several decades of service in support of the Army, before becoming a champion for all of the services in her role as the chairman’s spouse. In that capacity, she has engaged in countless activities in support of military families, coached and mentored military spouses of all services, participated in dozens of private and charitable organizations, traveled the world representing the United States military, hosted visits to the United States by the spouses of foreign military leaders, and coordinated the family support activities of the White House and Department of Defense.
  3. Size/Endurance: The submarine is 377 feet long, has a 34-foot beam, and will be able to dive to depths greater than 800 feet and operate at speeds in excess of 25 knots submerged while displacing approximately 7,800 tons submerged. It will operate for over 30 years without ever refueling.
  4. Capability:  South Dakota is the seventh Block III submarine of the Virginia-class.
    The Virginia class has been improved to enhance littoral operations. The class has special features to support Special Operations Forces, including a reconfigurable torpedo room which can accommodate a large number of SOF and all their equipment for prolonged deployments and future off-board payloads. The class also has a large lock-in/lock-out chamber for divers. Traditional periscopes have been replaced by two photonics masts that host visible and infrared digital cameras atop telescoping arms. The Block III submarines have replaced the 12 individual Vertical Launch System (VLS) tubes with two 87-inch Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching six Tomahawk cruise missiles. The VPTs simplify construction, reduce acquisition costs, and provide for more payload flexibility than the smaller VLS tubes due to their added volume.
  5. Missions: South Dakota is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface warfare; delivery of special operations forces; strike warfare; irregular warfare; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and mine warfare.

Related Stories

Biographies

Commanding Officer

Commanding Officer

Cmdr. Craig LittyCmdr. Craig Litty, a native of House Springs, Missouri, enlisted in the Navy in 1992 and served as a hospital corpsman until his selection to the Seaman to Admiral Program in 1999. He graduated in 2001 from the University of North Florida with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and was commissioned upon completion of Officer Candidate School the same year.

After completing Nuclear Power Training and the Submarine Officer Basic Course in February 2003, Litty served onboard USS San Francisco (SSN 711) from March 2003 through June 2005, where he completed one Guam mission cycle as the chemistry and radiological controls assistant and damage control assistant. From April 2007 through September 2009, he served as engineer officer on USS Buffalo (SSN 715). During his tour, Buffalo completed four Guam mission cycles and earned the Battle Efficiency “E” award for 2008. Following completion of Submarine Command Course in August 2013, he served as executive officer on Uss New Mexico (SSN 779). While serving as executive officer, New Mexico completed one Arctic deployment and one European Command deployment and was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation.

Litty served ashore as flag aide to Commander, Naval Forces Marianas, and engineer officer for Submarine Squadron 15. In 2013, he graduated with distinction from the U.S Naval War College. Most recently, he served as the systems employment development department head at the Undersea Warfighting Development Center Tactical Analysis Group.

Personal awards include the Meritorious Service Medal (three awards), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (five awards), Army Commendation Medal and the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (three awards).

Litty is married with two children.

Executive Officer

Executive Officer

Lt. Cmdr. Scotty MurphyLt. Cmdr. Scotty Murphy is from Blanchard, Oklahoma, and is a 2004 graduate of Missouri-Rolla. He has a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering with a minor in Mathematics.

After earning his degree from University of Missouri-Rolla, he earned his commission in November 2004 through Officer Candidate School in Pensacola, Florida, before beginning the nuclear power training pipeline.

After completing nuclear training and basic officer training, he reported onboard USS Montepier (SSN 765) in Norfolk, Virginia, where he served as EA, CRA, and assistant engineer. During his tour, Montpelier supported two submarine command courses, deployed to the U.S. Central Command area of operations in 2008, and earned two Battle E’s. Following his junior officer tour, he reported to shore duty at PERS-42 in Millington, Tennessee, serving for two years as a submarine junior officer detailer. Following his tour, he earned his Master’s degree in National Strategy and Policy from the Naval War College.

Following completion of Submarine Officer Advanced Course, Murphy reported to USS Chicago (SSN 721) in Guam to serve as weapons officer. During his tour, Chicago completed seven mission cycles and was awarded the Battle E, Weapons White “W” and the Meritorious Unit Citation. Following his tour, he reported to COMSIXTHFLEET/CTF-69 serving as the current operations officer for the European Command area of responsibility.

Murphy serves as the executive officer of USS South Dakota.

His personal decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal (six awards) and the Navy/Marine Corps Achievement Medal.

Murphy is married with three children.

Chief of the Boat

Chief of the Boat

Senior Chief HMCS(SS/FMF) GoulasSenior Chief HMCS (SS/FMF) Adam Goulas was born and raised in Mauriceville, Texas. After graduating from Little Cypress-Mauriceville High School, he enlisted in the Navy in September 1993 and attended basic training at Recruit Training Command, San Diego, California.

