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Category Archives: USS Zumwalt

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

PHILIPPINES (Mach 11, 2019) Seabees with Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Three (NMCB 3) complete the Santa Elena Evacuation Site Construction Project as a part of Pacific Partnership 19 in Tacloban City, Philippines. Pacific Partnership, now in its 14th iteration, is the largest annual multinational humanitarian assistance and disaster relief preparedness mission conducted in the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Marine Corps video by Cpl. Jessica Valencia/Released) 190311-M-QX324-590

Cmdr. Craig Trent, commanding officer of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) observes from the bridge while departing Plymouth, England, March 25, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Turner/Released)
Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class Nicholas Allen speaks through a headset during flight operations aboard the Whidbey Island-class amphibious dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Chris Roys/Released)
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith, center, and Sgt. Major of the Marine Corps Ronald L. Green, left, pose for a photo with chief petty officers during Pacific Blitz 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Sarah Villegas/Released)
Rear Adm. Stephen Evans, from Beaufort, S.C., commander of Carrier Strike Group 2, speaks with Rev. Harold Syfrett, during his visit to Patriots Point Naval and Maritime Museum. (Lt. Christopher Hanson/Released)
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson and his wife, Dana, pose for a picture with Washington Nationals mascot, George, at the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society’s “Step up to the Plate” Gala. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Nick Brown/Released)
Electronics Technician 3rd Class Michael Lemay, assigned to Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 2, Detachment Guam, stands watch aboard a Mark VI patrol boat during a routine underway in the Philippine Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kory Alsberry/Released)
Sailors assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) travel through the Behm Canal in a rigid-hull inflatable boat. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Seaman Shania Prince, from Rochester, New Hampshire, observes small boat operations while standing aft watch aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Barker/Released)
Culinary Specialist 1st Class Matthew Harper, from Ocala, Florida, prepares eggplant parmesan aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Chief Aviation Electrician’s Mate Michael Morrow, from Hot Springs, Arkansas, signals to warn for propellers in front of a C-2 Greyhound transport aircraft assigned to Fleet Logistics Combat Support Squadron (VRC) 30, Detachment 4, on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) in the Arabian Gulf, March 23, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jarrod A. Schad/Released)
Quartermaster Seaman Joshua Davis, from San Diego, California, uses flashing-light Morse code aboard the Avenger class mine countermeasures ship USS Chief (MCM 14) to communicate with the Philippine navy frigate BRP Ramon Alcaraz (FF 16) during a maritime cooperative activity. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jordan Crouch/Released)
Marine Corps Cpl. Jacob Bautista, a micro-miniature repairman with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, removes a burnt capacitor from a radio circuit board aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD-3). (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Aaron Henson/Released)
Ensign Joshua Thomas acts as the helm safety officer aboard the bridge aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) as they get underway from Naval Station Rota, Spain, March 23, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Fred Gray IV/Released/Released)
Personnel Specialist Seaman Samantha Braband acts as the master helmsman aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) as the ship leaves port at Naval Station Rota, Spain for a patrol, March 23, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Fred Gray IV/Released)
Cmdr. Christopher J. Schwarz, left, commanding officer of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Gonzalez (DDG 66), salutes a folded American flag presented by Command Master Chief Samira Carney during a burial-at-sea ceremony aboard the ship, March 20, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Maxwell Anderson/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

 

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

PHILIPPINES (Mach 11, 2019) Seabees with Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Three (NMCB 3) complete the Santa Elena Evacuation Site Construction Project as a part of Pacific Partnership 19 in Tacloban City, Philippines. Pacific Partnership, now in its 14th iteration, is the largest annual multinational humanitarian assistance and disaster relief preparedness mission conducted in the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Marine Corps video by Cpl. Jessica Valencia/Released) 190311-M-QX324-590

