Category: USS Somerset

Your Navy Operating Forward – Gulf of Tadjoura, Adriatic Sea, Gulf of Aden

Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: An F/A-18E Super Hornet, assigned to the “Sunliners” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 81, prepares to launch from the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Maxwell Higgins/Released)
RED SEA: Fire Controlman 2nd Class James Leonard, left, guides Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Anthony Javarone away from an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 48 during a vertical replenishment exercise aboard the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Clay/Released)
ROTA, Spain: Equipment Operator 3rd Class Calan Derue, assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 1, Alpha Company, operates an excavator to place underlayer stone along the shoreline onboard Naval Station Rota, Spain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Caine Storino/Released)
ADRIATIC SEA: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) refuels during a replenishment-at-sea with the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ford Williams/Released)
GULF OF ADEN: A visit, board, search and seizure team, assigned to the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), inspects a dhow as part of maritime security operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Clay/Released)
VALPARAISO, Chile: The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25) is moored in Valparaiso, Chile, during a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Andrew Brame/Released)
GULF OF TADJOURA: Sailors assigned to Task Group (TG) 68.6 return to base after completing an anti-terrorism force protection escort mission near Djibouti in the Gulf of Tadjoura. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Courtney Dabronzo/Released)
ADRIATIC SEA: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) fires its 5-inch gun during a live-fire gunnery exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ford Williams/Released)
ARABIAN GULF: An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter, attached to the “Blackjacks” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 21, delivers cargo to the flight deck of the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) while on a scheduled deployment of the Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chandler Harrell/Released)
PANAMA CANAL: The guided-missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) passes underneath Centennial Bridge while transiting the Panama Canal. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class John Philip Wagner Jr./Released)
BAB AL-MANDEB: The Royal Fleet Auxiliary Bay-class auxiliary landing ship dock RFA Lyme Bay (L3007), right, is escorted by the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyers USS The Sullivans (DDG 68), left, and USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), not pictured. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Intelligence Specialist Matt Bodenner/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !

Your Navy Operating Forward – Gulf of Tadjoura, Adriatic Sea, Gulf of Aden

Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: An F/A-18E Super Hornet, assigned to the “Sunliners” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 81, prepares to launch from the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Maxwell Higgins/Released)
RED SEA: Fire Controlman 2nd Class James Leonard, left, guides Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Anthony Javarone away from an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Vipers of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 48 during a vertical replenishment exercise aboard the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Clay/Released)
ROTA, Spain: Equipment Operator 3rd Class Calan Derue, assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 1, Alpha Company, operates an excavator to place underlayer stone along the shoreline onboard Naval Station Rota, Spain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Caine Storino/Released)
ADRIATIC SEA: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) refuels during a replenishment-at-sea with the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ford Williams/Released)
GULF OF ADEN: A visit, board, search and seizure team, assigned to the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), inspects a dhow as part of maritime security operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Clay/Released)
VALPARAISO, Chile: The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25) is moored in Valparaiso, Chile, during a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Andrew Brame/Released)
GULF OF TADJOURA: Sailors assigned to Task Group (TG) 68.6 return to base after completing an anti-terrorism force protection escort mission near Djibouti in the Gulf of Tadjoura. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Courtney Dabronzo/Released)
ADRIATIC SEA: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) fires its 5-inch gun during a live-fire gunnery exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ford Williams/Released)
ARABIAN GULF: An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter, attached to the “Blackjacks” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 21, delivers cargo to the flight deck of the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) while on a scheduled deployment of the Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chandler Harrell/Released)
PANAMA CANAL: The guided-missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) passes underneath Centennial Bridge while transiting the Panama Canal. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class John Philip Wagner Jr./Released)
BAB AL-MANDEB: The Royal Fleet Auxiliary Bay-class auxiliary landing ship dock RFA Lyme Bay (L3007), right, is escorted by the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyers USS The Sullivans (DDG 68), left, and USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), not pictured. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Intelligence Specialist Matt Bodenner/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

