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State of the Department of the Navy

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of the State of the Department of the Navy update.

Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer will provide an update Wednesday, May 2 in the Pentagon press briefing room about the State of the Department of the Navy; Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson and Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Robert Neller will also participate and also answer questions about their respective services.

Live video is scheduled to begin 1:30 p.m. EDT.

Join the conversation on social media using #BlueGreenTeam.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/05/02/state-of-the-department-of-the-navy/ U.S. Navy

Soundings Podcast: CNO Discusses Ownership in Naval Profession

Moderator: Welcome to Soundings, the official podcast of the Chief of Naval Operations. On this podcast we have discussed each of the four core attributes: accountability, initiative, integrity and toughness. Today, we talk with Adm. Richardson about ownership in our Navy.

Sir, let’s start by simply asking how you think about ownership as it applies to our naval profession.

Adm. Richardson: To me, ownership is absolutely critical to our business. No matter where you are in the Navy, no matter what your job, no matter what your seniority, we need 100 percent ownership of what we do, what we’re doing. We need to own our behaviors, we need to own our technical competence, we need to own our character.

U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (Nov. 24, 2016) Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson inspects a sample fuel with Petty Officer 2nd Class Trenton Isabel in the fuel lab aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Rawad Madanat/Released)
U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (Nov. 24, 2016) Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson inspects a sample fuel with Petty Officer 2nd Class Trenton Isabel in the fuel lab aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Rawad Madanat/Released)

 

So in my mind, ownership is composed of four different things. One is, you’ve got to have the right level of knowledge. You need to know what you’re doing, right? And this is this technical competence that we talk about in the leader development framework. If we don’t know what we’re doing, if we don’t know how to do our job, then we’re never going to know when things are going wrong, when to step in and intervene. And so there’s a really important role for just level of knowledge and knowing our business.

The second thing is that we’ve got to have responsibility for executing our jobs. You’ve got to be responsible for the mission that you’re given. You have to feel that responsibility to get that mission done. Not just to get it done, but to get it done properly and get it done consistently with the standards of the job and the standards of the Navy. So you’ve got to feel that responsibility.

BAB EL MANDEB STRAIT (Oct. 2, 2017) Operations Specialist 3rd Class Jasmine Chavis, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), mans a radar terminal in the combat information center. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Vance Hand/Released)
BAB EL MANDEB STRAIT (Oct. 2, 2017) Operations Specialist 3rd Class Jasmine Chavis, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), mans a radar terminal in the combat information center. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Vance Hand/Released)

Know that we have accountability for that mission. So in addition to feeling responsible, you have to know that we’ll all be held accountable for achieving that mission. Whatever that may be. It might be just a specific task, it might be to execute something much bigger, but at the end of the day we will be held accountable for executing and delivering what we needed to deliver.

And then finally, and perhaps most importantly, we must be given the authority to do what we need to do. It’s very frustrating for someone to be given a task and told hey, you’re going to be held accountable for that and you’re responsible for that, but you’re not given the authority to go and do it. Right? So they have to come back and ask permission or something.

This requires a careful discussion between a senior commander and a subordinate commander or the boss and the person given the job so that there’s a good understanding of exactly what is required. And then we can competently delegate, and delegate the authority to be able to execute that mission consistent with responsibility, consistent with accountability and relying on, you know, full technical knowledge of what needs to be done.

So that’s how I see ownership. It’s got four ingredients: technical knowledge, it’s got responsibility, it’s got accountability, and finally it has authority. If you don’t have all four of those things it’s impossible to fully own what we do.

Moderator: Sir, in talking about ownership, I know this is a concept that applies to every Sailor, whether they be an admiral or a seaman, but how would you explain that to encourage Sailors at any and every level in the Navy chain of command to take the concept of ownership on board?

ATLANTIC OCEAN (April 12, 2017) Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Addam Parker, from Virginia Beach, Va., conducts an inspection of an engine in the jet shop of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Andrew J. Sneeringer/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (April 12, 2017) Aviation Machinist’s Mate 3rd Class Addam Parker, from Virginia Beach, Va., conducts an inspection of an engine in the jet shop of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Andrew J. Sneeringer/Released)

Adm. Richardson: The thing that will make us as powerful a Navy as we can possibly be is not saying hey, you own it. This is something that belongs to you. But internalizing that we all have ownership. This is the difference between a globally powerful, a superior Navy and just, you know, any other Navy.

So to the degree that each one of us takes ownership and executes our mission, we become as a Navy much more powerful.

Imagine, if you will, if every Sailor came to work every day wanting to own and tackle their job. You combine this with some of the fast learning things. Hey, I want to improve the way I do my business every single day because I truly own this thing and I’m going to get better at it every single day. Imagine what our Navy could achieve if every one of our sailors and civilians came in with that attitude. Every single day on every single job.