Cmdr. Craig Trent, commanding officer of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) observes from the bridge while departing Plymouth, England, March 25, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Turner/Released)
Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class Nicholas Allen speaks through a headset during flight operations aboard the Whidbey Island-class amphibious dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Chris Roys/Released)
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith, center, and Sgt. Major of the Marine Corps Ronald L. Green, left, pose for a photo with chief petty officers during Pacific Blitz 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Sarah Villegas/Released)
Rear Adm. Stephen Evans, from Beaufort, S.C., commander of Carrier Strike Group 2, speaks with Rev. Harold Syfrett, during his visit to Patriots Point Naval and Maritime Museum. (Lt. Christopher Hanson/Released)
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson and his wife, Dana, pose for a picture with Washington Nationals mascot, George, at the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society’s “Step up to the Plate” Gala. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Nick Brown/Released)
Electronics Technician 3rd Class Michael Lemay, assigned to Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 2, Detachment Guam, stands watch aboard a Mark VI patrol boat during a routine underway in the Philippine Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kory Alsberry/Released)
Sailors assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) travel through the Behm Canal in a rigid-hull inflatable boat. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Seaman Shania Prince, from Rochester, New Hampshire, observes small boat operations while standing aft watch aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Barker/Released)
Culinary Specialist 1st Class Matthew Harper, from Ocala, Florida, prepares eggplant parmesan aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)
Chief Aviation Electrician’s Mate Michael Morrow, from Hot Springs, Arkansas, signals to warn for propellers in front of a C-2 Greyhound transport aircraft assigned to Fleet Logistics Combat Support Squadron (VRC) 30, Detachment 4, on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) in the Arabian Gulf, March 23, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jarrod A. Schad/Released)
Quartermaster Seaman Joshua Davis, from San Diego, California, uses flashing-light Morse code aboard the Avenger class mine countermeasures ship USS Chief (MCM 14) to communicate with the Philippine navy frigate BRP Ramon Alcaraz (FF 16) during a maritime cooperative activity. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jordan Crouch/Released)
Marine Corps Cpl. Jacob Bautista, a micro-miniature repairman with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, removes a burnt capacitor from a radio circuit board aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD-3). (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Aaron Henson/Released)
Ensign Joshua Thomas acts as the helm safety officer aboard the bridge aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) as they get underway from Naval Station Rota, Spain, March 23, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Fred Gray IV/Released/Released)
Personnel Specialist Seaman Samantha Braband acts as the master helmsman aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) as the ship leaves port at Naval Station Rota, Spain for a patrol, March 23, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Fred Gray IV/Released)
Cmdr. Christopher J. Schwarz, left, commanding officer of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Gonzalez (DDG 66), salutes a folded American flag presented by Command Master Chief Samira Carney during a burial-at-sea ceremony aboard the ship, March 20, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Maxwell Anderson/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

 

Why I Love Being a U.S. Navy Surface Warfare Officer

By Vice Adm. Tom Rowden
Commander, Naval Surface Forces

Yesterday, midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy found out their service assignment in the U.S. Navy. For those midshipmen who will become surface warfare officers, as well as their comrades who received notification earlier in the academic semester at Naval Reserve Training Officer Corps units across the country, I want to congratulate all of you and welcome you to the surface warfare community – a community that I love dearly.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (Nov. 17, 2016) Midshipman 1st Class Katelyn Shinavski receives her service assignment as a surface warfare officer. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (Nov. 17, 2016) Midshipman 1st Class Katelyn Shinavski receives her service assignment as a surface warfare officer. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

 

It is a great time to be a surface warfare officer! Among all the warfare communities you could have chosen, SWOs will be the first to hit deck plates, leading Sailors almost immediately following graduation. You will “lead early and lead often” and you will further develop and hone the leadership skills you have been developing over the past four years.

WATERS SOUTH OF JAPAN (Jan. 15, 2015) – The forward-deployed Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89) fires a MK 45 – 5-inch gun during a live fire exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christian Senyk/Released)
WATERS SOUTH OF JAPAN (Jan. 15, 2015) – The forward-deployed Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89) fires a MK 45 – 5-inch gun during a live fire exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christian Senyk/Released)

You will be leading our Sailors in the midst of a rapidly changing security environment in the maritime domain. In response, our Navy is delivering new ships and weapons systems while, at the same time, improving our training and tactics to address these new and sophisticated threats. Our Surface Forces are executing exciting missions all over the world and regardless of your ship type, job assignment, or mission, each of you will play a vital role in shaping the future of our community and the maritime environment.

The Surface Warfare community is also on the leading edge of adopting personnel policies that are increasingly rewarding our most talented officers. You are embarking on a career path that offers more flexibility than any previous generations of surface warfare officers with unique opportunities to pursue graduate level education, intern at some of the most prestigious global companies, and train to become an expert tactician in the fleet.

I take great pride in leading a community that, in essence, began 241 years ago with our nation’s and our Navy’s first six frigates. There is no question that the surface community serves as a primary integrator in today’s warfighting disciplines, from the tactical to the theater level – with capability for deterrence, sea control, and power projection around the globe.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Apr. 20, 2016) –The Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111) (left) steams in formation with USS Decatur (DDG 73) and USS Momsen (DDG 92). Spruance, along with guided-missile destroyers USS Momsen (DDG 92) and USS Decatur (DDG 73), and embarked “Devil Fish” and “Warbirds” detachments of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 49, deployed as part of a U.S. 3rd Fleet Pacific Surface Action Group (PAC SAG) under Destroyer Squadron (CDS) 31. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Will Gaskill/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Apr. 20, 2016) –The Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111) (left) steams in formation with USS Decatur (DDG 73) and USS Momsen (DDG 92). Spruance, along with guided-missile destroyers USS Momsen (DDG 92) and USS Decatur (DDG 73), and embarked “Devil Fish” and “Warbirds” detachments of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 49, deployed as part of a U.S. 3rd Fleet Pacific Surface Action Group (PAC SAG) under Destroyer Squadron (CDS) 31. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Will Gaskill/Released)

 

