Rustic American Flag Gunny's Job Board

Category Archives: Bruce Lindsey

Best Wishes from Optimistic Outgoing CNAL Commander

By Rear Adm. Bruce Lindsey
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

NORFOLK, Va. (Oct. 19, 2017) Rear Adm. Bruce Lindsey gives remarks during a change of command ceremony for Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic in USS Gerald R. Ford's (CVN 78) hangar bay. Rear Adm. Roy Kelley relieved Lindsey of command. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Gitte Schirrmacher)
NORFOLK, Va. (Oct. 19, 2017) Rear Adm. Bruce Lindsey gives remarks during a change of command ceremony for Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic in USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN 78) hangar bay. Rear Adm. Roy Kelley relieved Lindsey of command. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Gitte Schirrmacher)

It is with a tremendous sense of pride that I bid the hard working, professional women and men leading Naval Aviation on the East Coast, farewell. My time serving as commander of Naval Air Force Atlantic is now over. This position has been one of the most rewarding of my career because of the people I have had the honor to serve with – bright, dedicated, patriotic Americans who are proudly serving our Navy and our nation. Throughout my time in this position, your willingness and ability to get the job correctly done never ceased to amaze me.

Seeing everything this team has accomplished during my tenure has me convinced that Naval Aviation is better and stronger than ever. The highlights below are just that, highlights pulled from a long and extensive list of the achievements and accomplishments of our Sailors.

  • December 2016, we celebrated the homecoming of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG) from a seven-month deployment. This was the first successful deployment of a CSG under the Optimized Fleet Response Plan (OFRP) and the lessons learned from this deployment strengthened our confidence in the new standard throughout the entire Navy.
  • The George H. W. Bush CSG returned from their seven-month deployment in August 2017. Conducting “prompt and sustained combat power from and at sea,” the strike group delivered a devastating blow to the capabilities of ISIS, allowing our partners on the battlefield to retake large swaths of land in northern Iraq and Syria and regain the strategic initiative.
  • In July 2017, we commissioned the newest addition to the Navy’s carrier fleet, USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). Within days of the ship’s commissioning, Ford was at sea proving her advanced technology worked, launching and recovering F/A-18 Super Hornets.
  • We also welcome back USS Abraham Lincoln from a four year midlife refueling and USS Harry S. Truman, which wrapped up its planned incremental availability from Norfolk Naval Shipyard two days ahead of schedule.
ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 28, 2017) An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 flies over the aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). The aircraft carrier was underway conducting test and evaluation operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Erik Hildebrandt/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 28, 2017) An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 flies over the aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). The aircraft carrier was underway conducting test and evaluation operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Erik Hildebrandt/Released)

 

The accomplishments of our aviators, air crews and maintainers are also too many to list in their entirety, but impressive nonetheless.

  • The squadrons of Carrier Air Wings (CVW) Three and Eight, while deployed with Eisenhower and Bush CSGs returned home with record breaking numbers. Combined, these two carriers flew 13,247 sorties, delivered 3,110,000 pounds (1,555 tons) of ordnance and logged a total of 64,268 flight hours and 20,868 successful traps.
  • In the wake of hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, numerous helicopter squadrons from the East and West Coasts were manned and ready, providing lifesaving relief efforts and aid. These squadrons are shining examples of the Navy’s capability and readiness to help our fellow Americans in a time of crisis.

 

DOMINICA (Sept. 24, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Logan Parkinson prepares victims inside an MH-60S Sea Hawk from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 22 (HSC-22) attached to the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) for evacuation from the island of Dominica following the landfall of Hurricane Maria. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Taylor King/Released)
DOMINICA (Sept. 24, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Logan Parkinson prepares victims inside an MH-60S Sea Hawk from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 22 (HSC-22) attached to the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) for evacuation from the island of Dominica following the landfall of Hurricane Maria.
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Taylor King/Released)

 

While I congratulate our Sailors for their many milestones during my tenure, I must also thank the hundreds of civilians and contractors who serve by their side doing their part to ensure the force stays mission ready. I have every confidence in the people across Naval Aviation’s many commands and believe without reservation that your successes will continue and you will continue to meet every new challenge head on and succeed.

So it is with a great sense of pride and accomplishment that I leave you all. Thank you and good luck to each and every one of you. The honor and privilege has been all mine.