Cmdr. John Moree, from Mobile, Ala., inspects a lump in a patient’s mouth at a land-based medical site. The hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) is on an 11-week medical support mission to Central and South America as part of U.S. Southern Command’s Enduring Promise initiative. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman J. Keith Wilson/Released)
Sailors assigned to the Fighting Checkmates of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 211, remove ordnance from an F/A-18F Super Hornet on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Maxwell Higgins/Released)
Quartermaster Seaman Anthony Alvarez stands the starboard-side lookout watch aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) as the ship returns to Naval Station Rota, Spain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan U. Kledzik/Released)
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Russell Smith speaks to Sailors during an all-hands call at U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet headquarters at Naval Support Activity Naples, Italy. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 1st Class Sarah Villegas/Released)
Sailors heave in line aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111) during a replenishment-at-sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Guadalupe (T-AO 200). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryan D. McLearnon/Released)
Ensign Erin Mannix, from Waynesville, Ohio, checks bearings using an alidade on the bridge of the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kevin Leitner/Released)
Musician 1st Class Andy Skaggs, center, plays trombone with the U.S. Navy Band jazz ensemble, Commodores, during their final concert at Key West High School. Skaggs, from Ashland, Kentucky, is a member of the U.S. Navy Concert Band who volunteered to join the Commodores on their 2018 National Tour during a period of vacancy. (U.S. Navy photo by Musician 1st Class Sarah Blecker/Released)
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson, second from right, speaks with Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Thomas Gooley/Released)
Seaman Troy Crawford stands watch on the bridge wing of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25), while underway in the Pacific Ocean. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Lasheba James/Released)
Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class Sasha Wagner, from Chicago, uses a voltmeter to ensure power has been secured to solenoids in an aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) station before performing maintenance aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryan D. McLearnon/Released)
Sailors assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) read to students at Sewell’s Point Elementary School. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Matt Herbst/ Released)
Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Airman Kierra Reames mans a sound-powered phone for elevator operation in primary flight control aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Victoria Granado/Released)
Lt. Daniel Naranjo, a nurse practitioner from Miami, is interviewed by local media at a land-based medical site in Turbo, Colombia. The hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) is on an 11-week medical support mission to Central and South America as part of U.S. Southern Command’s Enduring Promise initiative. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman J. Keith Wilson/Released)
Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Cody Soto, from Goliad, Texas, fires a shot line with an M14 rifle from the boat deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS Green Bay (LPD 20) to the dry-cargo and ammunition ship USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8) during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anaid Banuelos Rodriguez/Released)
Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Alma Gallegos, left, and Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Kjae Robinson assigned to the submarine tender USS Emory S. Land (AS 39), operate Mark 38 weapons systems during the 24th annual Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) exercises in the South China Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass CommSailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.unication Specialist 2nd Class Richard Miller/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

We Serve. We Remember 9/11.

Never forget!

Today and every day, we remember Sept. 11, 2001 – especially our shipmates who are serving aboard three U.S. Navy ships dedicated and named after the locations where the 9/11 attacks occurred:

Click on the graphic to enlarge and download it.

 

🇺🇸  USS New York (LPD 21), named in honor of the City of New York where the attacks on the World Trade Center occurred, includes 7.5 tons of steel in its stem salvaged from the World Trade Center.

NEW YORK (Sept. 15, 2001) A New York City fireman calls for 10 more rescue workers to make their way into the rubble of the World Trade Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Preston Keres/Released)
NEW YORK (Sept. 15, 2001) A New York City fireman calls for 10 more rescue workers to make their way into the rubble of the World Trade Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Preston Keres/Released)

 

🇺🇸 USS Arlington (LPD 24), named in honor of Arlington County, Virginia, where American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the west wall of the Pentagon, contains a “Tribute Room” that includes a section of I-Beam and remnants from the site.

ARLINGTON, Virginia (Sept. 11, 2001) Medical personnel and volunteers work the first medical triage area set up outside the Pentagon after a hijacked commercial airliner crashed into the southwest corner of the building. (U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Mark D. Faram/Released)
ARLINGTON, Virginia (Sept. 11, 2001) Medical personnel and volunteers work the first medical triage area set up outside the Pentagon after a hijacked commercial airliner crashed into the southwest corner of the building. (U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Mark D. Faram/Released)

 

🇺🇸 USS Somerset (LPD 25), named in honor Somerset County where United Airlines Flight 93 crashed into a field, contains 22 tons of steel in the ship’s bow from excavators present at the crash site in Pennsylvania.