CHESAPEAKE BAY, Md. (Oct. 17, 2016) Aircraft CF-02, an F-35 Lightning II Carrier Variant attached to the F-35 Pax River Integrated Test Force (ITF) assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 completes a flyover of the guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). (U.S. Navy photo by Andy Wolfe/Released)
CHESAPEAKE BAY, Md. (Oct. 17, 2016) Aircraft CF-02, an F-35 Lightning II Carrier Variant attached to the F-35 Pax River Integrated Test Force (ITF) assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 completes a flyover of the guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). (U.S. Navy photo by Andy Wolfe/Released)

For these reasons and more, I continue to love being a surface warfare officer. I have the honor of being the “SWO Boss,” and I could not be more excited about the opportunities that await all of you. Leadership is and will remain the bedrock of our community and we each play a significant role in making our Navy a more mobile, lethal, and flexible force.

The future surface community in which you will be leading is already unfolding before you. From embarking the new fifth-generation F-35B Joint Strike Fighter aircraft on our amphibious ships to USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) and the innovative technologies she is ushering into our Navy, we are dedicated to enhancing the lethality of our forces by improving the reach of today’s ships through new payloads of more capable weapons, sensors and unmanned vehicles.

I take resounding pride in knowing all this is powered by a tremendous community of professionals – from seaman to admirals – each key to our daily success. You will now be joining their ranks and I want you to know that your impact will be immediate!

America is a maritime nation and as such needs a strong maritime force – the appetite for surface forces has never been greater, and I can say with confidence that we are doing our part to answer the call. It’s truly gratifying to be in a community that has been and will continue to be so critical to American power and prosperity.

Again, congratulations to all of you of your assignment to surface warfare, a community that I love. Welcome to our team!

EVERETT, Wash. (Nov. 1, 2016) Vice Adm. Thomas Rowden, commander, Naval Surface Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet, speaks to Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86) during his visit to Naval Station Everett.. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joseph Montemarano/Released)
EVERETT, Wash. (Nov. 1, 2016) Vice Adm. Thomas Rowden, commander, Naval Surface Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet, speaks to Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86) during his visit to Naval Station Everett.. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joseph Montemarano/Released)

