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Category Archives: Christenings & Commissionings

USS Indianapolis (LCS 17) Commissioning Ceremony

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of USS Indianapolis’ (LCS 17) commissioning ceremony.

Live video from the Oct. 26 ceremony in Burns Harbor, Indiana, is scheduled to begin 10 a.m. local time (CDT).

The Freedom-variant littoral combat ship (LCS) is a fast, agile, focused-mission platform designed for operation in near-shore environments as well as open-ocean operation. It is designed to defeat asymmetric “anti-access” threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft.

Lisa W. Hershman, deputy chief management officer for the Department of Defense, will deliver the principal address. Jill Donnelly, wife of former U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly of Indiana, is the ship’s sponsor. The ceremony will be highlighted by a time-honored Navy tradition when Donnelly gives the first order to “man our ship and bring her to life!”

“This Freedom-variant littoral combat ship will continue the proud legacy created by ships previously bearing the name Indianapolis,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “The crew will carry on the tradition of service to confront the many challenges of today’s complex world. To the men and women who will ring in the first watch, you carry with you the fighting spirit of incredible bravery and sense of duty that is inherently recognized with the name Indianapolis.”

The LCS class consists of two variants, the Freedom variant and the Independence variant, designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered hulls). The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS 6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls).

The future USS Indianapolis (LCS 17) is launched April 18 in Wisconsin.

Media may direct queries to the Navy Office of Information at (703) 697-5342. For more information about the Littoral Combat Ship class: http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_display.asp?cid=4200&tid=1650&ct=4

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/10/25/uss-indianapolis-lcs-17-commissioning-ceremony/ tjones

USS Indianapolis (LCS 17) Commissioning Ceremony

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of USS Indianapolis’ (LCS 17) commissioning ceremony.

Live video from the Oct. 26 ceremony in Burns Harbor, Indiana, is scheduled to begin 10 a.m. local time (CDT).

The Freedom-variant littoral combat ship (LCS) is a fast, agile, focused-mission platform designed for operation in near-shore environments as well as open-ocean operation. It is designed to defeat asymmetric “anti-access” threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft.

Lisa W. Hershman, deputy chief management officer for the Department of Defense, will deliver the principal address. Jill Donnelly, wife of former U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly of Indiana, is the ship’s sponsor. The ceremony will be highlighted by a time-honored Navy tradition when Donnelly gives the first order to “man our ship and bring her to life!”

“This Freedom-variant littoral combat ship will continue the proud legacy created by ships previously bearing the name Indianapolis,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “The crew will carry on the tradition of service to confront the many challenges of today’s complex world. To the men and women who will ring in the first watch, you carry with you the fighting spirit of incredible bravery and sense of duty that is inherently recognized with the name Indianapolis.”

The LCS class consists of two variants, the Freedom variant and the Independence variant, designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered hulls). The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS 6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls).

The future USS Indianapolis (LCS 17) is launched April 18 in Wisconsin.

Media may direct queries to the Navy Office of Information at (703) 697-5342. For more information about the Littoral Combat Ship class: http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_display.asp?cid=4200&tid=1650&ct=4

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/10/25/uss-indianapolis-lcs-17-commissioning-ceremony/ tjones

USS Cincinnati (LCS 20) Commissioning

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of USS Cincinnati (LCS 20)’s commissioning ceremony.

The principal speaker will be Rep. Brad Wenstrup of Ohio. Former Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker will serve as the ship’s sponsor. Senior military representative at the ceremony will be Adm. James Foggo III, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa and commander, Allied Joint Force Command Naples, Italy.

The future USS Cincinnati is the fifth U.S. Navy ship to honor Ohio’s third largest city.

Live video of the Oct. 5 ceremony on the west pier in Gulfport, Mississippi, is scheduled to begin 10 a.m. (CDT).

Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) is a fast, agile, mission-focused platform designed for operation in near-shore environments yet capable of open-ocean operation. It is designed to defeat asymmetric “anti-access” threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft.

An interchangeable mission package is embarked on each LCS and provides the primary mission systems in one of these warfare areas. Using an open architecture design, modular weapons, sensor systems and a variety of manned and unmanned vehicles to gain, sustain and exploit littoral maritime supremacy, LCS provides U.S. joint force access to critical areas in multiple theaters.