With warm regards and sincere appreciation,
“Birdie”

 

ARABIAN GULF (May 21, 2017) Rear Adm. Bruce Lindsey, commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic (CNAL), speaks to Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Daniel Logan aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) (GHWB). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Gaines/Released)
ARABIAN GULF (May 21, 2017) Rear Adm. Bruce Lindsey, commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic (CNAL), speaks to Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Daniel Logan aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) (GHWB). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Gaines/Released)

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/10/20/best-wishes-from-optimistic-outgoing-cnal-commander/ U.S. Navy

AIRLANT’s Secret to Success for Hurricane Relief – Teamwork!

By Rear Adm. Bruce Lindsey
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

Between hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, nearly 170 Americans lost their lives this summer. Thousands of others lost their homes and all their possessions: clothing, furniture, pets and decades of memories. Our hearts and prayers go out to all those caught in the path of these deadly storms. We have seen tragedies like this play out before with hurricanes such as Andrew, Gustov and Katrina. Now Harvey, Irma and Maria join these names forever burned into our memories.

While all of these hurricanes resulted in death and destruction, they also have something else in common – the Navy was there to answer the call for help.

VIDOR, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, reassures a family after a rescue at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)
VIDOR, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, reassures a family after a rescue at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)

 

As Hurricane Harvey approached the shores of Texas, the Navy was called into action. HSC-7 Dusty Dogs and HSC-28 Dragon Whales were the first squadrons to arrive on station, tirelessly working around the clock through dangerous weather conditions to save lives. Often in the darkness of night, using night vision optics and infrared capabilities, the two squadrons saved hundreds of citizens from the rising flood waters.

All told, HSC-7 and HSC-28 flew 49 sorties accumulating 225 flight hours. They combined for 358 rescues while also saving 22 dogs and 5 cats, and delivering 1,660 lbs. of water, food and medical supplies. They were relieved Sept. 3 by our West Coast counterparts, HSC-21 Blackjacks and HSC-23 Wildcards, who continued flying search and rescue/logistics coverage during the day and stood the alert SAR overnight.

CARIBBEAN SEA (Sept. 7, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class John Malico and Aircrewman (Rescue Swimmer) 1st Class Erick Sotelo, both assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 22, help a mother and child during the U.S. Navy relief efforts in the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nathan Wilkes/Released)
CARIBBEAN SEA (Sept. 7, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class John Malico and Aircrewman (Rescue Swimmer) 1st Class Erick Sotelo, both assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 22, help a mother and child during the U.S. Navy relief efforts in the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nathan Wilkes/Released)

Less than two weeks later, Hurricane Irma came ashore in southern Florida leaving a trail of destruction as it moved north. The Florida Keys were amongst the hardest hit area with homes destroyed, boats sunk in channels and harbors, and power cut off to the thousands of stranded survivors. Without skipping a beat, the Navy was there to respond. Stationed aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), HSM-70 Spartans and HSC-28 Dragon Whales flew mission after mission to provide help delivering food, fresh water and medical supplies. To their south off the Florida Keys, HSC-22 Sea Knights joined in the efforts from aboard USS Wasp (LHD 1), who was accompanied by six HSC-28 MH-60S’s embarked in USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and four MH-60Rs, one aircraft each from HSM-40/46/48/74, embarked in USS New York (LPD 21).

As things were looking up for Florida, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico were in the crosshairs once again for a third hurricane. Maria was a Category 4 storm with winds gusting up to 156 mph. The devastation was massive and unprecedented.

In addition to our ships that were already in the area, four Norfolk-based squadrons completed a successful 1,400-mile cross-country flight to Puerto Rico. Nearly 200 personnel from HSC-5, HSC-7, HM-14, and HM-15 once again answered the call for the Navy. Their efforts are proving to be instrumental in bringing relief to those ravaged by the destructive power of Mother Nature.

As of Oct. 16, the Navy-Marine Corps team aboard USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), USS Wasp (LHD 1), USS Oak Hill (LSD 51), and the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit have conducted 68 MEDEVAC flights, logged roughly 920 flight hours in support of recovery operations, and delivered nearly 3.5 million lbs of relief supplies and cargo.