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

Seaman Quay Salter, front, relays information regarding the jet blast deflector on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Robert J. Baldock)
Seaman Quay Salter, front, relays information regarding the jet blast deflector on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Robert J. Baldock)
The U.S. Navy Ceremonial Color Guard performs a close Order Drill for students from Carver High School and Hampstead Hill Academy during a community relations event at Patterson Park during Maryland Fleet Week and Air Show Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer Third Class Justin R. Pacheco/Released)
The U.S. Navy Ceremonial Color Guard performs a close Order Drill for students from Carver High School and Hampstead Hill Academy during a community relations event at Patterson Park during Maryland Fleet Week and Air Show Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer Third Class Justin R. Pacheco/Released)
Petty Officer 3rd Class Raymond Au, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92), and Coast Guardsmen, assigned to Coast Guard District 14 Law Enforcement Detachment, embark a rigid inflatable boat (RIB) in preparation to board merchant fishing vessels for inspection as part of Oceania Maritime Security Initiative. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Jay C. Pugh/Released)
Petty Officer 3rd Class Raymond Au, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92), and Coast Guardsmen, assigned to Coast Guard District 14 Law Enforcement Detachment, embark a rigid inflatable boat (RIB) in preparation to board merchant fishing vessels for inspection as part of Oceania Maritime Security Initiative. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Jay C. Pugh/Released)
Midshipmen with the U.S. Naval Academy (USNA) stand at parade rest during the Second Class Parents Weekend Formal Dress Parade at the USNA, Annapolis, Md. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Samantha K. Braun/Released)
Midshipmen with the U.S. Naval Academy (USNA) stand at parade rest during the Second Class Parents Weekend Formal Dress Parade at the USNA, Annapolis, Md. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Samantha K. Braun/Released)
Sailors pick up trash on a bike path along Pearl Harbor during a volunteer clean-up. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Nardel Gervacio/Released)
Sailors pick up trash on a bike path along Pearl Harbor during a volunteer clean-up. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Nardel Gervacio/Released)
The crew of the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), renders a salute during the ship's commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Armando Gonzales/Released)
The crew of the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), renders a salute during the ship’s commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Armando Gonzales/Released)
Chief Petty Officer Jed May, a Steamboat Springs, Colorado native, guides an MH-60S helicopter during flight operations aboard littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer Second Class Michaela Garrison/Released)
Chief Petty Officer Jed May, a Steamboat Springs, Colorado native, guides an MH-60S helicopter during flight operations aboard littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer Second Class Michaela Garrison/Released)
Seaman McKinley Edwards, from San Diego, mans the rails aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8) as it departs Naval Base San Diego for a western Pacific deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Dennis Grube)
Seaman McKinley Edwards, from San Diego, mans the rails aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8) as it departs Naval Base San Diego for a western Pacific deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Dennis Grube)
Petty Officer 2nd Class Steve Bush, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 1, conducts a pool familiarization dive while participating in Clear Horizon (CH16) in Chinhae, Republic of Korea. (U.S. Navy Combat Camera Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Daniel Rolston)
Petty Officer 2nd Class Steve Bush, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 1, conducts a pool familiarization dive while participating in Clear Horizon (CH16) in Chinhae, Republic of Korea. (U.S. Navy Combat Camera Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Daniel Rolston)
Cadet Seaman Apprentices Mariah Freely, left, and Molly Riegel, Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps cadets, pose for a photograph at Baltimore's Inner Harbour during the Maryland Fleet Week and Air Show Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Justin R. Pacheco/Released)
Cadet Seaman Apprentices Mariah Freely, left, and Molly Riegel, Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps cadets, pose for a photograph at Baltimore’s Inner Harbour during the Maryland Fleet Week and Air Show Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Justin R. Pacheco/Released)
Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) Sean Stackley, Commander, U.S. Pacific Command(PACOM) Adm. Harry Harris, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson and Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus render honors for the national anthem during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Nathan Laird/Released)
Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) Sean Stackley, Commander, U.S. Pacific Command(PACOM) Adm. Harry Harris, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson and Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus render honors for the national anthem during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Nathan Laird/Released)
Petty Officer 1st Class Saran McQueen (left) and Petty Officer 1st Class Mariana Carrascomarquez, attached to Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC), read to a third grade class at Shelton Elementary School. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Travis DiPerna/ Released)
Petty Officer 1st Class Saran McQueen (left) and Petty Officer 1st Class Mariana Carrascomarquez, attached to Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC), read to a third grade class at Shelton Elementary School. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Travis DiPerna/ Released)
Sailors man the rails on the flight deck of the U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), as the ship pulls into Busan for a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Kenneth Abbate/Released)
Sailors man the rails on the flight deck of the U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), as the ship pulls into Busan for a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Kenneth Abbate/Released)
Lt. j.g. Eric Fielding stands by as helm safety aboard the Whidbey Island-class amphibious dock landing ship USS Germantown (LSD 42) during transit into Sihanoukville, Cambodia. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Raymond D. Diaz III/Released)
Lt. j.g. Eric Fielding stands by as helm safety aboard the Whidbey Island-class amphibious dock landing ship USS Germantown (LSD 42) during transit into Sihanoukville, Cambodia. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Raymond D. Diaz III/Released)
Petty Officer 1st Class John Bailey from Navy Information Operations Command Colorado presents a single rose in memory of the families and loved ones of missing shipmates who keep faith quietly awaiting their return during the POW/MIA ceremony for the 241st Navy Ball at the Heritage Eagle Bend Golf Club. The Navy Ball is an annual event which celebrates the heritage, history, and the day Congress created the United States Navy 241-years ago on Oct. 13, 1775. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer Second 2nd Class Robert A. Hartland/Released)
Petty Officer 1st Class John Bailey from Navy Information Operations Command Colorado presents a single rose in memory of the families and loved ones of missing shipmates who keep faith quietly awaiting their return during the POW/MIA ceremony for the 241st Navy Ball. The Navy Ball is an annual event which celebrates the heritage, history, and the day Congress created the United States Navy 241-years ago on Oct. 13, 1775. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer Second 2nd Class Robert A. Hartland/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

 

USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) Joins the U.S. Navy’s Fleet

Our newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) joined the U.S. Navy’s fleet when it was commissioned into active service Oct. 15 in Baltimore, Maryland.

The Innovative Ship. Zumwalt, the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers, features a state-of-the-art electric propulsion system, wave-piercing tumblehome hull, stealth design, and the latest warfighting technology and weaponry available. The Zumwalt-class destroyer will be capable of performing a range of deterrence, power projection, sea control, and command and control missions while allowing the Navy to evolve with new systems and missions.
The Innovator. DDG-1000 honors an innovative leader in our Navy’s history, embodies the legacy of warfighting excellence and innovation of Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., a veteran of World War II and the conflicts in Korea and Vietnam. He exemplified honor, courage and commitment during 32 years of dedicated naval service. Believing it was his job to “modernize and humanize” the Navy, Zumwalt chose to embrace change and to lead it from within. 