Initiated in February 2002, the LCS program represents a reduction in time to acquire, design and build ships in comparison to any previous ship class. Currently, a total of 33 LCS are planned: 16 ships have been delivered (LCS 1-14, 16 and 18); 10 additional LCS are under various stages of construction and three are in the pre-construction phase.

CINCINNATI, Ohio (March 28, 2019) Crew members of the future USS Cincinnati (LCS 20) engage the crowd during a namesake visit to Cincinnati, Ohio while riding atop a float made to look like the ship. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Heidi Cheek/Released)
CINCINNATI (March 28, 2019) Cmdr. Kurt Braeckel, commanding officer of the future littoral combat ship USS Cincinnati (LCS 20), greets two young children during the 100th Findlay Market Opening Day Parade. Braeckel and other USS Cincinnati crew members were in the city as a part of a namesake visit by the ship’s crew. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Aubrey Page/Released)

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/10/04/uss-cincinnati-lcs-20-commissioning/ poyrazdogany

USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) Commissioning

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of the Jan. 26 commissioning of the Navy’s newest destroyer, USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001).

Live video from Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, where the ship will be homeported is scheduled to begin 1 p.m. (EST) / 10 a.m. (PST).

The second ship in the Zumwalt-class of destroyers, DDG-1001 is named in honor of Medal of Honor recipient Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor, who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions in Ramadi, Iraq, Sept. 29, 2006.

Read more about Monsoor’s action on All Hands Magazine.

“USS Michael Monsoor is one of the most capable warfighting assets our nation has to offer. This ship will provide independent forward presence and deterrence for decades to come and I am confident the crew will operate this vessel with the level of expertise, courage and strength needed to overcome any challenge.”
– Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer

Scott Peters, U.S. representative from California’s 52nd District, will deliver the commissioning ceremony’s principal address. Sally Monsoor, Petty Officer Monsoor’s mother, will serve as the ship’s sponsor. The ceremony will be highlighted by a time-honored Navy tradition when she will give the first order to “man our ship and bring her to life!”

SAN DIEGO (Dec. 7, 2018) The guided-missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) transits San Diego Bay. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jasen Moreno-Garcia/Released
SAN DIEGO (Dec. 7, 2018) The guided-missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) transits San Diego Bay. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jasen Moreno-Garcia/Released

 

The future USS Michael Monsoor includes new technologies and will serve as a multi-mission platform capable of operating as an integral part of naval, joint or combined maritime forces.

The Zumwalt-class fields a considerably larger flight deck and has capacity for two MH-60R and three VTUAVs to execute a wider array of surface, aviation, and undersea missions that deliver more manpower, firepower, and computing power to the fight. The future USS Michael Monsoor’s Vertical Launch System (VLS) features cells physically larger than similar cells on today’s ships, allowing this class to fire larger and more advanced land and anti-ship missiles in the future.

Follow the conversation on Twitter using #USSMichaelMonsoor.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/01/23/uss-michael-monsoor-ddg-1001-commissioning/ U.S. Navy

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

Damage Controlman Fireman Kenneth Rios uses a naval infrared firefighting thermal imager to detect hot spots from a simulated fire during a general quarters drill aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) in the Mediterranean Sea, Dec. 29, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Turner/Released)
Sailors spray water on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael Hogan/Released)
Lt. Cmdr. Michele Allen discusses upcoming events at Naval Branch Health Clinic Bahrain with Capt. Darren Guenther, commanding officer of Naval Support Activity (NSA) Bahrain, during his bi-weekly morning show on Armed Forces Network radio. (U.S. Navy photo by Paulina Kosturos Khoury/Released)
Aviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class Bela Belableck, left, from Anjake, Cameroon, and Aviation Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Shawn Tyner, from Debary, Florida, review inspection criteria for an MH-60S Knight Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 14 in the hangar bay aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) in the Arabian Gulf, Jan. 2, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Skyler Okerman/Released)
A Sailor observes flight operations on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) in the Arabian Gulf, Dec. 29, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Joshua L. Leonard/Released)
Electrician’s Mate Fireman Sierra Hogard adjusts the rotations per minute of the ship’s shaft in the aft main machinery room of the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryre Arciaga/Released)
Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Jared Clarke, left, from Swedesboro, New Jersey, and Aviation Structural Mechanic Airman Noah Sadler, from Greensboro, North Carolina, drill pilot holes in a chaff bucket for an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 14 aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) in the Arabian Gulf, Jan. 1, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jake Greenberg/Released)
Ensign Lauren Larar writes the new years deck log entry while underway aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS McCampbell (DDG 85). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class John Harris/Released)
Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Brenda Rivera stands safety observer duties during sea and anchor detail aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) while arriving in Aksaz, Turkey, Jan 1, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Turner/Released)
Damage Controlman Fireman Christian Delacruz looks through a port hole to main machinery room one during a general quarters drill aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) transits the Mediterranean Sea, Dec. 29, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Turner/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/01/04/faces-of-the-fleet-287/ ltall

USS Thomas Hudner (DDG 116) Commissioning Ceremony

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of the December 1 commissioning of the Navy’s newest guided-missile destroyer, USS Thomas Hudner (DDG 116).