CENTRO COMMUNAL, Puerto Rico (Oct. 8, 2017) Lt. Dakota Davis, left, and Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Joseph Snyder, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), and a local volunteer unload drinking water from an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter for distribution to the citizens of Centro Communal, Puerto Rico. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dana Denice Legg/Released)
CENTRO COMMUNAL, Puerto Rico (Oct. 8, 2017) Lt. Dakota Davis, left, and Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Joseph Snyder, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), and a local volunteer unload drinking water from an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter for distribution to the citizens of Centro Communal, Puerto Rico. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dana Denice Legg/Released)

Whether it’s defending our nation or rushing to the aid of our citizens in distress, Americans can count on our Navy. This is why we have a Navy and why we constantly train to be ready on a moment’s notice. Our aviators, our air crews, our maintainers and our shipboard Sailors continue to make us proud with their professional and selfless service on the front lines of these storms, but we should also acknowledge the efforts of those in operations, maintenance, supply, public affairs, legal, medical and countless other departments.

Naval Aviation is a TEAM sport and the team is STRONG.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/10/17/airlants-secret-to-success-for-hurricane-relief-teamwork/ U.S. Navy

Third Optimized Fleet Response Plan Carrier Strike Group Returns Home

By Rear Adm. Bruce Lindsey
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

After completing a seven-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operations in support of maritime theater security operations and flying missions supporting Operation Inherent Resolve over the skies of Iraq and Syria, the ships and squadrons of the USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group returned safely home.

Thousands of friends and family members lined the piers of Naval Station Norfolk to welcome home more than 6,000 strike group Sailors! More than 300 Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 aircrew flew home to cheering, flag-waving crowds in Norfolk, Oceana, Mayport and Whidbey Island.

While deployed, CVW-8 and USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) launched 11,437 sorties, completed 1,924 combat missions. With flawless execution the aviators successfully delivered 1,717 pieces of ordnance on target with devastating lethality. By the end of the deployment, our aviators logged an amazing 30,873 flight hours and 7,868 arrested landings. These impressive numbers set post-Desert Storm records for any CVN/CVW team.

This deployment is yet another example of the pivotal role naval aviation plays in our national defense. As the U.S. Navy’s ‘Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority’ states, we have the mission to “conduct PROMPT and SUSTAINED combat power from and at sea, necessary to fight and win decisively in contested and denied environments against our enemies.” That is exactly what the men and women of CVW-8 and the strike group accomplished on deployment. The team delivered a devastating blow to the capabilities of ISIS, allowing our partners on the battlefield to employ a strategic initiative to retake large swaths of land in Northern Iraq and Syria.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 8, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) operate in formation during exercise Saxon Warrior 2017. The United States and United Kingdom co-hosted carrier strike group exercise demonstrates interoperability and capability to respond to crises and deter potential threats. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael B. Zingaro/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 8, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) operate in formation during exercise Saxon Warrior 2017. The United States and United Kingdom co-hosted carrier strike group exercise demonstrates interoperability and capability to respond to crises and deter potential threats. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael B. Zingaro/Released)

I have written several blog posts about how our carriers benefit from the Optimized Fleet Response Plan (OFRP). OFRP is designed to maximize our return on training and maintenance investments, to maintain Sailor quality of life and ensure units are fully employable and deployable. By the time the strike group deployed, it was at the peak of readiness and this was clearly demonstrated through their record-setting accomplishments.

With USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) now at Norfolk Naval Shipyard to begin her maintenance phase, the first phase of the four-part OFRP cycle, George H.W. Bush enters the post deployment portion of its sustainment phase to maintain her combat readiness in order to be prepared to deploy fully ready combat forces if required by our Nation.

While George H.W. Bush is in her sustainment phase, CVW-8 will also be in sustainment. For the air wing, this means several underway periods to maintain their carrier qualification requirements, maintain their aircraft at optimum performance levels and provide continuous training in combat flight operations and maintenance.

Meeting these standards will allow CVW-8 to effectively remain combat ready around the clock in the event the president of the United States decides they need to surge an additional carrier strike group.

This will be a challenge, but I have every confidence that the George H. W. Bush Carrier Strike Group team will not only meet but also exceed our leadership’s standards and expectations.

Finally, I send my strongest congratulations to entire carrier strike group for your tireless efforts and commitment to the Navy’s standard of excellence. Bravo Zulu, well done and welcome home!