 

“On behalf of the U.S. Naval Surface Force, I proudly accept ownership of the Navy’s newest ship to the fleet.”
– Vice Adm. Tom Rowden
Commander, Naval Surface Forces

U.S. Navy photos by Petty Officer 1st Class Nathan Laird

The Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is moored to the pier during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
The Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is moored to the pier during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
The color guard prepares to parade the colors during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
The color guard prepares to parade the colors during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
(Left to right) Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) Sean Stackley, Commander, U.S. Pacific Command(PACOM) Adm. Harry Harris, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson and Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus render honors for the national anthem during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
(Left to right) Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) Sean Stackley, Commander, U.S. Pacific Command(PACOM) Adm. Harry Harris, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson and Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus render honors for the national anthem during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
(Left to right) Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus and U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland render honors for the national anthem during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
(Left to right) Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus and U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland render honors for the national anthem during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) Sean Stackley delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) Sean Stackley delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson introduces Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson introduces Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
The iconic Brewer's Hill neighborhood of Baltimore can be seen in the background as Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
The iconic Brewer’s Hill neighborhood of Baltimore can be seen in the background as Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
The national ensign and commissioning pennant fly over the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
The national ensign and commissioning pennant fly over the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
The crew of the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), brings the ship to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
The crew of the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), brings the ship to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Balloons fly and the crowd applauds as the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is brought to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Balloons fly and the crowd applauds as the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is brought to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Capt. James Kirk, commanding officer of the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), delivers remarks during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Capt. James Kirk, commanding officer of the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), delivers remarks during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
The crew of the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), brings the ship to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
The crew of the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), brings the ship to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Balloons fly and the crowd applauds as the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is brought to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Balloons fly and the crowd applauds as the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is brought to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson conducts a media interview during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
161015-N-AT895-508 BALTIMORE, (Oct. 15, 2016) Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson conducts a media interview during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Nathan Laird/Released)
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson conducts a media interview during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson conducts a media interview during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson talks with Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Steven Giordano during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson talks with Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Steven Giordano during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).

Zumwalt Crew Returning Honor for Namesake’s Long time Aide-de-Camp

Before USS Zumwalt’s commissioning, Peter Spiro, son of retired Col. Michael Spiro, delivered an urn containing his father’s ashes aboard DDG-1000, Oct. 14.

Col. Spiro, who was the long time aide-de-camp of Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, escorted Zumwalt’s remains home following his death Jan. 2, 2000. Following the ship’s commissioning, Zumwalt’s crew will return the honor and commit Spiro’s remains to sea during its transit to its homeport of San Diego, California.

U.S. Navy photos by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell

BALTIMORE (Oct. 14, 2016) Peter Spiro, son of retired Col. Michael Spiro, delivers an urn containing his fatherÕs ashes aboard future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). Col. Spiro was the long time aide-de-camp of Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, the ship namesake. Zumwalt, the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers designed to strengthen naval power from the sea, will be commissioned Oct. 15 in Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

BALTIMORE (Oct. 14, 2016) Peter Spiro, son of retired Col. Michael Spiro, delivers an urn containing his fatherÕs ashes aboard future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). Col. Spiro was the long time aide-de-camp of Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, the ship namesake. Zumwalt, the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers designed to strengthen naval power from the sea, will be commissioned Oct. 15 in Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

BALTIMORE (Oct. 14, 2016) Peter Spiro, son of retired Col. Michael Spiro, delivers an urn containing his fatherÕs ashes aboard future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). Col. Spiro was the long time aide-de-camp of Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, the ship namesake. Zumwalt, the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers designed to strengthen naval power from the sea, will be commissioned Oct. 15 in Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

BALTIMORE (Oct. 14, 2016) Peter Spiro, son of retired Col. Michael Spiro, delivers an urn containing his fatherÕs ashes aboard future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). Col. Spiro was the long time aide-de-camp of Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, the ship namesake. Zumwalt, the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers designed to strengthen naval power from the sea, will be commissioned Oct. 15 in Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

BALTIMORE (Oct. 14, 2016) Peter Spiro, son of retired Col. Michael Spiro, delivers an urn containing his fatherÕs ashes aboard future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). Col. Spiro was the long time aide-de-camp of Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, the ship namesake. Zumwalt, the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers designed to strengthen naval power from the sea, will be commissioned Oct. 15 in Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

Capt. Scott Tait, executive officer, Petty Officer 1st Class Clair Dabrowski, and Petty Officer 2nd Class William Pause transport the urn of retired Col. Michael Spiro aboard future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).

BALTIMORE (Oct. 14, 2016) Capt. Scott Tait, executive officer, Petty Officer 1st Class Clair Dabrowski, and Petty Officer 2nd Class William Pause transport the urn of retired Col. Michael Spiro aboard future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). Col. Spiro was the long time aide-de-camp of Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, the ship namesake. Zumwalt, the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers designed to strengthen naval power from the sea, will be commissioned Oct. 15 in Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

BALTIMORE (Oct. 14, 2016) Capt. Scott Tait, executive officer, Petty Officer 1st Class Clair Dabrowski, and Petty Officer 2nd Class William Pause transport the urn of retired Col. Michael Spiro aboard future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). Col. Spiro was the long time aide-de-camp of Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, the ship namesake. Zumwalt, the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers designed to strengthen naval power from the sea, will be commissioned Oct. 15 in Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

BALTIMORE (Oct. 14, 2016) Capt. Scott Tait, executive officer, Petty Officer 1st Class Clair Dabrowski, and Petty Officer 2nd Class William Pause transport the urn of retired Col. Michael Spiro aboard future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). Col. Spiro was the long time aide-de-camp of Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, the ship namesake. Zumwalt, the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers designed to strengthen naval power from the sea, will be commissioned Oct. 15 in Baltimore. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

Five Things to Know about USS Zumwalt and its Namesake

“DDG-1000 is one of the most innovative and technologically-advanced ships our Navy has built and it is this spirit of innovation, this commitment to forward thinking and the ability of our Navy and its sailors to see beyond the horizon that we honor as we commission the USS Zumwalt. Just as DDG-1000 is the first of its class, so too was Adm. Elmo Zumwalt.”
– Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus

Learn more about the innovator and the innovative ship named in his honor with these five things to know about each of them.

USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000)


Adm. Elmo R. “Bud” Zumwalt Jr.

USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) Commissioning

The Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) was commissioned into active service Saturday, Oct. 15, at North Locust Point in Baltimore.

DDG 1000 is the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission surface combatants and is named for Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt, former chief of naval operations. A veteran of World War II as well as the conflicts in Korea and Vietnam, Zumwalt exemplified honor, courage, and commitment during 32 years of dedicated naval service, earning a Bronze Star with Valor for his actions during the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

Read more about DDG-1000’s commissioning.

Join the conversation on social media using #USSZumwalt.

Congratulate the ship’s Sailors by commenting below.

Future USS Zumwalt Underway for Commissioning

By Capt. James A. Kirk
Commanding officer, PCU Zumwalt (DDG 1000)

With the last line taken in, PCU Zumwalt (DDG 1000) eased away from the pier and set sail from Bath, Maine, today, to join the Fleet – culminating years of effort by thousands of people. For Zumwalt’s crew, the call over the general announcing system, “Underway, shift colors” signaled the end of more than three years of training across the country in classrooms, labs and on the ship as our Navy’s next generation destroyer was being activated and tested. It marks the beginning of the ship’s life at-sea with Sailors at the helm.

BATH, Maine (Sept. 7, 2016) Facebook Live video from the Navy’s Facebook page of the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced surface ship, future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) departing Bath Iron Works to begin its 3-month journey to its new homeport in San Diego. (U.S Navy video/Released)

Since the beginning of 2013, 147 Sailors from across the U.S. and all walks of life have reported for duty to our pre-commissioning unit to train and ready themselves to take DDG-1000 to sea in service to their nation. To walk through the passageways of the mighty Zumwalt and see the diversity and richness of culture reflected in our ship’s Sailors affirms the ideal that inclusion strengthens our Navy as a warfighting force. The warfighters who serve aboard this ship are the living legacy of our namesake, Adm. Elmo R. “Bud” Zumwalt Jr., who dedicated his life to excellence and equality.

Our crew embodies Adm. Zumwalt’s innovative spirit. Each Sailor stands ready to adapt and master our ship’s new technology and provide operational commanders a lethal and precise instrument of naval power. Their technical expertise, teamwork and toughness –forged through training and years of experience at sea –have been on display since the Navy took custody of the ship May 20, 2016. Throughout the summer, our crew smartly executed move aboard, a series of inspections and assessments across the spectrum of operations, an engineering light off assessment and crew certifications without a hitch.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dec. 7, 2015)  The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is underway for the first time conducting at-sea tests and trials in the Atlantic Ocean.  (U.S. Navy video courtesy of General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Released)

New construction duty is challenging. It is even more so when the ship is the first in a new class with new and advanced technologies being put to sea for the first time. Our crew has taken on every challenge and conquered. These plankowners will be a part of the ship’s legacy for as long as USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) sails. They can take pride in the fact that they began the winning tradition and paved the way for future generations to succeed.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (April 21, 2016) The future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) transits the Atlantic Ocean during acceptance trials with the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). (U.S. Navy/Released)

ATLANTIC OCEAN (April 21, 2016) The future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) transits the Atlantic Ocean during acceptance trials with the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). (U.S. Navy/Released)

As Vice Adm. Thomas Rowden, commander, Naval Surface Force, said about our team’s resiliency during his August visit to the ship, “Shipbuilding is a tough and frustrating job, and I’m proud of how you’ve been able to not only take care of the ship, but also take care of each other.”

In departing Bath, Maine, the door closed on the first chapter of the Zumwalt’s life. After commissioning in Baltimore, Maryland, on October 15, the ship will sail to its homeport in San Diego, California. Soon after arriving, DDG-1000 will enter a post-delivery industrial availability and mission systems activation period to ready this stealth destroyer for operational testing and its maiden deployment. With all the new technology, there will undoubtedly be challenges along the way, but Zumwalt’s Sailors are exactly the right team to succeed. They are highly skilled technicians and team players who have the toughness to get the job done. I am humbled and privileged to serve alongside these men and women.