Live video from Flynn Cruiseport in Boston is scheduled to begin 10 a.m. (EST).

Lt. j.g. Thomas Hudner is pictured wearing the Medal of Honor, Nov. 29, 1951. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
Lt. j.g. Thomas Hudner is pictured wearing the Medal of Honor, Nov. 29, 1951. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

The future USS Thomas Hudner honors naval aviator and Medal of Honor recipient Capt. Thomas J. Hudner Jr. President Harry S. Truman awarded the Medal of Honor to Hudner April 13, 1951, who displayed “conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity” for attempting to save the life of his squadron mate, Ens. Jesse L. Brown, in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War. Although Brown perished in the incident, Hudner survived the war and retired from the Navy after 26 years of service. He passed away Nov. 13, 2017, at the age of 93 and was interred with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery, April 4, 2018. This will be the first U.S. Navy ship to bear the name Thomas Hudner.

“The commissioning of USS Thomas Hudner continues a spirit of faithful service that Thomas Hudner embodied throughout his life, and his legacy will live on in those who serve aboard this ship.”
– Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker will deliver the ceremony’s principal address. The ship’s sponsors are Georgea Hudner, widow of Capt. Thomas Hudner, and Barbara Miller, wife of retired Vice Adm. Michael Miller, former superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy. In a time-honored Navy tradition, they will give the order to “man our ship and bring her to life!”

BATH, Maine (March 28, 2018) The future guided-missile destroyer USS Thomas Hudner (DDG 116) commences builder's trials. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
BATH, Maine (March 28, 2018) The future guided-missile destroyer USS Thomas Hudner (DDG Theme Options116) commences builder’s trials. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

 

The future USS Thomas Hudner will be the 66th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer. The ship will be able to conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection. Thomas Hudner will be capable of engaging in air, surface and subsurface battles simultaneously and will contain a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime warfare, including Integrated Air and Missile Defense capabilities.

USS Thomas Hudner will be homeported at Naval Station Mayport, Florida.

Follow the conversation on Twitter using #USSThomasHudner.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/11/28/uss-thomas-hudner-ddg-116-commissioning-ceremony/ U.S. Navy

USS Manchester (LCS 14) Commissioning

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of the May 26 commissioning of the Navy’s newest Independence-variant littoral combat ship, USS Manchester (LCS 14).

Adm. William Moran, vice chief of Naval Operations, will deliver the ceremony’s principal address. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, senior United States Senator from New Hampshire, will serve as the ship’s sponsor. In a time-honored Navy tradition, she will give the order to, “man our ship and bring her to life!”

Live video from the State Pier in Portsmouth, New Hampshire is scheduled to begin 10 a.m. EDT.

The future USS Manchester, designated LCS-14, is the twelfth littoral combat ship to enter the fleet and the seventh of the Independence-variant design. The ship is the second naval vessel to honor New Hampshire’s largest city. The first, a light cruiser, was commissioned Oct. 29, 1946. During nearly 10 years of commissioned service, the ship completed numerous deployments, including three combat deployments in support of operations in the Korean conflict during which she earned nine battle stars. The ship was decommissioned June 27, 1956, and stricken from the Navy list April 1, 1960.

LCS is a modular, reconfigurable ship, designed to meet validated fleet requirements for surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare and mine countermeasures missions in the littoral region. An interchangeable mission package is embarked on each LCS and provides the primary mission systems in one of these warfare areas. Using an open architecture design, modular weapons, sensor systems, and a variety of manned and unmanned vehicles to gain, sustain and exploit littoral maritime supremacy, LCS provides U.S. joint force access to critical areas in multiple theaters.

The LCS-class consists of the Freedom-variant and Independence-variant, designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom-variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered ships). The Independence-variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and follow-on even-numbered ships). Twenty-nine LCS ships have been awarded to date: 13 have been delivered to the Navy, another 13 are in various stages of construction and testing, and three are in pre-production states.