His follow on training includes Hospital Corpsman “A” school, Field Medical Service “C” school (NEC 8404), Surgical Technologist “C” school (NEC 8483), and Submarine Independent Duty Corpsman “C” school (NEC 8402).

He graduated from the Senior Enlisted Academy, Class 192 (Gold).

His prior duty assignments include NAVHOSP Twenty-Nine Palms, California, from March 1994 to August 1995; 1st Marine Division, 3rd Marines, 5th Battalion from August 1995 to August 1998; Naval Nuclear Power Training Command, Charleston, South Carolina, from August 1998 to November 2001; Fleet Surgical Team, Portsmouth, Virginia, from December 2001 to December 2004; USS Boise (SSN 764) from March 2006 to August 2009; Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia, from September 2009 to October 2012; USS New Mexico (SSN 779) from November 2012 to December 2015; and a faculty advisor at the Navy’s Senior Enlisted Academy Newport, Rhode Island, from December 2015 to November 2018.

His current duty assignment is Chief of the Boat PCU South Dakota (SSN 790).

Senior Chief Goulas is qualified to wear the Submarine Warfare (SS) insignia; he is also qualified Fleet Marine Force (FMF). His personal awards include the Navy Commendation Medal (five awards), the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (four awards), the Navy Good Conduct Medal (eight awards) and various unit, service, and campaign ribbons/medals.

Sponsor

Sponsor

Deanie DempseyDeanie Dempsey was born and raised in New York. After graduating with a degree in education from Le Moyne University in Syracuse, New York, she married her high school sweetheart, now-retired U.S. Army Gen. Martin Dempsey. As a military spouse, she lived in seven states, Germany for 11 years, and Saudi Arabia for two years. Along the way, and while raising her family, she earned her master’s degree from the University of Colorado. She has three children. Her husband commissioned all three children in the Army, and one remains on active duty.

After several decades of service in support of the Army, Deanie became a champion for all of the services when Gen. Dempsey was named Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 2011. Over the next four years, she engaged in countless activities in support of military families, coached and mentored military spouses of all services, participated in dozens of private and charitable organizations, traveled the world representing the U.S. military, hosted visits to the United States by the spouses of foreign military leaders, and coordinated family support activities for the White House and Department of Defense.

Deanie Dempsey has been – and remains – a powerful advocate for the members of the armed forces and the selfless family members who support them.

Since her husband retired in October 2015, Deanie has remained active with military support organizations including the Bob Woodruff Foundation and TAPS (Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors).

She is honored and humbled to serve as sponsor of the submarine South Dakota.

Boat’s Crest

USS South Dakota's crest

The boat’s crest pays homage to its namesake and ships bearing the name South Dakota. In the center, sits Mount Rushmore National Memorial, the state’s most iconic destination. Surrounding Mount Rushmore are three coyotes, the state animal of South Dakota and a symbol used by many Native American tribes. Pheasant feathers and a rattlesnake tail hang from the side representing the state bird of South Dakota, and the silent and deadly stealth of SSN-790. Above Mount Rushmore, the sun shape pays homage to South Dakota’s state flag, with the 13 stars representing the battle stars awarded to BB-57 during World War II. Atop the crest sit two submarine dolphins, one silver and one gold. The silver dolphin represents the enlisted crew with the gold representing officers.

The boat’s motto is written in Latin “Subter Mare Dominamur” – “Under the sea we rule.”

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/01/02/uss-south-dakota-ssn-790-commissioning/ U.S. Navy

Five Things to Know About USS Colorado

The newest Virginia-class attack submarine, USS Colorado (SSN 788), will be commissioned at Naval Submarine Base New London, March 17, 2018. It will be the 15th Virginia-class attack submarine to join the fleet when it is commissioned, which you can watch here on the Navy Live blog.

Below are five things that you should know about the Navy’s newest submarine.