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 18, 2017) Sailors assigned to the "Tomcatters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 celebrate as the squadron flies over the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). The ship and its carrier strike group were transiting home from a scheduled seven-month deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 18, 2017) Sailors assigned to the “Tomcatters” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 celebrate as the squadron flies over the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). The ship and its carrier strike group were transiting home from a scheduled seven-month deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/09/08/third-optimized-fleet-response-plan-carrier-strike-group-returns-home/ U.S. Navy

Third Optimized Fleet Response Plan Carrier Strike Group Returns Home

By Rear Adm. Bruce Lindsey
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

After completing a seven-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operations in support of maritime theater security operations and flying missions supporting Operation Inherent Resolve over the skies of Iraq and Syria, the ships and squadrons of the USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group returned safely home.

Thousands of friends and family members lined the piers of Naval Station Norfolk to welcome home more than 6,000 strike group Sailors! More than 300 Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 aircrew flew home to cheering, flag-waving crowds in Norfolk, Oceana, Mayport and Whidbey Island.

While deployed, CVW-8 and USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) launched 11,437 sorties, completed 1,924 combat missions. With flawless execution the aviators successfully delivered 1,717 pieces of ordnance on target with devastating lethality. By the end of the deployment, our aviators logged an amazing 30,873 flight hours and 7,868 arrested landings. These impressive numbers set post-Desert Storm records for any CVN/CVW team.

This deployment is yet another example of the pivotal role naval aviation plays in our national defense. As the U.S. Navy’s ‘Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority’ states, we have the mission to “conduct PROMPT and SUSTAINED combat power from and at sea, necessary to fight and win decisively in contested and denied environments against our enemies.” That is exactly what the men and women of CVW-8 and the strike group accomplished on deployment. The team delivered a devastating blow to the capabilities of ISIS, allowing our partners on the battlefield to employ a strategic initiative to retake large swaths of land in Northern Iraq and Syria.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 8, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) operate in formation during exercise Saxon Warrior 2017. The United States and United Kingdom co-hosted carrier strike group exercise demonstrates interoperability and capability to respond to crises and deter potential threats. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael B. Zingaro/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 8, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) operate in formation during exercise Saxon Warrior 2017. The United States and United Kingdom co-hosted carrier strike group exercise demonstrates interoperability and capability to respond to crises and deter potential threats. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael B. Zingaro/Released)

I have written several blog posts about how our carriers benefit from the Optimized Fleet Response Plan (OFRP). OFRP is designed to maximize our return on training and maintenance investments, to maintain Sailor quality of life and ensure units are fully employable and deployable. By the time the strike group deployed, it was at the peak of readiness and this was clearly demonstrated through their record-setting accomplishments.

With USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) now at Norfolk Naval Shipyard to begin her maintenance phase, the first phase of the four-part OFRP cycle, George H.W. Bush enters the post deployment portion of its sustainment phase to maintain her combat readiness in order to be prepared to deploy fully ready combat forces if required by our Nation.

While George H.W. Bush is in her sustainment phase, CVW-8 will also be in sustainment. For the air wing, this means several underway periods to maintain their carrier qualification requirements, maintain their aircraft at optimum performance levels and provide continuous training in combat flight operations and maintenance.

Meeting these standards will allow CVW-8 to effectively remain combat ready around the clock in the event the president of the United States decides they need to surge an additional carrier strike group.

This will be a challenge, but I have every confidence that the George H. W. Bush Carrier Strike Group team will not only meet but also exceed our leadership’s standards and expectations.

Finally, I send my strongest congratulations to entire carrier strike group for your tireless efforts and commitment to the Navy’s standard of excellence. Bravo Zulu, well done and welcome home!

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 18, 2017) Sailors assigned to the "Tomcatters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 celebrate as the squadron flies over the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). The ship and its carrier strike group were transiting home from a scheduled seven-month deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 18, 2017) Sailors assigned to the “Tomcatters” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 celebrate as the squadron flies over the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). The ship and its carrier strike group were transiting home from a scheduled seven-month deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/09/08/third-optimized-fleet-response-plan-carrier-strike-group-returns-home/ U.S. Navy

USS Harry S. Truman Returns to Norfolk following Early Completion of Maintenance and Sea Trials

By Rear Adm. Bruce Lindsey
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

This week, Naval Station Norfolk welcomed USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) back to the waterfront, early. Truman returned Tuesday, two days ahead of schedule from her Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) after a very successful five days of underway evolutions during Sea Trials.