Pax Propter Vim – Peace Through Power

The New Guy’s View: My Priorities as Director, Surface Warfare

By Rear Adm. Ron Boxall
Director, Surface Warfare (OPNAV N96)

Shipmates and friends,

Hello from the hallowed halls of the Pentagon! Last month, I relieved Rear Adm. Pete Fanta as director, Surface Warfare (N96). Pete, like those before him, has done a lot of heavy lifting to ensure that our surface force has what it needs to keep our ships, systems and Sailors resourced to the best of our ability. And through his adroit leadership, I believe our surface forces are bearing the fruits of his hard work and that we are making great progress in bringing offensive “punch” back into our surface fleet. I am excited to take the torch.

I am a “repeat offender” to the OPNAV staff. This will be my 4th OPNAV tour, and my 6th Pentagon tour — all since my first command tour aboard USS Carney (DDG 64). It is hard to believe that I was the deputy N96 for now-Vice Adm. Tom Rowden just three years ago. I am heartened to see that we have made great strides in some areas, and in others, we continue to push the ball down the field. But by leaving for a few years, you get to see “snapshot” views of the progress that aren’t always evident in the glacial pace of day-to-day operations. We have to work harder to accelerate the speed with which we get new technology to the fleet. And we will try to do just that.

WATERS SURROUNDING THE KOREAN PENINSULA (March 24, 2016) - Ships assigned to the John C. Stennis Strike Group and ships assigned to the Republic of Korea (ROK) Navy 1st Fleet Maritime Battle Group One steam together during Maritime Counter Special Operations Force (MCSOF) exercise, which is part of Foal Eagle 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Andre T. Richard/ Released)

WATERS SURROUNDING THE KOREAN PENINSULA (March 24, 2016) – Ships assigned to the John C. Stennis Strike Group and ships assigned to the Republic of Korea (ROK) Navy 1st Fleet Maritime Battle Group One steam together during Maritime Counter Special Operations Force (MCSOF) exercise, which is part of Foal Eagle 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Andre T. Richard/ Released)

Before coming to OPNAV, I served as the deployed commander of Carrier Strike Group 3, the John C. Stennis Strike Group (JCSSG), which included the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), Carrier Air Wing 9, Destroyer Squadron 21, the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110), USS Stockdale (DDG 106) and USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93). Our Sailors performed brilliantly, as they always do. As we sailed the waters off Korea and in the South China Sea, it hit home — we must have more offensive punch. We need longer range weapons that pace the threats in the Pacific and elsewhere. The Distributed Lethality concept has to move from concept to reality — and fast. Surface ships and those of us who to go to sea in them need to refocus our pivotal role in being able to control the sea.

So it is those recent deployment experiences, combined with my surface warfare officer experiences over the past 30 years, that have helped shape my “Top 5” investment priorities for N96:

1. Aligning Investments to Sea Control and Distributed Lethality Priorities.

Our nation has returned to an era of great power competition. We must have a Navy that can provide more options to national leaders, from non-conflict operations to high-end combat at sea. Not only must we always be prepared to protect and defend ourselves, we must also remain ready to go on the offensive at a moment’s notice. We can achieve that balance through Distributed Lethality. While we work to maintain and increase our defensive resiliency, we’re going to increase and distribute our offensive power. By increasing the number of “shooters” on our team, we will complicate the defensive needs of any potential adversary, and we will be able to act on high-quality targeting data from a variety of sources.

2. Integrating New Ships and Capabilities in the Fleet.

The Surface Force is moving out with the next generation of surface combatants that will serve our nation now and into the second half of the 21st century. These include:

The first of its class, USS Zumwault (DDG 1000) will be commissioned this October. This technologically advanced warship will provide more offensive options to joint and maritime commanders while maintaining a sleek, stealthy profile that will make it more difficult for adversaries to target.

The Arleigh Burke-class destroyer program has been providing new ships to the Navy since 1991. Over the years, we’ve added capabilities (helicopters, increased VLS lethality, improved Aegis weapon system performance, SeaRAM) without the need for a new ship program and associated delays. The next step in this continuum of modernization is the DDG Flight III with the SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar, which is capable of operating in different environments and mission requirements against a variety of potential targets and profiles. Compared to the legacy SPY-1 radar, Air and Missile Defense Radar will be able to see an airborne object half as big and twice as far — and testing is proceeding apace at Pacific Missile Range Facility, where we have radiated at full power and cycle.

The LCS program continues to provide new small surface combatants to the fleet. These warships will play a vital role in the Navy’s core function of controlling the sea for the nation. In 2030, six out of every 10 warships the nation employs forward will be LCS/FF. The fleet commander of 2030 will face a multitude of challenges while operating forward, and the LCS/FF will be a key element of future adaptive force packages and surface action groups. Our warships must be ready to respond to actions of aggression with credible combat power that will convince potential adversaries that our nation will stand in the face of challenges to international order. The investments we are making in lethality and hardening today will enable LCS/FF warships to execute that role and enable us to control the sea and project power well into the future. We will continue to make improvements along the way — and will see LCS populating the waterfront in quickly growing numbers.