  1. The Virginia-class, fast-attack submarine, USS Colorado (SSN 788) is equipped with non-penetrating digital camera periscopes called Photonics Masts. Normally, submarines are built with two classic style periscopes. The Technical Insertion called TI-14, and Advanced Processing Build APB-13, allows the Photonics Masts the option to be controlled with wired video game controllers. Though others have tested prototypes, Colorado is the first submarine operating from the start with the gaming controllers.
    ATLANTIC OCEAN (Jan. 12, 2018) Lt. Anthony Matus uses an XBox controller to maneuver the photonic mast aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit Colorado (SSN 788). Colorado is the 15th Virginia-class attack submarine and is scheduled to be commissioned March 17, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeffrey M. Richardson/Released)
    ATLANTIC OCEAN (Jan. 12, 2018) Lt. Anthony Matus uses an XBox controller to maneuver the photonic mast aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit Colorado (SSN 788). Colorado is the 15th Virginia-class attack submarine and is scheduled to be commissioned March 17, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeffrey M. Richardson/Released)
  2. USS Colorado’s (SSN 788) crest was designed during a contest held by Colorado’s Commissioning Committee and USS Colorado. Many submissions came in, and the winning design selected was submitted by Ens. Michael Nielson, who, at the time, was a student at the Navy’s Nuclear Power Training Unit in Ballston Spa, New York. After contacting Nielson to let him know that his design was selected, USS Colorado found out that he was actually from Arvada, Colorado. Two days after finding out he won the design contest, he received orders to report to USS Colorado.
    USS Colorado's crest
    USS Colorado’s crest
  3. USS Colorado (SSN 788) is the third ship to bear the name of our 38th state. The first Colorado, named after the Colorado River, was a steam screw frigate that launched in 1856 and commissioned in 1858. Her service included serving as flagship to Commodore William Marvine while he ran a blockage squadron during the Civil War. During the Battle of Fort Fisher in Wilmington, North Carolina, she was pivotal in the fort’s capture. The battle was heralded by the New York Times as “The Most Beautiful Duel of the War.” The first Colorado was decommissioned June 8, 1876.
    USS Colorado, circa 1856-1885. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
    USS Colorado, circa 1856-1885. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

    The second ship was a Pennsylvania-class cruiser. She was commissioned in 1903 and joined the Atlantic Fleet in 1905. She was ordered to the Asiatic Station where she saw service in China and Japan as well as the Hawaiian Islands and Mexico. In 1916, she was re-commissioned under the name USS Pueblo so the name Colorado would be free to use on the Colorado-class battleship. She was decommissioned in 1927.

    An undated photo of USS Colorado (BB 45), circa 1906. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
    An undated photo of USS Colorado (BB 45), circa 1906. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

    The third USS Colorado (BB 45) was the lead ship in the Colorado-class of battleships and she served our Navy from 1923 to 1947. Battleship Colorado engaged in combat in the Pacific, supporting landings on Tarawa, Kwajalein, Eniwetok, Saipan, Guam and Tinian. During the Battle of Tinian, she was hit 22 times by shore batteries but stayed in the fight. Colorado continued to serve bravely in Leyte, Mindoro, Luzon and Okinawa. In the Philippines, on November 27, 1944, she was hit by two kamikazes which caused moderate damage. She earned seven battle stars for her service in the Pacific and continued to serve valiantly throughout the war. When the unconditional surrender was signed aboard USS Missouri, Colorado stood guard proudly in Tokyo Bay. She was decommissioned on January 7, 1947.

    An undated photo of USS Colorado (BB 45). (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
    An undated photo of USS Colorado (BB 45). (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

     

  4. USS Colorado galley is named “Rocky Mountain Grille.” This name was selected after a naming contest at the command. The crew’s mess and the serving line in front of the galley are adorned with landscape photographs by John Fielder, a photographer in Colorado. The photos were given and installed by USS Colorado’s Commissioning Committee. The photographs remind Colorado Sailors of the great people of the beautiful state they represent.
    ATLANTIC OCEAN (Jan. 10, 2018) Culinary Specialist (Submarines) Seaman Carlos Sifontes poses for a photo while unloading food from the dry provisions store room aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Colorado (SSN 788). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeffrey M. Richardson/Released)
    ATLANTIC OCEAN (Jan. 10, 2018) Culinary Specialist (Submarines) Seaman Carlos Sifontes poses for a photo while unloading food from the dry provisions store room aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Colorado (SSN 788). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeffrey M. Richardson/Released)
  5. A Colorado Sailor, Sonar Technician (Submarine) 3rd Class Brayden Kane, was awarded his Submarine Warfare Insignia, referred to as “dolphins,” by retired Lt. Col. Andy Palenchar at the Colorado State Capitol building. Palenchar enlisted in the Navy and qualified aboard USS Finback (SS 320) in 1943. While USS Finback was deployed, serving “lifeguard duty,” rescuing downed Navy pilots, Palenchar was the one who hoisted a pilot named Lt. j.g. George H.W. Bush aboard after the future president was shot down over the Pacific. After World War II, Palenchar joined the Army and retired as a lieutenant colonel in 1978.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/03/13/five-things-to-know-about-uss-colorado/ U.S. Navy

Five Things to Know About USS Colorado

The newest Virginia-class attack submarine, USS Colorado (SSN 788), will be commissioned at Naval Submarine Base New London, March 17, 2018. It will be the 15th Virginia-class attack submarine to join the fleet when it is commissioned, which you can watch here on the Navy Live blog.

Below are five things that you should know about the Navy’s newest submarine.