NORFOLK (JULY 25, 2017) Sailors assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), handle mooring lines from USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), as Harry S. Truman pulls into Naval Station Norfolk after completing sea trials (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jessica Paulauskas/Released)
NORFOLK (JULY 25, 2017) Sailors assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), handle mooring lines from USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), as Harry S. Truman pulls into Naval Station Norfolk after completing sea trials (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jessica Paulauskas/Released)

 

NORFOLK (July 25, 2017) The superstructures of the aircraft carriers USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), right, and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) are close together during Harry S. Truman's transit into port. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anthony Flynn/Released)
NORFOLK (July 25, 2017) The superstructures of the aircraft carriers USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), right, and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) are close together during Harry S. Truman’s transit into port. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anthony Flynn/Released)

For Truman’s crew and her shipyard partners, the conclusion of this maintenance period signifies the completion of 10 months of teambuilding, hard work and coordination between workforces, ultimately making the ship better today than it was when it first arrived in the yards back in September 2016.

A new pier, hundreds of additional craftsmen and efforts in modernization of shipyard equipment at NNSY have vastly contributed to the efficiency of work performed by shipyard personnel. Investments made by NNSY in more technologically advanced machinery have improved the shipyard’s productivity factor by reducing numerous job completion times from days to mere hours. For example, new, fully automated pipe-bending and gasket-cutting machines have greatly cut-down repair timelines and helped to contribute to Truman’s early completion of her scheduled maintenance.

Completing PIA early, however, was just the first step in preparing Truman for future operations. Sea Trials tested the ability of the crew and ship to operate at sea and both performed beyond expectations. During the five-day underway period, the CVN-75 team conducted more than 300 hours of shipboard evolutions including: small boat recoveries, testing Aqueous Film-Forming Foam sprinkler systems, making high speed turns, running its steam catapults, and holding a simulated replenishment-at-sea alongside USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13).

ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 21, 2017) An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter, assigned to the "Red Hawks" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 2 prepares to land on the flight deck aboard aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) as the ship transits out to sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Rebekah Watkins/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 21, 2017) An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter, assigned to the “Red Hawks” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 2 prepares to land on the flight deck aboard aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) as the ship transits out to sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Rebekah Watkins/Released)

 

These accomplishments are of staggering importance, not just for the crew aboard Truman, but for the Navy as a whole. It is yet another success story in our implementation of the Optimized Fleet Response Plan (OFRP). Having the maintenance availabilities of our carriers completed early ensures our forces get the maximum training repetitions and sets (Reps and Sets) necessary to enable our carrier strike groups to be fully combat ready to deploy on time.

Truman’s early completion of its maintenance availability and its successful performance during sea trials means that this capital warship is one step closer to doing what carriers do: conducting prompt and sustained combat operations from the sea. This isn’t just a win for Truman. It’s a win for our Navy and a win for our country. It means our carrier force, and our fleet as a whole, is more ready to deliver sea control and combat striking power anywhere, anytime our nation requires us to do so.

When you look at our waterfront today, you can’t help but see the present and future represented by our carrier fleet. For the present, look at USS Abraham Lincoln, that spent the last four years completing her midlife refueling and is now back in the fleet and training for deployment. USS Dwight D. Eisenhower has been the workhorse of the waterfront since returning, Dec. 31, 2016, from her combat deployment, keeping our carrier pilots current by launching and recovering thousands of aircraft throughout her seven-month sustainment phase. The future can be seen in the form of USS Gerald R. Ford, our newest and most technologically advanced carrier as well as USS George Washington, which is ready to begin her midlife refueling this August.

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (June 23, 2017) An F/A-18F Super Hornet attached to the "Blacklions" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213 is fully loaded with 10 GBU-32 1,000 pound bombs aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Hank Gettys/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA (June 23, 2017) An F/A-18F Super Hornet attached to the “Blacklions” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213 is fully loaded with 10 GBU-32 1,000 pound bombs aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Hank Gettys/Released)

With USS George H. W. Bush wrapping up an extremely successful combat deployment that supported the liberation of Mosul, our carriers continue to demonstrate the maneuverability, adaptability and strength of the United States Navy. And with Truman’s early return to the waterfront, our Navy will continue to protect America’s prosperity and security far from our Nation’s shorelines and face the future with the same pride and determination that we have displayed since Congress approved the construction of our first six frigates.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/07/28/uss-harry-s-truman-returns-to-norfolk-following-early-completion-of-maintenance-and-sea-trials/ U.S. Navy

USS Gerald R. Ford Ushers in New Age of Technology and Innovation

By Rear Adm. Bruce Lindsey
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

On July 22, the U.S. Navy will commission the nation’s newest nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). For the first time in more than 40 years, in a ceremony certain to be memorable, the Navy will commission the lead ship of a new class of aircraft carriers.