Aerial view of the impact site and debris field taken in the early stages of the investigation in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, in September 2001. The white specks are debris. (U.S. National Park Service photo courtesy of the Federal Bureau of Investigation/Released)
Aerial view of the impact site and debris field taken in the early stages of the investigation in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, in September 2001. The white specks are debris. (U.S. National Park Service photo courtesy of the Federal Bureau of Investigation/Released)

 

What are your memories of Sept. 11, 2001? Tell us in the comments below.

We Serve. We Remember 9/11.

Never forget!

Today and every day, we remember Sept. 11, 2001 – especially our shipmates who are serving aboard three U.S. Navy ships dedicated and named after the locations where the 9/11 attacks occurred:

Click on the graphic to enlarge and download it.

 

🇺🇸  USS New York (LPD 21), named in honor of the City of New York where the attacks on the World Trade Center occurred, includes 7.5 tons of steel in its stem salvaged from the World Trade Center.

NEW YORK (Sept. 15, 2001) A New York City fireman calls for 10 more rescue workers to make their way into the rubble of the World Trade Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Preston Keres/Released)
NEW YORK (Sept. 15, 2001) A New York City fireman calls for 10 more rescue workers to make their way into the rubble of the World Trade Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Preston Keres/Released)

 

🇺🇸 USS Arlington (LPD 24), named in honor of Arlington County, Virginia, where American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the west wall of the Pentagon, contains a “Tribute Room” that includes a section of I-Beam and remnants from the site.

ARLINGTON, Virginia (Sept. 11, 2001) Medical personnel and volunteers work the first medical triage area set up outside the Pentagon after a hijacked commercial airliner crashed into the southwest corner of the building. (U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Mark D. Faram/Released)
ARLINGTON, Virginia (Sept. 11, 2001) Medical personnel and volunteers work the first medical triage area set up outside the Pentagon after a hijacked commercial airliner crashed into the southwest corner of the building. (U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Mark D. Faram/Released)

 

🇺🇸 USS Somerset (LPD 25), named in honor Somerset County where United Airlines Flight 93 crashed into a field, contains 22 tons of steel in the ship’s bow from excavators present at the crash site in Pennsylvania.

Aerial view of the impact site and debris field taken in the early stages of the investigation in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, in September 2001. The white specks are debris. (U.S. National Park Service photo courtesy of the Federal Bureau of Investigation/Released)
Aerial view of the impact site and debris field taken in the early stages of the investigation in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, in September 2001. The white specks are debris. (U.S. National Park Service photo courtesy of the Federal Bureau of Investigation/Released)

 

What are your memories of Sept. 11, 2001? Tell us in the comments below.

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Kirsten Austin, part of Naval Medical Center San Diego’s (NMCSD) colors detail, salutes the flag during morning colors. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Zach Kreitzer)
Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Malik Black, from Miami, right, and Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Joe Tyson, from Myrtle Beach, S.C., man a .50-caliber machine gun as the guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey (DDG 105) arrives in Pearl Harbor after participating in the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Devin M. Langer/Released)
Sailors prepare to transfer ordnance onto an F/A-18E Super Hornet from the Pukin’ Dogs of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 143 on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jessica Paulauskas/Released)
A child selected as the Port of Seattle Police Department Chief for a Day, mans the helm of the amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25) with Capt. Brian Quin, commanding officer of Somerset. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang)
Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Marci Seymore stands watch as flight quarters corpsman aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68). (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Daphne White)
Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Rome Lake, from New York, observes as the guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey (DDG 105) arrives at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after participating in the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Devin M. Langer/Released)
Logistics Specialist 1st Class Ralph Palme, assigned to the Harpers Ferry-class dock landing ship USS Oak Hill (LSD 51) holds his daughter during an interview after returning from deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caledon Rabbipal)
A member of the U.S. Navy parachute team, The Leapfrogs, lands during the 2018 Fargo Airsho. The Leapfrogs were commissioned in 1974 by the Chief of Naval Operations with the mission to demonstrate Navy excellence throughout the United States. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick Bauer)
U.S. Navy Lt. j.g. Sean Hudgins, right, and Gunner’s Mate Stephen Barahona, members of a visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team assigned the guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), tactically move aboard an Egyptian Naval Force (ENF) supply ship with an ENF VBSS team during an integrated-team VBSS evolution as part of exercise Eagle Salute 18. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Clay/Released)
Sonar Technician (Surface) 3rd Class Thomas Stanton, right, and Sonar Technician (Surface) 1st Class April Davis monitor sonar activity in sonar control aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) during an anti-submarine warfare event as part of exercise Eagle Salute 18. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Clay/Released)
Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Lisette Longoria stands watch on the port bridge wing of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) during a general quarters drill. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan U. Kledzik)
An honor guard detail tasked by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) moves transfer cases for transport during an honorable carry ceremony at Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay, Marine Corps Base Hawaii. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Aaron S. Patterson)
Capt. Martin Muckian, commander of Submarine Squadron 6, crosses the brow the Virginia-class fast-attack submarine USS Washington (SSN 787) at the conclusion of the change of command ceremony in Norfolk, Va. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