Moderator: Well, Sir, how do you see the way forward for getting us to that point and instilling ownership in all our Sailors?

Adm. Richardson: That’s why we have these discussions. A lot of this has to come from inside. We can only go so far with an extrinsic or an outside motivating structure of reward and punishment or whatever. To truly achieve our theoretical limits of performance, it’s got to come from within each one of us. We have to identify and dedicate ourselves, push ourselves not to achieve the bare minimum, but to go well past that bare minimum and really try and maximize our performance.

ARABIAN GULF (Aug. 8, 2017) Sailors share a laugh on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) in the Arabian Gulf while deployed in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. While in this region, the ship and its carrier strike group conducted maritime security operations to reassure allies and partners, preserve freedom of navigation, and maintain the free flow of commerce. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ian Kinkead/Released)
ARABIAN GULF (Aug. 8, 2017) Sailors share a laugh on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) in the Arabian Gulf while deployed in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. While in this region, the ship and its carrier strike group conducted maritime security operations to reassure allies and partners, preserve freedom of navigation, and maintain the free flow of commerce. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ian Kinkead/Released)

 

No rule set is going to stimulate that. It’s got to come from within each one of us. And so I’d ask that everybody on the Navy team think about that motivation. Do you feel that fire in your belly to come in and do everything you can to own your job and do it better today than you’ve ever done it before? If not, why not? That’s a conversation that you can have with your leadership, but a very important part of that is the conversation we all need to have with ourselves.

Moderator: This has been Soundings, the official podcast of the CNO.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/10/05/soundings-podcast-cno-discusses-ownership-in-naval-profession/ U.S. Navy

Statements by SECNAV Richard V. Spencer and CNO Adm. John Richardson on Las Vegas Mass Shooting

Today, President Donald J. Trump ordered that the U.S. flag be flown at half-staff until sunset on Oct. 6 as a remark of response for the victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, Oct. 1.

Both Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer and Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson posted the below statements on their Facebook pages.

Statement by Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer

“My thoughts and prayers are with the victims and loved ones affected by the tragedy in Las Vegas. The U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps team stand united against senseless acts of violence and our thoughts are with those in need today. Thank you to the first responders and medical staff, whose quick actions saved additional lives.”

 

Statement by Chief of Naval Operations John Richardson

“Dana and I are praying for the victims and families of the awful Las Vegas shooting. The Navy team stands with the people of Las Vegas against this heinous act of senseless violence.”

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/10/02/statements-by-secnav-richard-v-spencer-and-cno-adm-john-richardson-on-las-vegas-mass-shooting/ U.S. Navy

USS Illinois Joins U.S. Navy’s Silent Service

Our newest Virginia class submarine, USS Illinois (SSN 786), joined our fleet when it was commissioned Oct. 29 at Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, Connecticut.

Platforms Matter: USS Illinois is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface warfare; delivery of special operations forces; strike warfare; irregular warfare; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and mine warfare.The submarine is 377 feet long, has a 34-foot beam, and will be able to dive to depths greater than 800 feet and operate at speeds in excess of 25 knots submerged. It will operate for over 30 years without ever refueling.  
Block III: SSN-786 is the third of eight Block III Virginia-class submarines to be built. The Block III submarines are built with new Virginia Payload Tubes designed to lower costs and increase missile-firing payload possibilities. The first 10 Block I and Block II Virginia-class submarines have 12 individual 21-inch diameter vertical launch tubes able to fire Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles (TLAMS). The Block III submarines are built with two-larger 87-inch diameter tubes able to house six TLAMS each.

 

Experience the ceremony below that was attended by more than 2,500 people and learn these five things you need to  know about the boat.

GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) A color guard stands ready to parade the colors during the commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois (SSN 786) on Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) A color guard stands ready to parade the colors during the commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois (SSN 786) on Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) First Lady Michelle Obama, ship sponsor of USS Illinois (SSN 786), arrives at the commissioning ceremony on Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) First Lady Michelle Obama, ship sponsor of USS Illinois (SSN 786), arrives at the commissioning ceremony on Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson delivers the principal address at the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest fast attack submarine, USS Illinois (SSN 786) at Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Elliott Fabrizio/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson delivers the principal address at the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest fast attack submarine, USS Illinois (SSN 786) at Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Elliott Fabrizio/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) First Lady Michelle Obama announces "Bring the Ship to Life" spurring its crew members to race across the brow and fall in formation aboard USS Illinois (SSN 786) during the commissioning ceremony on Naval Submarine Base New London (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) First Lady Michelle Obama announces “Bring the Ship to Life” spurring its crew members to race across the brow and fall in formation aboard USS Illinois (SSN 786) during the commissioning ceremony on Naval Submarine Base New London (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) Sailors assigned to USS Illinois (SSN 786) raise the national ensign aboard USS Illinois during its commissioning ceremony on Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) Sailors assigned to USS Illinois (SSN 786) raise the national ensign aboard USS Illinois during its commissioning ceremony on Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) The first watch stands ready to assume the duty aboard USS Illinois (SSN 786) on Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) The first watch stands ready to assume the duty aboard USS Illinois (SSN 786) on Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) Cmdr. Jesse Porter, commanding officer of USS Illinois (SSN 786), offers remarks at the commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois on Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) Cmdr. Jesse Porter, commanding officer of USS Illinois (SSN 786), offers remarks at the commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois on Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)