Follow the conversation on social media using #USSManchester.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/05/26/uss-manchester-lcs-14-commissioning/ U.S. Navy

USS Omaha (LCS 12) Commissioning

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of USS Omaha (LCS 12)’s commissioning ceremony.

Live video of the Feb. 3 ceremony at Broadway pier in San Diego is scheduled to begin 3 p.m. (EST)/ noon (PST).

The ship is the 11th littoral combat ship to enter the fleet and the sixth of the Independence-variant design. It is the fourth warship named for the Nebraska city. The first ship was a propeller-driven sloop-of-war. The second ship was a light cruiser and the third Omaha was an attack submarine.

Former U.S. Senator from Nebraska, 35th governor of Nebraska and Medal of Honor recipient, the Honorable Bob Kerrey will deliver the ceremony’s principal address. Susie Buffett, an Omaha philanthropist and daughter of Warren Buffett, chairman and chief executive of Berkshire Hathaway Inc., will serve as the ship’s sponsor. In a time-honored Navy tradition, she will give the order to, “man our ship and bring her to life!”

MOBILE, Ala. (May 10, 2017) The future littoral combat ship USS Omaha (LCS 12) returns to the Austal USA shipyard after successfully conducting acceptance trials. The trials consisted of a series of graded in-port and underway demonstrations for the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Austal USA/Released)
MOBILE, Ala. (May 10, 2017) The future littoral combat ship USS Omaha (LCS 12) returns to the Austal USA shipyard after successfully conducting acceptance trials. The trials consisted of a series of graded in-port and underway demonstrations for the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Austal USA/Released)

 

LCS is a modular, reconfigurable ship, designed to meet validated fleet requirements for surface warfare (SUW), anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and mine countermeasures (MCM) missions in the littoral region. An interchangeable mission package is embarked on each LCS and provides the primary mission systems in one of these warfare areas. Using an open architecture design, modular weapons, sensor systems and a variety of manned and unmanned vehicles to gain, sustain and exploit littoral maritime supremacy, LCS provides U.S. joint force access to critical areas in multiple theaters.

The LCS-class consists of the Freedom-variant and Independence-variant, designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom-variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered ships, e.g. LCS 1). The Independence-variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS 6 and follow-on even-numbered ships). Twenty-nine LCS ships have been awarded to date: 11 have been delivered to the Navy, 15 are in various stages of construction and three are in pre-production states.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/02/02/uss-omaha-lcs-12-commissioning/ U.S. Navy

Tripoli: Then and Now

By Capt. Kevin P. Meyers
Commanding officer, PCU Tripoli

Having just passed the 30-year mark of service to this great Navy, I have seen quite a bit of history and experienced many memorable events. There are moments which give you pause, due to their timelessness and their place in our Navy’s heritage. The christening of a ship, for me, is one of them.

I recently had the honor to attend the christening of the future USS Tripoli (LHA 7) in Pascagoula, Mississippi. Tripoli’s sponsor, Lynne Mabus, wife of our 75th Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, deftly shattered the bottle of sparkling wine across the ship’s bow. Those in attendance or who watched the video of the event know that was a “home run” swing if there ever was one.

PASCAGOULA, Miss. (Sept. 16, 2017) Ship's sponsor Lynne Mabus, smashes a bottle of sparkling wine against the bow of the future amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA 7) during the ship's christening ceremony. Also pictured, left to right, are Rep. Steven Palazzo, R-Miss.; Capt. Kevin Meyers, Tripoli's prospective commanding officer; acting Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas Dee; Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias; and former Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy Huntington Ingalls Industries by Lance Davis/Released)
PASCAGOULA, Miss. (Sept. 16, 2017) Ship’s sponsor Lynne Mabus, smashes a bottle of sparkling wine against the bow of the future amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA 7) during the ship’s christening ceremony. Also pictured, left to right, are Rep. Steven Palazzo, R-Miss.; Capt. Kevin Meyers, Tripoli’s prospective commanding officer; acting Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas Dee; Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias; and former Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy Huntington Ingalls Industries by Lance Davis/Released)

 

