Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.

GULF OF ADEN: An eleven-meter rigid hull inflatable boat, assigned to amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4), maneuvers during small boat operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brian Caracci/Released)

GULF OF ADEN: An eleven-meter rigid hull inflatable boat, assigned to amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4), maneuvers during small boat operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brian Caracci/Released)

MANILA, Philippines: USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) sits at anchor off the coast of Manila during a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mike Pernick/Released)

MANILA, Philippines: USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) sits at anchor off the coast of Manila during a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mike Pernick/Released)

GULF OF OMAN: Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Felix Rivera operates a forklift on the flight deck of aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jordan Twiss/Released)

GULF OF OMAN: Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Felix Rivera operates a forklift on the flight deck of aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jordan Twiss/Released)

SOUDA BAY, Greece: A Sailor heaves a mooring line ashore as the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Gravely (DDG 107) arrives in Souda Bay, Greece for a port visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Heather Judkins/Released)

SOUDA BAY, Greece: A Sailor heaves a mooring line ashore as the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Gravely (DDG 107) arrives in Souda Bay, Greece for a port visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Heather Judkins/Released)

BALTIC SEA: Members of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 8 prepare to deploy EOD divers to conduct search operations for ordnance while in support of Open Spirit 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd class Jared E. Walker/Released)

BALTIC SEA: Members of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 8 prepare to deploy EOD divers to conduct search operations for ordnance while in support of Open Spirit 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd class Jared E. Walker/Released)

PANAMA CANAL: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen (DDG 82) transits the Panama Canal as she heads to the Caribbean Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Huey D. Younger Jr./Released)

PANAMA CANAL: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen (DDG 82) transits the Panama Canal as she heads to the Caribbean Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Huey D. Younger Jr./Released)

ROTA, Spain: USS Porter (DDG 78) moored in Rota, Spain for a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)

ROTA, Spain: USS Porter (DDG 78) moored in Rota, Spain for a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)

HONIARA, Guadalcanal: The guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111) prepares to anchor off the coast during a scheduled refueling stop. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Will Gaskill/Released)

HONIARA, Guadalcanal: The guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111) prepares to anchor off the coast during a scheduled refueling stop. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Will Gaskill/Released)

GULF OF AQABA: The dock landing ship USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49) conducts amphibious operations off the coast of Jordan. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Zachary Eshleman/Released)

GULF OF AQABA: The dock landing ship USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49) conducts amphibious operations off the coast of Jordan. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Zachary Eshleman/Released)

GULF OF ADEN: A MK 45 5-inch gun fires during a live-fire exercise aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Gonzalez (DDG 66). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Pasquale Sena/Released)

GULF OF ADEN: A MK 45 5-inch gun fires during a live-fire exercise aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Gonzalez (DDG 66). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Pasquale Sena/Released)

NAVAL BASE GUAM: The guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111) prepares to moor pierside with the assistance of a tug boat, Naval Base Guam.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Will Gaskill/Released)

NAVAL BASE GUAM: The guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111) prepares to moor pierside with the assistance of a tug boat, Naval Base Guam. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Will Gaskill/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !

 

The Air Force’s top enlisted leader addressed the new enlisted performance report and gave insight to feedback he’s received during his latest edition of CHIEFchat at the Defense Media Activity on Fort George G. Meade. Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James A. Cody encouraged Airmen to forget about the old EPR system and to embrace the new.

The Weekly Wire Rundown is a weekly video blog from the Office of the Chief of Naval Personnel, highlighting the top stories affecting Sailors and their families. The video compliments the print edition of the @USNPeople Weekly Wire, which you can subscribe to by e-mailing usnpeople@gmail.com. It can also be downloaded at www.navy.mil/cnp. We welcome any question and feedback on personnel matters or how to make this product better serve Sailors and their families.

Watch and let us know what you think in the comments below.

By Vice Adm. Robert Burke
Chief of Naval Personnel

For more than 240 years, the U.S. Navy has served as America’s first line of defense, strategic deterrent, and protector of trade across the world’s oceans. Our role in safeguarding freedom of the seas has never been more relevant.  From the South China Sea to our Pacific shores, from the Arabian Gulf to the Eastern Atlantic, there is no shortage of headlines about the challenges we face, making the U.S. Navy’s presence in waters around the world an imperative.  We are a busy force that operates with a clear purpose in an uncertain time.

U.S. Air Force Airman First Class Jonathan Eng, left and Milton Eng, right, pin the shoulder boards on newly commissioned Navy Ensigns Alison Eng, center, after she is commissioned into the U.S. Navy from the U.S. Naval Academy at the end of her graduation and commissioning ceremony May 27 at the Navy-Marine Corp Memorial Stadium.