  1. The Virginia-class, fast-attack submarine, USS Colorado (SSN 788) is equipped with non-penetrating digital camera periscopes called Photonics Masts. Normally, submarines are built with two classic style periscopes. The Technical Insertion called TI-14, and Advanced Processing Build APB-13, allows the Photonics Masts the option to be controlled with wired video game controllers. Though others have tested prototypes, Colorado is the first submarine operating from the start with the gaming controllers.
    ATLANTIC OCEAN (Jan. 12, 2018) Lt. Anthony Matus uses an XBox controller to maneuver the photonic mast aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit Colorado (SSN 788). Colorado is the 15th Virginia-class attack submarine and is scheduled to be commissioned March 17, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeffrey M. Richardson/Released)
    ATLANTIC OCEAN (Jan. 12, 2018) Lt. Anthony Matus uses an XBox controller to maneuver the photonic mast aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit Colorado (SSN 788). Colorado is the 15th Virginia-class attack submarine and is scheduled to be commissioned March 17, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeffrey M. Richardson/Released)
  2. USS Colorado’s (SSN 788) crest was designed during a contest held by Colorado’s Commissioning Committee and USS Colorado. Many submissions came in, and the winning design selected was submitted by Ens. Michael Nielson, who, at the time, was a student at the Navy’s Nuclear Power Training Unit in Ballston Spa, New York. After contacting Nielson to let him know that his design was selected, USS Colorado found out that he was actually from Arvada, Colorado. Two days after finding out he won the design contest, he received orders to report to USS Colorado.
    USS Colorado's crest
    USS Colorado’s crest
  3. USS Colorado (SSN 788) is the third ship to bear the name of our 38th state. The first Colorado, named after the Colorado River, was a steam screw frigate that launched in 1856 and commissioned in 1858. Her service included serving as flagship to Commodore William Marvine while he ran a blockage squadron during the Civil War. During the Battle of Fort Fisher in Wilmington, North Carolina, she was pivotal in the fort’s capture. The battle was heralded by the New York Times as “The Most Beautiful Duel of the War.” The first Colorado was decommissioned June 8, 1876.
    USS Colorado, circa 1856-1885. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
    USS Colorado, circa 1856-1885. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

    The second ship was a Pennsylvania-class cruiser. She was commissioned in 1903 and joined the Atlantic Fleet in 1905. She was ordered to the Asiatic Station where she saw service in China and Japan as well as the Hawaiian Islands and Mexico. In 1916, she was re-commissioned under the name USS Pueblo so the name Colorado would be free to use on the Colorado-class battleship. She was decommissioned in 1927.

    An undated photo of USS Colorado (BB 45), circa 1906. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
    An undated photo of USS Colorado (BB 45), circa 1906. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

    The third USS Colorado (BB 45) was the lead ship in the Colorado-class of battleships and she served our Navy from 1923 to 1947. Battleship Colorado engaged in combat in the Pacific, supporting landings on Tarawa, Kwajalein, Eniwetok, Saipan, Guam and Tinian. During the Battle of Tinian, she was hit 22 times by shore batteries but stayed in the fight. Colorado continued to serve bravely in Leyte, Mindoro, Luzon and Okinawa. In the Philippines, on November 27, 1944, she was hit by two kamikazes which caused moderate damage. She earned seven battle stars for her service in the Pacific and continued to serve valiantly throughout the war. When the unconditional surrender was signed aboard USS Missouri, Colorado stood guard proudly in Tokyo Bay. She was decommissioned on January 7, 1947.

    An undated photo of USS Colorado (BB 45). (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
    An undated photo of USS Colorado (BB 45). (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

     

  4. USS Colorado galley is named “Rocky Mountain Grille.” This name was selected after a naming contest at the command. The crew’s mess and the serving line in front of the galley are adorned with landscape photographs by John Fielder, a photographer in Colorado. The photos were given and installed by USS Colorado’s Commissioning Committee. The photographs remind Colorado Sailors of the great people of the beautiful state they represent.
    ATLANTIC OCEAN (Jan. 10, 2018) Culinary Specialist (Submarines) Seaman Carlos Sifontes poses for a photo while unloading food from the dry provisions store room aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Colorado (SSN 788). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeffrey M. Richardson/Released)
    ATLANTIC OCEAN (Jan. 10, 2018) Culinary Specialist (Submarines) Seaman Carlos Sifontes poses for a photo while unloading food from the dry provisions store room aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Colorado (SSN 788). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeffrey M. Richardson/Released)
  5. A Colorado Sailor, Sonar Technician (Submarine) 3rd Class Brayden Kane, was awarded his Submarine Warfare Insignia, referred to as “dolphins,” by retired Lt. Col. Andy Palenchar at the Colorado State Capitol building. Palenchar enlisted in the Navy and qualified aboard USS Finback (SS 320) in 1943. While USS Finback was deployed, serving “lifeguard duty,” rescuing downed Navy pilots, Palenchar was the one who hoisted a pilot named Lt. j.g. George H.W. Bush aboard after the future president was shot down over the Pacific. After World War II, Palenchar joined the Army and retired as a lieutenant colonel in 1978.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/03/13/five-things-to-know-about-uss-colorado/ U.S. Navy

ICEX 2018: Proving Ground for Submarine Arctic Operability and Warfighting

Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018 is underway in the Arctic Ocean.