“The Illinois has joined the fleet. The crew of Illinois has assumed our watch-a watch that will continue for the next 30 years-always waiting for the call, always ready.”
– Cmdr. Jesse Porter
Commanding officer, USS Illinois (SSN 786)

GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) Guests attend the commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois (SSN 786) on Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) Guests attend the commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois (SSN 786) on Naval Submarine Base New London. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
161029-N-HI707-974 GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) A guest dressed as Abraham Lincoln attend the commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois (SSN 786) and shakes hands of the crew on Naval Submarine Base New London, Oct. 29. USS Illinois is the U.S. NavyÕs 13th Virginia-Class attack submarine and the fourth ship named for the State of Illinois. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)
161029-N-HI707-974
GROTON, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2016) A guest dressed as Abraham Lincoln attend the commissioning ceremony of USS Illinois (SSN 786) and shakes hands of the crew on Naval Submarine Base New London, Oct. 29. USS Illinois is the U.S. NavyÕs 13th Virginia-Class attack submarine and the fourth ship named for the State of Illinois. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Darryl I. Wood/Released)

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/10/29/uss-illinois-joins-u-s-navys-silent-service/ Jason Kelly

USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) Joins the U.S. Navy’s Fleet

Our newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) joined the U.S. Navy’s fleet when it was commissioned into active service Oct. 15 in Baltimore, Maryland.

The Innovative Ship. Zumwalt, the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers, features a state-of-the-art electric propulsion system, wave-piercing tumblehome hull, stealth design, and the latest warfighting technology and weaponry available. The Zumwalt-class destroyer will be capable of performing a range of deterrence, power projection, sea control, and command and control missions while allowing the Navy to evolve with new systems and missions.
The Innovator. DDG-1000 honors an innovative leader in our Navy’s history, embodies the legacy of warfighting excellence and innovation of Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., a veteran of World War II and the conflicts in Korea and Vietnam. He exemplified honor, courage and commitment during 32 years of dedicated naval service. Believing it was his job to “modernize and humanize” the Navy, Zumwalt chose to embrace change and to lead it from within. 

 

“On behalf of the U.S. Naval Surface Force, I proudly accept ownership of the Navy’s newest ship to the fleet.”
– Vice Adm. Tom Rowden
Commander, Naval Surface Forces

U.S. Navy photos by Petty Officer 1st Class Nathan Laird

The Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is moored to the pier during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
The Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is moored to the pier during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
The color guard prepares to parade the colors during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
The color guard prepares to parade the colors during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
(Left to right) Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) Sean Stackley, Commander, U.S. Pacific Command(PACOM) Adm. Harry Harris, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson and Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus render honors for the national anthem during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
(Left to right) Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) Sean Stackley, Commander, U.S. Pacific Command(PACOM) Adm. Harry Harris, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson and Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus render honors for the national anthem during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
(Left to right) Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus and U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland render honors for the national anthem during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
(Left to right) Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus and U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland render honors for the national anthem during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) Sean Stackley delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) Sean Stackley delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson introduces Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson introduces Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
The iconic Brewer's Hill neighborhood of Baltimore can be seen in the background as Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
The iconic Brewer’s Hill neighborhood of Baltimore can be seen in the background as Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus delivers remarks during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
The national ensign and commissioning pennant fly over the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
The national ensign and commissioning pennant fly over the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
The crew of the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), brings the ship to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
The crew of the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), brings the ship to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Balloons fly and the crowd applauds as the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is brought to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Balloons fly and the crowd applauds as the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is brought to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Capt. James Kirk, commanding officer of the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), delivers remarks during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Capt. James Kirk, commanding officer of the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), delivers remarks during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
The crew of the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), brings the ship to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
The crew of the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), brings the ship to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Balloons fly and the crowd applauds as the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is brought to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Balloons fly and the crowd applauds as the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is brought to life during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore.
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson conducts a media interview during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
161015-N-AT895-508 BALTIMORE, (Oct. 15, 2016) Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson conducts a media interview during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Nathan Laird/Released)
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson conducts a media interview during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson conducts a media interview during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson talks with Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Steven Giordano during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson talks with Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Steven Giordano during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000).

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/10/16/uss-zumwalt-ddg-1000-joins-the-u-s-navys-fleet/ Jason Kelly