PASCAGOULA, Miss. (May 1, 2017) The future USS Tripoli (LHA 7) is launched at Huntington Ingalls Industries. Tripoli was successfully launched after the dry-dock was flooded to allow it to float off for the first time. Tripoli incorporates an enlarged hangar deck, enhanced maintenance facilities, increased fuel capacity and additional storerooms to provide the fleet with a platform optimized for aviation capabilities. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
PASCAGOULA, Miss. (May 1, 2017) The future USS Tripoli (LHA 7) is launched at Huntington Ingalls Industries. Tripoli was successfully launched after the dry-dock was flooded to allow it to float off for the first time. Tripoli incorporates an enlarged hangar deck, enhanced maintenance facilities, increased fuel capacity and additional storerooms to provide the fleet with a platform optimized for aviation capabilities. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

The Sailor in me is filled with a range of emotions; I feel all at once humbled, proud and excited. I am humbled by the sheer magnitude of this 45,000-ton mighty warship, proud beyond measure to be her first commanding officer and lead this amazing crew, and excited at our future endeavors.

During time-honored traditions like a ship’s christening, the best way to appreciate what the future holds is to fully appreciate where the past has brought us.

As a student of history, the comments by Vice Adm. Walter E. “Ted” Carter, 62nd superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy, in his remarks at christening were enlightening. He spoke fondly of the Tripoli Monument, which now sits on the grounds of the Naval Academy.

For a bit of context, the ship’s name, Tripoli, harkens back to our nation’s first foreign conflict, the War with the Barbary Pirates. In 1801, President Thomas Jefferson dispatched ships instead of paying tribute and our nation’s flag was raised on foreign soil for the first time. The Marine Corps Hymn celebrates the bravery of our early Marines with the line “To the shores of Tripoli.” LHA-7, the future USS Tripoli, will be the third to bear the name.

The Tripoli Monument, I learned, is actually our nation’s oldest military monument. Carved in Livorno, Italy, in 1806 to honor the heroes of that war, it was brought to the United States aboard USS Constitution. Its first home was the Washington Navy Yard, where it sustained damage there during the War of 1812. It was then moved to the west front terrace of the U.S. Capitol, facing the National Mall in 1831, and stood there until 1860 when it was moved to the Naval Academy.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (Sept. 15, 2017) The Tripoli Monument is pictured at the U.S. Naval Academy (U.S. Navy courtesy photo/Released)
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (Sept. 15, 2017) The Tripoli Monument is pictured at the U.S. Naval Academy (U.S. Navy courtesy photo/Released)

 

As I reflect on the christening of LHA-7 Tripoli and the Tripoli monument, I find it an interesting juxtaposition. The monument—with its column, sculptures and mass of stone—resting stoically on the Naval Academy campus the last 157 years and the enormous mass of steel – Tripoli. The Tripoli Monument honors the brave men who fought our Nation’s first war centuries ago, I trust the Sailors and Marines who serve aboard Tripoli will continue to honor their forbearers. What a proud day for our Navy and our nation!

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/09/22/tripoli-then-and-now/ U.S. Navy

USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) Commissioning Ceremony

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of the July 22 commissioning of the future USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78).

Live video from Naval Station Norfolk, Va., is scheduled to begin 10 a.m. (EST).

President Donald J. Trump will deliver the ceremony’s principal address. Susan Ford Bales, Ford’s daughter, serves as the ship’s sponsor.

CVN-78 is the lead ship of the new Gerald R. Ford class of aircraft carrier, the first new class in more than 40 years and will begin the phased replacement of Nimitz-class carriers when the ship is commissioned. The Ford class incorporates advances in technology such as a new reactor plant, propulsion system, electric plant, Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS), Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG), machinery control, Dual Band Radar and integrated warfare systems. Compared to Nimitz-class carriers, the Gerald R. Ford-class carriers have more than 23 new or modified systems.

Lt. Cmdr. Gerald R. Ford, Photo Courtesy of Gerald Ford Presidential Library and Museum
Lt. Cmdr. Gerald R. Ford, Photo Courtesy of Gerald Ford Presidential Library and Museum

USS Gerald R. Ford honors the 38th president of the United States and pays tribute to his lifetime of service in the Navy, in the U.S. government and to the nation. During World War II, Ford attained the rank of lieutenant commander in the Navy, serving on the light carrier USS Monterey (CVL 26). Released from active duty in February 1946, Ford remained in the Naval Reserve until 1963. Ford was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1948, where he served until President Nixon tapped him to become Vice President in 1973. Ford became president in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal and served in the country’s highest office from 1974-1977.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/07/21/uss-gerald-r-ford-cvn-78-commissioning-ceremony/ U.S. Navy