The five-week biennial exercise allows us to assess our operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience there, advance understanding of the Arctic environment and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations.

During ICEX 2018, the Seawolf-class fast attack submarine USS Connecticut (SSN 22) from Bangor, Washington, the Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine USS Hartford (SSN 768) from Groton, Connecticut, and the Royal Navy Trafalgar-class submarine HMS Trenchant (S91) will conduct multiple arctic transits, a North Pole surfacing, scientific data collection and other training evolutions during their time in the region.

Read more on Navy.mil

Learn more in the ICEX 2018 briefing book.

For updates, follow this page throughout ICEX 2018 for stories, photos and videos.

ICE CAMP SKATE (March 5, 2018) A Royal Canadian DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft delivering supplies and personnel flies over Ice Camp Skate during camp build during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. ICEX 2018 is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman 1st Class Kelly Willett/Released)
ICE CAMP SKATE (March 5, 2018) A Royal Canadian DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft delivering supplies and personnel flies over Ice Camp Skate during camp build during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. ICEX 2018 is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman 1st Class Kelly Willett/Released)
ICE CAMP SKATE (March 5, 2018) Andy Mahoney, University of Alaska Fairbanks research associate processor prepares supplies for transport to Ice Camp Skate during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. ICEX 2018 is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman 1st Class Kelly Willett/Released)
ICE CAMP SKATE (March 5, 2018) Andy Mahoney, University of Alaska Fairbanks research associate processor prepares supplies for transport to Ice Camp Skate during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. ICEX 2018 is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman 1st Class Kelly Willett/Released)
ICE CAMP SKATE (March 5, 2018) A Royal Canadian DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft delivering supplies and personnel flies over an ice floe during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. ICEX 2018 is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman 1st Class Kelly Willett/Released)
ICE CAMP SKATE (March 5, 2018) A Royal Canadian DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft delivering supplies and personnel flies over an ice floe during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. ICEX 2018 is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman 1st Class Kelly Willett/Released)
ICE CAMP SKATE (March 5, 2018) A Royal Canadian DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft flies over the Beaufort Sea to deliver supplies and personnel to Ice Camp Skate during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. ICEX 2018 is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman 1st Class Kelly Willett/Released)
ICE CAMP SKATE (March 5, 2018) A Royal Canadian DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft flies over the Beaufort Sea to deliver supplies and personnel to Ice Camp Skate during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. ICEX 2018 is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman 1st Class Kelly Willett/Released)
ICE CAMP SKATE (March 5, 2018) Ice Camp Skate personnel unload supplies and cargo from a Royal Canadian DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. ICEX 2018 is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman 1st Class Kelly Willett/Released)
ICE CAMP SKATE (March 5, 2018) Ice Camp Skate personnel unload supplies and cargo from a Royal Canadian DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. ICEX 2018 is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman 1st Class Kelly Willett/Released)
ICE CAMP SKATE (March 5, 2018) Andy Mahoney, University of Alaska Fairbanks research associate processor prepares supplies for transport to Ice Camp Skate during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. ICEX 2018 is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman 1st Class Kelly Willett/Released)
ICE CAMP SKATE (March 5, 2018) A Royal Canadian DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft waits on a runway after delivering supplies and personnel to Ice Camp Skate during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. ICEX 2018 is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman 1st Class Kelly Willett/Released)

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/03/08/icex2018/ U.S. Navy

10 Things to Know about U.S. Navy Submarines

Happy birthday to our Silent Service!

117 years ago today, John Holland sold the 64-ton submersible Holland VI to the Navy, marking the beginning of our submarine force. Several months later, the submarine was commissioned as USS Holland (SS 1).

 

USS Holland (SS 1), 1900.
USS Holland (SS 1), 1900.

 

Here’s a look at how submarines have continuously adapted in both quantity and quality to address more complex and rapidly evolving challenges.