U.S. Air Force Airman First Class Jonathan Eng, left and Milton Eng, right, pin the shoulder boards on newly commissioned Navy Ensigns Alison Eng, center, after she is commissioned into the U.S. Navy from the U.S. Naval Academy at the end of her graduation and commissioning ceremony May 27 at the Navy-Marine Corp Memorial Stadium.

 

There is no doubt that we are in the midst of a challenging operational and fiscal environment, but I am both excited and honored to be your new Chief of Naval Personnel, and continue the work that Adm. Bill Moran started.

Today more than ever, people want to be part of something that matters.  They want to serve, they want a purpose, and they want a mission.  And while the Navy is in a very good position today with recruiting, retention and fleet manning, we are at a strategic cross-roads, which is causing us to re-think how we will recruit, train and retain the force of tomorrow.

Toward that end, our team at the Bureau is overhauling the Navy’s entire personnel system, and we are focused on empowering Sailors, modernizing policies and operating systems, and providing the right training at the right time to our force.

We call that effort Sailor 2025.

d. (May 27, 2016) – U.S. Air Force Airman First Class Jonathan Eng, left, renders the first salute to his newly commissioned Navy officer sister, Ensign Alison Eng, right, after she is commissioned into the U.S. Navy, at the end of her graduation and commissioning ceremony May 27 at the Navy-Marine Corp Memorial Stadium.

d. (May 27, 2016) – U.S. Air Force Airman First Class Jonathan Eng, left, renders the first salute to his newly commissioned Navy officer sister, Ensign Alison Eng, right, after she is commissioned into the U.S. Navy, at the end of her graduation and commissioning ceremony May 27 at the Navy-Marine Corp Memorial Stadium.

 

There are many reasons to pay close attention to potential challenges that could affect us, including an unpredictable economy, a declining veteran population, growing competition for high-tech skills, and personnel costs that account for more than 50 percent of the Navy’s budget.

Without changing how we operate today, we risk being unprepared for the future.  And unless we upgrade the Navy’s analytic tools and supporting infrastructure now, we will find ourselves near shoal water when the seas begin to get heavy.

The 40+ personnel initiatives that comprise Sailor 2025 are aimed at empowering COs, having flexible policies, better tools, and more choices for those who might otherwise not join the Navy or who might consider leaving.  We are modernizing how Sailors manage their careers, pay and personnel issues, and how we attract new recruits to join our force.  Some of these initiatives include looking at our performance evaluation and career management systems, increased graduate education opportunities, tours with industry, career intermission program, expanded Child Development Center and fitness center hours, along with many others.  And we will do this all with the underlying principle that Sailors’ work-life balance and health and wellness must be improved.

Adm. Moran knew that we were long overdue for a change, and set us on a course for change.

Newly commissioned Navy Ensigns and Marine 2nd Lieutenants from the U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2016 throw their midshipmen covers in the air at the end of their graduation and commissioning ceremony May 27 at the Navy-Marine Corp Memorial Stadium.

Newly commissioned Navy Ensigns and Marine 2nd Lieutenants from the U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2016 throw their midshipmen covers in the air at the end of their graduation and commissioning ceremony May 27 at the Navy-Marine Corp Memorial Stadium.

 

I am committed to see us through that voyage, and will continue put polices in place that further enhance trust, balance and stability throughout the Fleet.

Our Navy today has the best Sailors we’ve ever seen.  We aim to keep it that way.

                  The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, unaccounted for since World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.                  Marine Pfc. James B. Johnson of Poughkeepsie, New York, will be buried May 31 in
The Department of Defense announced today the death of a sailor who was supporting Operation Inherent Resolve.Gunner’s Mate Seaman Connor Alan McQuagge, 19, of Utah, died May 26 of a non-combat related injury while underway in the Red Sea. The incident is under investigation.He was assigned to USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49), forward deployed in the
 Military commissions are part of our system of military justice.  The Department of Defense, and we personally, are committed to fairness and transparency in military commission proceedings, and to the independence of the judges who oversee them.   Our comments and those made by other senior officials regarding gender-neutral staffing of guard
An Army systems engineer brought more than 80 Airmen, Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and civilians from around the National Capital Region together May 24-26 to raise 675 American flags at the Pentagon in honor of Memorial Day.

This week's photos feature Airmen from around the globe involved in activities supporting expeditionary operations and defending America. This weekly feature showcases the men and women of the Air Force.

Maj. Jack Nelson, a U-2 pilot, received the 2015 Koren Kolligian Jr. Trophy during a ceremony May 25 at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., for his efforts in avoiding a flight mishap.