In late 2015, N96 began a future surface combatant capabilities based assessment to guide development of a holistic future surface combatant shipbuilding strategy. The intent of the study was to identify capability gaps as a result of CG 47, LCS, and DDG 51 Flight IIA eventual class retirements. The results of the capabilities based assessment are expected later this year and will be used to inform an initial capabilities document, which will serve as the basis for future surface combatant programs. As this effort progresses to an analysis of alternatives in FY18 and FY19, I intend to use a set based design approach to solving design challenges. That means we will consider a set of solutions rather than focusing on any one specific solution.

3. Continuing to Pace the Threat through Modernization.

The Surface Navy can deliver advanced warfighting capability through shipbuilding and modernization. Shipbuilding enables the Navy to develop and deliver advanced warfighting capability well beyond today’s current capability, but does require significant time from concept development to delivery (15-20 years). The surface modernization strategy enables the systematic introduction of existing and emerging technologies into the in-service fleet. Through modernization, critical warfighter capability gaps can be addressed more rapidly (three to five years), and the lethality of the Surface Force can be distributed across greater ranges without additional force structure.

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (June 24, 2016) The Arleigh Burke Class guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) follows in formation with the Ticonderoga-Class guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56) during an underway replenishment with the Fleet Replenishment Oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class J. Alexander Delgado/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (June 24, 2016) The Arleigh Burke Class guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) follows in formation with the Ticonderoga-Class guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56) during an underway replenishment with the Fleet Replenishment Oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class J. Alexander Delgado/Released)

Hull mechanical and electrical as well as combat systems modernizations will continue for Arleigh Burke destroyers in FY17. All newly modernized Aegis Baseline 9C DDGs will be Integrated Air and Missile Defense ships with Navy Integrated Fire Control – Counter Air capability and the most advanced BMD capability. All new construction DDG Flight IIA ships, beginning with DDG-113, will be delivered with Aegis Baseline 9C. Additional planned warfighting capabilities include: Identification Friend or Foe Mode 5, Close-In Weapons System Block 1B, Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program Block II, and the SQQ-89A (V) 15 Integrated Undersea Warfare Combat System Suite. Delivery of these capabilities will extend into the mid-term (2020-2030) and beyond.

The cruiser modernization plan ensures long-term capability for purpose-built air defense commander platforms. The Navy intends to operate 11 CGs (CG 52-62), of which 10 have been recently modernized, while modernizing the newest 11 ships (CG 63-73). The recently modernized CGs (CG 52-62, excluding CG 61) will receive Aegis Baseline 9 through back-fit, as these ships continue to support carrier strike group operations. As the newly modernized CGs (CG 63-73) return to the fleet, each will replace the older CGs on a one for one basis. Additional planned warfighting capabilities include: Navy Integrated Fire Control – Counter Air capability, Identification Friend or Foe Mode 5, Cooperative Engagement Capability, Close-In Weapons System Block 1B, Vertical Launch System upgrades with Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile, the AN/SPQ-9B Radar Set, the MK 34 Gun Weapon System with MK 160 Gun Computer System and Electro-Optic Sight System, and the SQQ-89A (V) 15 Integrated USW Combat System Suite.

4. Keeping the Fleet Whole.

Our crews and their ships must be ready, relevant and capable. We accomplish this by adequately maintaining the current fleet, building a future force prepared to meet emerging threats, and ensuring our crews are trained and ready to fight and win. I am fully supportive of the Surface and Expeditionary Warfare Training Committee and Ready Relevant Learning investments. We’re hard at work enhancing and developing new, sophisticated curricula and support tools that will provide better training for our Sailors as they operate more complex systems in an increasingly complicated world. In terms of fleet wholeness, we must strive to maximize the impact of maintenance availabilities. Our goal must be to get each ship out of its maintenance period on-time and on-budget—our Optimized Fleet Response Plan demands it!

5. Using Innovative Approaches to Address Future Surface Warfare Challenges.

Our warfighting capability and capacity is influenced by technological innovations, national priorities, and an evolving threat. The agile use of innovation will ensure we maintain our edge despite these changes. Some of this innovation comes in the form of expanding the mission capabilities of existing technology through hardware and software upgrades as well as new tactics development. N96 is also investing in new technology, including unmanned systems, enhanced integrated fire control systems, directed energy weapons and live virtual training technology.

So there you have it – my top five investment priorities as director, Surface Warfare. I am truly excited for the opportunity to build and shape the Navy’s surface combatant forces. I am committed to those who serve our fine Navy and will work closely with other organizations that share this responsibility with me. As I continue to learn and grow in my new role, I encourage my shipmates and friends of surface warfare to help me and my staff refine these priorities over time. That will require healthy dialogue, honest feedback and frequent engagement.

Again, I look forward to the future of surface warfare and to serving the warfighters who are making great things happen every day throughout the fleet! If you are in the Pentagon, I welcome you to swing by and see the N96 team. I am proud to lead this team of professionals here at the Pentagon as we support those in the fleet!