Then…

  1. The world’s first submarine used in warfare, the 8-foot-long Turtle, debuted during the American Revolution. With an oak made, walnut-shell-shaped casing, it bobbed just below the water’s surface. The one-person craft was paddled using a hand crank. It’s objective was to attach an explosive to the hull of an enemy ship and get away before the explosion. In its one combat use, it failed to successfully attach the explosive, however it gave the Royal Navy enough of a scare that they moved their ships to safer distance from American Forces.
Bushnell's American turtle
Bushnell’s American turtle
  1. Experimentation in subsurface craft continued after the American Revolution, including a Confederate boat, Hunley, that sunk a Union warship. Still, it wasn’t until 1900 that the Navy finally commissioned a sub. Even then the technology was rudimentary but continued to improve into World War II where the submarine came of age through legendary acts of heroism and warfighting excellence. Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz said, “We shall never forget that it was our submarines that held the lines against the enemy while our fleets replaced losses and repaired wounds.”
Reproduction of USS Cabrilla (SS 288)'s World War II battle flag
Reproduction of USS Cabrilla (SS 288)’s World War II battle flag
  1. Research and development to enhance the firepower, survivability and endurance of submarines continued after the war, culminating with perhaps the most significant technological advance in submarine history: the advent of nuclear propulsion. On Jan. 17, 1955, the crew of
    USS Nautilus (SSN 571) cast off lines and signaled the memorable and historic message, “Underway on Nuclear Power.”
Undated photo of USS Nautilus (SSN 571)
Undated photo of USS Nautilus (SSN 571)
  1. Late in 1955, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Arleigh Burke established a special project office charged with developing a fleet ballistic missile for sea launch. Just four years later, USS George Washington (SSBN 598) was commissioned. Within six months of commissioning, the ship successfully test fired two Polaris missiles and, within six months of that, deployed for the Navy’s first strategic deterrent patrol. As of June 2014, U.S. submariners have completed more than 4,000 such patrols.
USS George Washington (SSBN 598) underway at sea, June 30, 1960.
USS George Washington (SSBN 598) underway at sea, June 30, 1960.

Now…

  1. Today’s Navy submarines are 100 percent nuclear powered – patrolling the depths of our oceans, taking the fight to our enemies and providing maritime security around the world.
KINGS BAY, Ga. (March 20, 2013) The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) returns to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay after three months at sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class James Kimber/Released)
KINGS BAY, Ga. (March 20, 2013) The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) returns to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay after three months at sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class James Kimber/Released)
  1. We have 69 commissioned submarines – attack (SSN), fleet ballistic missile (SSBN) and guided missile (SSGN).
Next Prev
Attack (SSN) | ARCTIC CIRCLE (March 10, 2016) USS Hartford (SSN 768) surfaces in the Arctic Circle near Ice Camp Sargo during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2016, a five-week exercise designed to research, test and evaluate operational capabilities in the region. (U.S. Navy video by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tyler Thompson and Staff Sgt. Edward Eagerton/Released)
Fleet ballistic missile (SSBN) |
KINGS BAY, Ga. (June 28, 2014) The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) returns to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay following routine operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Rex Nelson/Released)
KINGS BAY, Ga. (June 28, 2014) The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) returns to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay following routine operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Rex Nelson/Released)
Guided missile (SSGN) |
BREMERTON, Wash. (June 26, 2015) The guided-missile submarine USS Ohio (SSGN 726) transits through the Puget Sound after departing Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Kenneth G. Takada/Released)
BREMERTON, Wash. (June 26, 2015) The guided-missile submarine USS Ohio (SSGN 726) transits through the Puget Sound after departing Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Kenneth G. Takada/Released)
Next Prev
  1. Our submarine force includes approximately 28,000 officers, enlisted Sailors, civilians and Reservists. In 2011, female officers began serving aboard U.S. submarines. On June 22, 2015, the Navy announced the selections of the first enlisted female submariners, marking a key milestone in the continued integration of women into the Submarine Force.
PEARL HARBOR (Jan. 13, 2017) Sailors assigned to the USS North Carolina (SSN 777) stand at attention as Cmdr. Gary Montalvo, the ship's commanding officer, accepts a Navy Unit Commendation presented by Capt. Richard Seif, commanding officer of Submarine Squadron 1 onboard Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
PEARL HARBOR (Jan. 13, 2017) Sailors assigned to the USS North Carolina (SSN 777) stand at attention as Cmdr. Gary Montalvo, the ship’s commanding officer, accepts a Navy Unit Commendation presented by Capt. Richard Seif, commanding officer of Submarine Squadron 1 onboard Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
  1. Our submarines are responsible for the #1 mission within the Department of Defense – strategic deterrence – accountable for approximately 50 percent of nuclear warheads.
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 31, 2016) An unarmed Trident II D5 missile launches from the Ohio-class fleet ballistic-missile submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738) off the coast of Florida. The test launch was part of the U.S. Navy Strategic Systems Programs demonstration and shakedown operation certification process. The successful launch certified the readiness of an SSBN crew and the operational performance of the submarine's strategic weapons system before returning to operational availability (U.S. Navy Photo by John Kowalski/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 31, 2016) An unarmed Trident II D5 missile launches from the Ohio-class fleet ballistic-missile submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738) off the coast of Florida. The test launch was part of the U.S. Navy Strategic Systems Programs demonstration and shakedown operation certification process. The successful launch certified the readiness of an SSBN crew and the operational performance of the submarine’s strategic weapons system before returning to operational availability (U.S. Navy Photo by John Kowalski/Released)

Future…

  1. The 12-ship Columbia class will replace the existing Ohio-class nuclear ballistic submarine force; the first patrol of the lead ship, SSBN 826, is scheduled for Fiscal Year 2031.
WASHINGTON (Dec. 14, 2016) A graphic representation of the future USS Columbia (SSBN 826). (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Petty Officer 1st Class Armando Gonzales/Released)
WASHINGTON (Dec. 14, 2016) A graphic representation of the future USS Columbia (SSBN 826). (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Petty Officer 1st Class Armando Gonzales/Released)
  1. The Columbia class reached Milestone B Jan. 4, enabling the program to move into the engineering and manufacturing development phase, where the attention is on achieving an 83 percent design maturity prior to construction starting in 2021.