 

USS Somerset: Tribute to Strength and Courage Aboard 9/11 United Flight 93

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, crew and passengers boarded United Airlines Flight 93 expecting to land in San Francisco later that day. Instead, at 10:03 a.m., Flight 93 was brought down to its final resting spot in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

The actions of the flight’s passengers prevented terrorist hijackers from reaching their destination.

Gordon Felt’s brother, Ed, was one of the passengers aboard that flight, which crashed in Somerset County.

Today, 16 years later, USS Somerset – named in honor of Flight 93’s courageous passengers and crew – is one of the Navy’s 9/11 tribute ships, among USS New York (LPD 21) and USS Arlington (LPD 24).

Watch how USS Somerset is keeping the strength and courage of Flight 93’s passengers alive as Somerset’s Sailors protect and defend America.

 

USS Somerset: Tribute to Strength and Courage Aboard 9/11 United Flight 93

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, crew and passengers boarded United Airlines Flight 93 expecting to land in San Francisco later that day. Instead, at 10:03 a.m., Flight 93 was brought down to its final resting spot in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

The actions of the flight’s passengers prevented terrorist hijackers from reaching their destination.

Gordon Felt’s brother, Ed, was one of the passengers aboard that flight, which crashed in Somerset County.

Today, 16 years later, USS Somerset – named in honor of Flight 93’s courageous passengers and crew – is one of the Navy’s 9/11 tribute ships, among USS New York (LPD 21) and USS Arlington (LPD 24).

Watch how USS Somerset is keeping the strength and courage of Flight 93’s passengers alive as Somerset’s Sailors protect and defend America.

 

USS Somerset Shines on Maiden Deployment

By Capt. Darren Glaser
Commanding Officer, USS Somerset (LPD 25)

SAN DIEGO (Oct. 14, 2016) — Line handlers assigned to Naval Station San Diego release the mooring lines as the amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25), departs for a scheduled deployment. Somerset is a part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group, which will serve in the U.S. 3rd, 5th, and 7th Fleet area of operation, providing maritime security operations, crisis response capability, theater security cooperation and forward naval presence. (U.S. Navy Photo by Seaman Kelsey Hockenberger/Released)
SAN DIEGO (Oct. 14, 2016) — Line handlers assigned to Naval Station San Diego release the mooring lines as the amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25), departs for a scheduled deployment. (U.S. Navy Photo by Seaman Kelsey Hockenberger/Released)

As we departed Naval Base San Diego Oct. 14, 2016, for USS Somerset’s (LPD 25) maiden deployment, along with USS Makin Island (LHD 8) and USS Comstock (LSD 45) for operations in the U.S. 3rd, 5th and 7th, I knew the ship and crew were more than ready. Now, as we prepare to return to San Diego on May 15, I want to share how Somerset shined on our maiden deployment.

We worked very hard transitioning from a pre-commissioning unit to a deployment ready U.S. Navy warship – first through the basic phase of training and then into the intermediate phase as integrated members of the Amphibious Squadron  5/11th Marine Expeditionary Unit team and the ‘Makin Island’ Amphibious Readiness Group. During this training, Somerset Sailors and Marines quickly learned to work together and completed certification in all mission areas we could be assigned to perform throughout a deployment. Since setting sail, the Makin Island Amphibious Readiness Group has collectively been engaged in numerous operations defending U.S. interests and maintaining freedom of the seas.