NEWPORT NEWS (April 8, 2017) The future USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) underway on its own power for the first time. The first-of-class ship – the first new U.S. aircraft carrier design in 40 years – will spend several days conducting builder's sea trials, a comprehensive test of many of the ship's key systems and technologies. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ridge Leoni/Released)
NEWPORT NEWS (April 8, 2017) The future USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) underway on its own power for the first time. The first-of-class ship – the first new U.S. aircraft carrier design in 40 years – will spend several days conducting builder’s sea trials, a comprehensive test of many of the ship’s key systems and technologies. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ridge Leoni/Released)

 

How will the fleet’s incorporation of the Gerald R. Ford class add to the already impressive combat power supplied by the nation’s 10 Nimitz-class aircraft carriers?

Gerald R. Ford will leverage design changes from bow to stern and from keel to mast, enabling ships of the class to fly today’s carrier aircraft with improved efficiency and ready to accommodate future manned aircraft and unmanned aerial systems.

With the Gerald R. Ford’s island scaled down and set farther aft, the flight deck has more usable area than a Nimitz class aircraft carrier, with this improved flight deck geometry, she can provide more efficiently prepare, launch and recover aircraft of today and of the future.

The Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) has replaced the traditional steam-powered catapults of the Nimitz-class. Using stored kinetic energy and solid-state electrical power conversion, EMALS provides greater control and precision when launching aircraft, expanding the ship’s operational capability to launch more types of planes, from heavy strike fighter jets to light unmanned aircraft.

 

The Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) system will recover aircraft in a wider range of environmental and operational conditions than is currently possible. Like EMALS, AAG will enable the Gerald R. Ford class to operate new air vehicle systems that require capabilities beyond that of today’s Nimitiz class aircraft carriers.

Other design changes provide for the comfort and well-being of the Sailors in the crew, air wing and embarked staffs in Gerald R. Ford. Crew members will find more privacy in redesigned sleeping areas with fewer racks per room and easier access to restroom and shower facilities. Separate spaces hold crew recreation and television viewing areas, providing consistent quiet for sleeping crew members. Wider passageways make travel through the ship more efficient in both peace and combat. Well-equipped gyms enable a variety of exercise routines. Increased air conditioning capacity adds to crew comfort and reduces maintenance caused by high heat and humidity. Even the lighting is better; 44,000 high-efficiency fluorescent T-8 light bulbs produces more light and last nearly twice as long as lighting on a Nimitz-class carrier.

In all, 23 new or modified systems distinguish Gerald R. Ford from aircraft carriers of the Nimitz-class, bringing increased safety, effectiveness and efficiency to the ship’s crew members, flight deck, propulsion system, electric plant, machinery control and integrated warfare systems.

NORFOLK (April 14, 2017) The aircraft carrier Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) pulls into Naval Station Norfolk for the first time. The first-of-class ship - the first new U.S. aircraft carrier design in 40 years - spent several days conducting builder's sea trails, a comprehensive test of many of the ship's key systems and technologies. (U.S. Navy photo by Matt Hildreth courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries/Released)
NORFOLK (April 14, 2017) The aircraft carrier Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) pulls into Naval Station Norfolk for the first time. The first-of-class ship – the first new U.S. aircraft carrier design in 40 years – spent several days conducting builder’s sea trails, a comprehensive test of many of the ship’s key systems and technologies. (U.S. Navy photo by Matt Hildreth courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries/Released)

Following the commissioning of Gerald R. Ford, the Navy will complete the ship’s outfitting and testing and will prepare this lead ship for its first operational deployment – sending the next generation of aircraft carrier capabilities forward in service to the nation. The second ship of the Gerald R. Ford class, future USS John F. Kennedy (CVN 79), is well along in construction, and the shipbuilder has begun work on the third ship, future USS Enterprise (CVN 80). These aircraft carriers, the most technologically advanced in the world, will serve alongside and complement the 10 ships of the Nimitz class, keeping America’s Navy on the forefront of today’s rapidly-evolving operational environment.