Statistics current as of Nov. 6, 2015

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/04/11/10-things-to-know-about-u-s-navy-submarines/ U.S. Navy

Five Things to Know about USS Illinois (SSN 786)

The Virginia-class attack submarine USS Illinois (SSN 786) will be commissioned during a 11 a.m. ET ceremony at Submarine Base New London in Groton, Connecticut, Oct. 29, 2016, which you can watch here on Navy Live or on the Navy’s Facebook page.

Here are five things that you should know about the U.S. Navy’s newest fast attack submarine:

1. Namesake: USS Illinois is named after the 21st state added to the Union.

USS Illinois (BB 7) is anchored off New York City, 1905. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
USS Illinois (BB 7) is anchored off New York City, 1905. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

The submarine is the first Navy vessel named for the state since the battleship Illinois (BB 7) was commissioned in 1901. The first USS Illinois was a battleship and was part of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet that circumnavigated the world in 1907, introducing America as a global power.

2. Sponsor:

First Lady of the United States and Illinois native, Michelle Obama is the ship’s sponsor and will be in attendance for the commissioning.

First Lady Michelle Obama reacts to seeing her initials welded onto a steel plate by welder Michael Macomber during a keel-laying ceremony for the U.S. Navy’s future USS Illinois at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard in North Kingston, R.I., June 2, 2014. (Official White House photo by Chuck Kennedy)
First Lady Michelle Obama reacts to seeing her initials welded onto a steel plate by welder Michael Macomber during a keel-laying ceremony for the U.S. Navy’s future USS Illinois at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard in North Kingston, R.I., June 2, 2014. (Official White House photo by Chuck Kennedy)

The last submarine sponsored by a first lady was USS Texas (SSN 775), which was sponsored by Laura Bush and commissioned Sept. 9, 2006.

The ship sponsor for USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23), a Sea-Wolf class submarine, was former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, Feb. 19, 2005.

3. Size and endurance:

SSN-786 is 377 feet long, has a 34-foot beam, and will be able to dive to depths greater than 800 feet and operate at speeds in excess of 25 knots submerged while displacing approximately 7,800 tons submerged. It will operate for more than 30 years without ever refueling.

GROTON, CT (Aug. 1, 2016) The future USS Illinois (SSN 786) conducts sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Aug. 1, 2016) The future USS Illinois (SSN 786) conducts sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)

4. Capability:

Illinois is the third Block III submarine of the Virginia-class.

GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 27, 2016) Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Illinois (SSN 786) raise the flags during the rehearsal for the upcoming commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois, the Navy's newest submarine on Oct 29. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 27, 2016) Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Illinois (SSN 786) raise the flags during the rehearsal for the upcoming commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois, the Navy’s newest submarine on Oct 29. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)

The Virginia class has been improved to enhance littoral operations. The class has special features to support Special Operation Forces, including a reconfigurable torpedo room that can accommodate a large number of Special Operation Forces and all of their equipment for prolonged deployments and future off-board payloads. The class also has a large lock-in/lock-out chamber for divers. Traditional periscopes have been replaced by two photonics masts that host visible and infrared digital cameras atop telescoping arms. The Block III submarines have replaced the 12 individual Vertical Launch System (VLS) tubes with two 87-inch Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching six Tomahawk cruise missiles. The VPTs simplify construction, reduce acquisition costs and provide for more payload flexibility than the smaller VLS tubes due to their added volume.

5. Missions:

SSN-786 is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface warfare; delivery of special operations forces; strike warfare; irregular warfare; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and mine warfare.

Learn more about the U.S. Navy’s Silent Service in this video and the below infographic.

GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 27, 2016) Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Illinois (SSN 786) raise the flags during the rehearse for the upcoming commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois the Navy's newest submarine on Oct 29. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 27, 2016) Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Illinois (SSN 786) raise the flags during the rehearse for the upcoming commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois the Navy’s newest submarine on Oct 29. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
WASHINGTON (Oct. 28, 2016) An informational graphic describing the Virginia-class attack submarine USS Illinois (SSN 786). The boat will be commissioned Oct. 29 in Groton, Conn. (U.S. Navy graphic illustration by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)
WASHINGTON (Oct. 28, 2016) An informational graphic describing the Virginia-class attack submarine USS Illinois (SSN 786). The boat will be commissioned Oct. 29 in Groton, Conn. (U.S. Navy graphic illustration by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

Welcome SSN-786 and its Sailors to the fleet by leaving a comment below.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/10/28/five-things-to-know-about-uss-illinois-ssn-786/ U.S. Navy

Five Things to Know about USS Illinois (SSN 786)

The Virginia-class attack submarine USS Illinois (SSN 786) will be commissioned during a 11 a.m. ET ceremony at Submarine Base New London in Groton, Connecticut, Oct. 29, 2016, which you can watch here on Navy Live or on the Navy’s Facebook page.

Here are five things that you should know about the U.S. Navy’s newest fast attack submarine:

1. Namesake: USS Illinois is named after the 21st state added to the Union.

USS Illinois (BB 7) is anchored off New York City, 1905. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
USS Illinois (BB 7) is anchored off New York City, 1905. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

The submarine is the first Navy vessel named for the state since the battleship Illinois (BB 7) was commissioned in 1901. The first USS Illinois was a battleship and was part of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet that circumnavigated the world in 1907, introducing America as a global power.

2. Sponsor:

First Lady of the United States and Illinois native, Michelle Obama is the ship’s sponsor and will be in attendance for the commissioning.

First Lady Michelle Obama reacts to seeing her initials welded onto a steel plate by welder Michael Macomber during a keel-laying ceremony for the U.S. Navy’s future USS Illinois at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard in North Kingston, R.I., June 2, 2014. (Official White House photo by Chuck Kennedy)
First Lady Michelle Obama reacts to seeing her initials welded onto a steel plate by welder Michael Macomber during a keel-laying ceremony for the U.S. Navy’s future USS Illinois at the General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard in North Kingston, R.I., June 2, 2014. (Official White House photo by Chuck Kennedy)

The last submarine sponsored by a first lady was USS Texas (SSN 775), which was sponsored by Laura Bush and commissioned Sept. 9, 2006.

The ship sponsor for USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23), a Sea-Wolf class submarine, was former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, Feb. 19, 2005.

3. Size and endurance:

SSN-786 is 377 feet long, has a 34-foot beam, and will be able to dive to depths greater than 800 feet and operate at speeds in excess of 25 knots submerged while displacing approximately 7,800 tons submerged. It will operate for more than 30 years without ever refueling.

GROTON, CT (Aug. 1, 2016) The future USS Illinois (SSN 786) conducts sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Aug. 1, 2016) The future USS Illinois (SSN 786) conducts sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat/Released)

4. Capability:

Illinois is the third Block III submarine of the Virginia-class.

GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 27, 2016) Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Illinois (SSN 786) raise the flags during the rehearsal for the upcoming commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois, the Navy's newest submarine on Oct 29. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 27, 2016) Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Illinois (SSN 786) raise the flags during the rehearsal for the upcoming commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois, the Navy’s newest submarine on Oct 29. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)

The Virginia class has been improved to enhance littoral operations. The class has special features to support Special Operation Forces, including a reconfigurable torpedo room that can accommodate a large number of Special Operation Forces and all of their equipment for prolonged deployments and future off-board payloads. The class also has a large lock-in/lock-out chamber for divers. Traditional periscopes have been replaced by two photonics masts that host visible and infrared digital cameras atop telescoping arms. The Block III submarines have replaced the 12 individual Vertical Launch System (VLS) tubes with two 87-inch Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching six Tomahawk cruise missiles. The VPTs simplify construction, reduce acquisition costs and provide for more payload flexibility than the smaller VLS tubes due to their added volume.

5. Missions:

SSN-786 is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface warfare; delivery of special operations forces; strike warfare; irregular warfare; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and mine warfare.

Learn more about the U.S. Navy’s Silent Service in this video and the below infographic.

GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 27, 2016) Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Illinois (SSN 786) raise the flags during the rehearse for the upcoming commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois the Navy's newest submarine on Oct 29. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 27, 2016) Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Illinois (SSN 786) raise the flags during the rehearse for the upcoming commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois the Navy’s newest submarine on Oct 29. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
WASHINGTON (Oct. 28, 2016) An informational graphic describing the Virginia-class attack submarine USS Illinois (SSN 786). The boat will be commissioned Oct. 29 in Groton, Conn. (U.S. Navy graphic illustration by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)
WASHINGTON (Oct. 28, 2016) An informational graphic describing the Virginia-class attack submarine USS Illinois (SSN 786). The boat will be commissioned Oct. 29 in Groton, Conn. (U.S. Navy graphic illustration by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

Welcome SSN-786 and its Sailors to the fleet by leaving a comment below.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/10/28/five-things-to-know-about-uss-illinois-ssn-786/ U.S. Navy