APRA HARBOR, GUAM (April 20, 2017) The amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25) heads towards Guam for a scheduled liberty port visit. Somerset, with the embarked 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (11th MEU), was operating in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region to enhance amphibious capability with regional partners and to serve as a ready-response force for any type of contingency. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jacob I. Allison/Released)
APRA HARBOR, GUAM (April 20, 2017) The amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25) heads towards Guam for a scheduled liberty port visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jacob I. Allison/Released)

 

As a San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock (LPD) ship, Somerset offers the kind of innovation and cutting edge technology the surface Navy needs to meet future challenges at sea – both during this initial deployment and for years to come. The ship includes innovations in its external design that reduces the ship’s appearance on radars and a state-of-the-art command and control network. San Antonio-class ships were designed to be stealthy, have significant survivability features and an advanced computer technology to accomplish a broad range of missions. This class is the first amphibious ships in the U.S. Navy to feature these design innovations. High-tech systems, an integrated Ship Wide Area Network, video cameras located throughout the ship, and technology like the Consolidated Visual Information System allow the crew to monitor the vast array of systems onboard, while requiring fewer personnel at watch stations.

WATERS NEAR TRINCOMALEE, SRI LANKA (Nov. 22, 2016) Sailors aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25) lower a rigid-hull inflatable boat with a knuckle-boom crane of the coast of Sri Lanka in preparation for a theater security cooperation exchange with the Sri Lankan military. Somerset and embarked 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit were conducting the exchange with Sri Lankan forces in order to enhance tactical skill sets and disaster relief capabilities while strengthening the overall relationship between the two forces (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Chavez/Released)
WATERS NEAR TRINCOMALEE, SRI LANKA (Nov. 22, 2016) Sailors aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25) lower a rigid-hull inflatable boat with a knuckle-boom crane of the coast of Sri Lanka in preparation for a theater security cooperation exchange with the Sri Lankan military. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Chavez/Released)

These advanced systems facilitate both external and internal flexibility to not only serve as a warfare commander in a strike group, but also gives the crew the ability to monitor vital ship system’s from traditional controlling stations like the bridge, as well as in other places like a joint planning room, the wardroom lounge or even the ship’s library and chapel. With shipboard innovations in technology like the Consolidated Visual Information System, it’s possible to be in the helo control tower and review all the parameters of online equipment in the engine rooms, keep an eye on all surface/air contacts while sitting in the wardroom or even steer the ship all the way back by the flight deck in our These unique capabilities have been in high demand and we have participated in major operational tasking throughout the deployment. A true testament to our resolve, we remained on station and at sea for as long as 76 consecutive days supporting missions.

Through our work, we demonstrated our commitment to readiness. Operations included several firsts for the United States and our partnering nation, Sri Lanka, as the first and largest U.S. Navy warship to conduct both Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) and air ship-to-shore operations on a Sri Lankan Naval Base and first ever theater security cooperation exercise with the Sri Lankan Navy (Marines). This enabled a first major military-to-military exercise, multiple exchanges and training events with the U.S. Marines and Sri Lanka forces. While Somerset already has three of its own rigid-hull inflatable boats, we embarked an additional two rigid-hull inflatable boats crewed by Assault Craft Unit 5 to support the Marine’s Maritime Raid Force operations. Our LCACs from Beach Master Unit 5 moved Marines and their equipment to beaches around the world during this deployment. Our ability to rapidly embark diverse joint forces, integrate them, deploy them close to the mission objective and support them in the execution of their mission sets has been critical to getting the job done this deployment. Additionally, we also took part in exercises and engagements with our valuable strategic partners in Oman and Djibouti.

SALALAH, OMAN (March 4, 2017) Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class Brandon Kellum, from Harlem, N.Y., signals a vehicle onto a landing craft, air cushion (LCAC), assigned to Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 5, during exercise Sea Soldier 17. The annual, bilateral exercise is conducted with the Royal Army of Oman and is designed to demonstrate the cooperative skill and will of U.S. and partner nations to work together in maintaining regional stability and security. The amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25), with the embarked 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit, is deployed in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of maritime security operations designed to reassure allies and partners, preserve the freedom of navigation and the free flow of commerce and enhance regional stability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Amanda Chavez/Released)
SALALAH, OMAN (March 4, 2017) Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class Brandon Kellum, from Harlem, N.Y., signals a vehicle onto a landing craft, air cushion (LCAC), assigned to Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 5, during exercise Sea Soldier 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Amanda Chavez/Released)