Commissioning of Gerald R. Ford will celebrate the contributions of tens of thousands of active duty Sailors, government civilians, and private sector patriots who envisioned, designed and built the lead ship of a new class of aircraft carriers, unmatched by anything else in the world.

The age of the Ford-class carrier has arrived and I am confident that these ships will continue to push the envelope for technological advancements and enable the United States to not only maintain , but to increase our maritime superiority throughout the world for the next 50 years plus.

Editor’s note: The commissioning ceremony will be webcast starting at 10 a.m. (EDT).

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/07/21/uss-gerald-r-ford-ushers-in-new-age-of-technology-and-innovation/ U.S. Navy

Welcome to Naval Station Norfolk, Future USS Gerald R. Ford

By Rear Adm. Bruce H. Lindsey
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

Future USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) completed builders trials and arrived in her homeport, Naval Station Norfolk for the first time on April 14. The ship was able to complete all major builders trial evolutions, including high power runs and steering evolutions. Additionally, she conducted all ahead flank turns and I am told: “She turns nice!” First reports indicate overall the ship performed well.

NORFOLK (April 14, 2017) The aircraft carrier Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) pulls into Naval Station Norfolk for the first time.
NORFOLK (April 14, 2017) The aircraft carrier Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) pulls into Naval Station Norfolk for the first time.

 

As with any new class of ship, the builders trials allowed the engineers to actually observe how the new design operates in the envisioned environment and they learned a lot. But more importantly, the crew of the Gerald R. Ford operated the ship under numerous configurations, gaining valuable hands-on experience that only underway operations enable; everything from putting the rigid-hull inflatable boat into the water to simulate a rescue-at-sea to operating anti-submarine warfare equipment and tracking airborne aircraft. Even the sea and anchor detail that took the ship out and back into port was a valuable operational experience for the captain and the crew.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (April 9, 2017) Sailors assigned to the Pre-Commissioning Unit aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) prepare to launch a rigid-hull inflatable boat during a launch and recovery exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jason Pastrick/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (April 9, 2017) Sailors assigned to the Pre-Commissioning Unit aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) prepare to launch a rigid-hull inflatable boat during a launch and recovery exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jason Pastrick/Released)

Most Americans can agree that the threats to our country and our way of life are more complex than ever before. It is for this reason that we must continue to have not only a strong Navy but more importantly, we must have a strong striking capability in that Navy for deterrence and should deterrence fail, to fight and win our nation’s wars. That powerful striking capability resides predominately in our large deck nuclear-powered aircraft carriers with their embarked air wings consisting of F/A-18 E/F Super Hornets, EA-18G Growlers, E-2D Hawkeyes, MH-60R Sea Hawks, MH-60S Knight Hawks and the C-2 Greyhound.

Some critics ask why, in the current budget environment, are we investing in the Ford class carrier. The answer is simple – because the intrinsic, inherent and enduring value of the aircraft carrier as the striking arm of national power remains unmatched today and well into the foreseeable future. This is why we have large deck nuclear-powered aircraft carriers, the best aircraft and the best Sailors to man these large deck ships – so that we can deliver combat striking power and sea control anywhere, and at any time of the President’s choosing. That capability is resident only in United States large deck nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and their embarked air wings – it is what gives diplomacy its gravitas.

NORFOLK (April 14, 2017) The future USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) arrives at Naval Station Norfolk after returning from Builder's Sea Trials and seven days underway. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
NORFOLK (April 14, 2017) The future USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) arrives at Naval Station Norfolk after returning from Builder’s Sea Trials and seven days underway. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

 

Gerald R. Ford returned successfully from builders trials and she is a spectacular fighting machine. Among her many advancements, the new launch and recover equipment designed into Gerald R. Ford will allow the carrier to operate with future aviation platforms that are either lighter or heavier than those found in today’s air wing. She, along with her future air wing, will provide any President and Secretary of Defense all the gravitas required to reach lasting and peaceful accords for the next 50 years.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/04/17/welcome-to-naval-station-norfolk-future-uss-gerald-r-ford/ U.S. Navy