 

GULF OF ADEN (Dec. 21, 2016) Lt. Taryn Cazzolii, right, the senior medical officer aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25), and Lt. Cmdr. Timothy Donahue, a Fleet Surgical Team (FST) 5 surgeon, operate on a patient during Somerset’s first ever onboard surgery. FST 5 is embarked aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8) in order to enhance surgical, casualty receiving and trauma treatment capabilities across the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and embarked 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). Somerset was deployed with the Makin Island and 11th MEU to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Amanda Chavez/Released)
GULF OF ADEN (Dec. 21, 2016) Lt. Taryn Cazzolii, right, the senior medical officer aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25), and Lt. Cmdr. Timothy Donahue, a Fleet Surgical Team (FST) 5 surgeon, operate on a patient during Somerset’s first ever onboard surgery. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Amanda Chavez/Released)

Using this technology, all of the impressive work is accomplished with a ship operating with lower manning levels than traditional ships of its size. Somerset, and the other San Antonio-class ships like it, are unique and forward-thinking surface warfare ships that bring a wide array of naval warfighting and Defense Support of Civil Authorities capabilities together in one package. Her distinctive characteristics make Somerset worldwide deployable for almost any mission – but I am the first to admit, the ship would only be a shell without the devoted Sailors and Marines. Each LPD-17 class can support up to 800 additional personnel, provide medical care (we have both surgical and dental capability) and it encompasses more than 23,000 square feet of vehicle storage space, more than double of the previous LPD-4 class it replaced. Somerset’s crew is both highly trained and prepared to support command and control, to on load and offload people, provisions and/or special equipment ashore.

Dedicated, highly trained and professional, the Somerset team is united to defend our country and to keep the seas safe and free. The ship’s array of accomplishments on this first deployment, from naval firsts with other countries to successfully carrying out traditional mission tasking, are a direct result of the hard work and service of the crew and their embarked 11th MEU counterparts on board. They are the heart of the ship – without them, the ship could not move operate and fight to deliver concentrated, projected combat power ashore or execute the vast number of humanitarian missions we have the flexibility to support.

Having served on several different ship classes in my career, I could not ask to serve on a more powerful surface warship or with a better crew! As one of the Navy’s three 9/11 Memorial ships, the memory of Flight 93’s courage and sacrifice lives on, embodied by Somerset’s Sailors and embarked Marines. Somerset has 22 tons of steel from one of two mining excavators present at the crash site, which stood witness to the crash of Flight 93, and later where an American flag was flown by first responders during the recovery operation. That steel was melted down and incorporated into the bow stem of this ship during its construction. That piece of history and courage through adversity is now a part of the backbone of this ship, it cutting through the water for both this crew as we return from our maiden deployment and future crews who will serve aboard this ship.

 

SOUTH CHINA SEA (Nov. 10, 2016) Capt. Darren Glaser, commanding officer of the amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25), and Lt. Col. Matthew Lundgren, commanding officer of Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (11th MEU), salute during a ceremony for the 241st birthday of the Marine Corps aboard Somerset.
SOUTH CHINA SEA (Nov. 10, 2016) Capt. Darren Glaser, commanding officer of the amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25), and Lt. Col. Matthew Lundgren, commanding officer of Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (11th MEU), salute during a ceremony for the 241st birthday of the Marine Corps aboard Somerset. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Jacob I. Allison/Released)

Editor’s Note: Capt. Glaser’s service aboard Somerset began as this ship’s executive officer in October 2015 before assuming his current role as the ship’s third commanding officer.

Faces of the Fleet

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

Lt. j.g. Jason McClinton, the admin officer aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8), delivers a speech during a Martin Luther King Jr. celebration on the mess decks. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Devin M. Langer/Released)
Lt. j.g. Jason McClinton, the admin officer aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8), delivers a speech during a Martin Luther King Jr. celebration on the mess decks. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Devin M. Langer/Released)
Lt. Joel Snedeker, Safety Officer aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25), participates in fire hose handling training with members of the crew. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Amanda Chavez/Released)
Lt. Joel Snedeker, Safety Officer aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25), participates in fire hose handling training with members of the crew. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Amanda Chavez/Released)
Aviation Boatswains Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Dylan Mills directs the crew of a C-2A Greyhound from Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Released)
Aviation Boatswains Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Dylan Mills directs the crew of a C-2A Greyhound from Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Released)
Aviation Machinist's Mates 2nd Class Brittany Evans and Jason Lee, both assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 3, Southern California Offshore Range (SCORE) detachment, run into the rotor wash of an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter to attach a torpedo recovery at San Clemente Island, Calif. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chad M. Butler/Released)
Aviation Machinist’s Mates 2nd Class Brittany Evans and Jason Lee, both assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 3, Southern California Offshore Range (SCORE) detachment, run into the rotor wash of an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter to attach a torpedo recovery at San Clemente Island, Calif. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chad M. Butler/Released)
Musician 1st Class Alexander Kovling marches with the U.S. Navy Band as they rehearse their parade movements in front of the White House in preparation for the 58th Presidential Inauguration. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Musician Stephen Hassay/Released)
Musician 1st Class Alexander Kovling marches with the U.S. Navy Band as they rehearse their parade movements in front of the White House in preparation for the 58th Presidential Inauguration. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Musician Stephen Hassay/Released)
The urn and flag bearers bow their heads during the benediction at a burial at sea ceremony aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kelsey L. Adams/Released)
The urn and flag bearers bow their heads during the benediction at a burial at sea ceremony aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kelsey L. Adams/Released)
Senior Chief Gunner's Mate James Hoppa, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5), fires a shot line to make contact with the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Joshua Humphreys (T-AO 188) during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caleb Strong/Released)
Senior Chief Gunner’s Mate James Hoppa, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5), fires a shot line to make contact with the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Joshua Humphreys (T-AO 188) during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caleb Strong/Released)
Hull Maintenance Technician 2nd Class Nikolus Biles, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5), cuts a piece of sheet metal in the hull technician’s shop. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Magen F. Reed/Released)
Hull Maintenance Technician 2nd Class Nikolus Biles, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5), cuts a piece of sheet metal in the hull technician’s shop. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Magen F. Reed/Released)
Sailors assigned to the Navy's only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), take the Navy-wide E-7 advancement exam at the James D. Kelly Fleet Recreation Center on Command, Fleet Activities Yokosuka. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW/AW) Kenneth Abbate/Released)
Sailors assigned to the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), take the Navy-wide E-7 advancement exam at the James D. Kelly Fleet Recreation Center on Command, Fleet Activities Yokosuka. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW/AW) Kenneth Abbate/Released)
170111-N-RM689-127 PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 11, 2017) Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108) salvage a retrievable exercise torpedo during a recovery exercise. Wayne E. Meyer is part of the Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group who will report to U.S. 3rd Fleet, headquartered in San Diego, while deployed to the western Pacific as part of the U.S. Pacific Fleet-led initiative to extend the command and control functions of 3rd Fleet into the region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kelsey L. Adams/Released)
Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108) salvage a retrievable exercise torpedo during a recovery exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kelsey L. Adams/Released)
Sailors assigned to the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) patch a pipe during a fire drill. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alyssa Weeks/Released)
Sailors assigned to the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) patch a pipe during a fire drill. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alyssa Weeks/Released)
Operations Specialist 1st Class Adam Trent and Sean McGaffey, both assigned to the Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75), stand watch during a naval surface fire support exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alyssa Weeks/Released)
Operations Specialist 1st Class Adam Trent and Sean McGaffey, both assigned to the Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75), stand watch during a naval surface fire support exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alyssa Weeks/Released)
Sailors assigned to the USS North Carolina (BB 55) stand at attention as Cmdr. Gary Montalvo, the ship’s commanding officer, accepts a Navy Unit Commendation presented by Capt. Richard Seif, commanding officer of Submarine Squadron 1 onboard Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
Sailors assigned to the USS North Carolina (BB 55) stand at attention as Cmdr. Gary Montalvo, the ship’s commanding officer, accepts a Navy Unit Commendation presented by Capt. Richard Seif, commanding officer of Submarine Squadron 1 onboard Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar, the Commander of Joint Region Marianas, reads to preschool students at the child development center onboard U.S. Naval Hospital Guam. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kristina D. Rasco/Released)
Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar, the Commander of Joint Region Marianas, reads to preschool students at the child development center onboard U.S. Naval Hospital Guam. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kristina D. Rasco/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.