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Category Archives: Hurricane Harvey

AIRLANT’s Secret to Success for Hurricane Relief – Teamwork!

By Rear Adm. Bruce Lindsey
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

Between hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, nearly 170 Americans lost their lives this summer. Thousands of others lost their homes and all their possessions: clothing, furniture, pets and decades of memories. Our hearts and prayers go out to all those caught in the path of these deadly storms. We have seen tragedies like this play out before with hurricanes such as Andrew, Gustov and Katrina. Now Harvey, Irma and Maria join these names forever burned into our memories.

While all of these hurricanes resulted in death and destruction, they also have something else in common – the Navy was there to answer the call for help.

VIDOR, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, reassures a family after a rescue at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)
VIDOR, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, reassures a family after a rescue at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)

 

As Hurricane Harvey approached the shores of Texas, the Navy was called into action. HSC-7 Dusty Dogs and HSC-28 Dragon Whales were the first squadrons to arrive on station, tirelessly working around the clock through dangerous weather conditions to save lives. Often in the darkness of night, using night vision optics and infrared capabilities, the two squadrons saved hundreds of citizens from the rising flood waters.

All told, HSC-7 and HSC-28 flew 49 sorties accumulating 225 flight hours. They combined for 358 rescues while also saving 22 dogs and 5 cats, and delivering 1,660 lbs. of water, food and medical supplies. They were relieved Sept. 3 by our West Coast counterparts, HSC-21 Blackjacks and HSC-23 Wildcards, who continued flying search and rescue/logistics coverage during the day and stood the alert SAR overnight.

CARIBBEAN SEA (Sept. 7, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class John Malico and Aircrewman (Rescue Swimmer) 1st Class Erick Sotelo, both assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 22, help a mother and child during the U.S. Navy relief efforts in the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nathan Wilkes/Released)
CARIBBEAN SEA (Sept. 7, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class John Malico and Aircrewman (Rescue Swimmer) 1st Class Erick Sotelo, both assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 22, help a mother and child during the U.S. Navy relief efforts in the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nathan Wilkes/Released)

Less than two weeks later, Hurricane Irma came ashore in southern Florida leaving a trail of destruction as it moved north. The Florida Keys were amongst the hardest hit area with homes destroyed, boats sunk in channels and harbors, and power cut off to the thousands of stranded survivors. Without skipping a beat, the Navy was there to respond. Stationed aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), HSM-70 Spartans and HSC-28 Dragon Whales flew mission after mission to provide help delivering food, fresh water and medical supplies. To their south off the Florida Keys, HSC-22 Sea Knights joined in the efforts from aboard USS Wasp (LHD 1), who was accompanied by six HSC-28 MH-60S’s embarked in USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and four MH-60Rs, one aircraft each from HSM-40/46/48/74, embarked in USS New York (LPD 21).

As things were looking up for Florida, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico were in the crosshairs once again for a third hurricane. Maria was a Category 4 storm with winds gusting up to 156 mph. The devastation was massive and unprecedented.

In addition to our ships that were already in the area, four Norfolk-based squadrons completed a successful 1,400-mile cross-country flight to Puerto Rico. Nearly 200 personnel from HSC-5, HSC-7, HM-14, and HM-15 once again answered the call for the Navy. Their efforts are proving to be instrumental in bringing relief to those ravaged by the destructive power of Mother Nature.

As of Oct. 16, the Navy-Marine Corps team aboard USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), USS Wasp (LHD 1), USS Oak Hill (LSD 51), and the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit have conducted 68 MEDEVAC flights, logged roughly 920 flight hours in support of recovery operations, and delivered nearly 3.5 million lbs of relief supplies and cargo.

CENTRO COMMUNAL, Puerto Rico (Oct. 8, 2017) Lt. Dakota Davis, left, and Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Joseph Snyder, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), and a local volunteer unload drinking water from an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter for distribution to the citizens of Centro Communal, Puerto Rico. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dana Denice Legg/Released)
CENTRO COMMUNAL, Puerto Rico (Oct. 8, 2017) Lt. Dakota Davis, left, and Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Joseph Snyder, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), and a local volunteer unload drinking water from an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter for distribution to the citizens of Centro Communal, Puerto Rico. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dana Denice Legg/Released)

Whether it’s defending our nation or rushing to the aid of our citizens in distress, Americans can count on our Navy. This is why we have a Navy and why we constantly train to be ready on a moment’s notice. Our aviators, our air crews, our maintainers and our shipboard Sailors continue to make us proud with their professional and selfless service on the front lines of these storms, but we should also acknowledge the efforts of those in operations, maintenance, supply, public affairs, legal, medical and countless other departments.

Naval Aviation is a TEAM sport and the team is STRONG.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/10/17/airlants-secret-to-success-for-hurricane-relief-teamwork/ U.S. Navy

Special Report: Hurricane Harvey Relief Support

U.S. Navy Sailors and assets are supporting federal, state and local authorities’ ongoing relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

Follow this page for updates.

 

HSC-7 Investigates Distress Call
Aug. 29

Sailors assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7 investigate a distress call at a home in College Station, Texas, during a search and rescue mission over the areas affected by Hurricane Harvey.

 

HSC-7 Prepares to Conduct Search and Rescue Mission
Aug. 30

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COLLEGE STATION, Texas (Aug. 30, 2017) Air Force Airmen assigned to the 48th Rescue Squadron load gear for a joint search and rescue operation throughout the areas affected by Hurricane Harvey utilizing Air Force small boats and Navy helicopters from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindah/Releasedl)
COLLEGE STATION, Texas (Aug. 30, 2017) Air Force Airmen assigned to the 48th Rescue Squadron load gear for a joint search and rescue operation throughout the areas affected by Hurricane Harvey utilizing Air Force small boats and Navy helicopters from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindah/Releasedl)
COLLEGE STATION, Texas (Aug. 30, 2017) Two MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopters attached to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7 prepare to launch with assigned crew members and Airmen from the 48th Rescue Squadron for joint search and rescue operations utilizing Air Force small boats throughout the areas affected by Hurricane Harvey. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl)
COLLEGE STATION, Texas (Aug. 30, 2017) Two MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopters attached to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7 prepare to launch with assigned crew members and Airmen from the 48th Rescue Squadron for joint search and rescue operations utilizing Air Force small boats throughout the areas affected by Hurricane Harvey. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl)
COLLEGE STATION, Texas (Aug. 30, 2017) Two MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopters assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7 return to College Station, Texas, after conducting search and rescue operations over the areas affected by Hurricane Harvey. HSC-7 sent personnel and aircraft to the area to bolster Northern Command's support of the Federal Emergency Management Agency's disaster response efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ernest R. Scott/Released)
COLLEGE STATION, Texas (Aug. 30, 2017) Two MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopters assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7 return to College Station, Texas, after conducting search and rescue operations over the areas affected by Hurricane Harvey. HSC-7 sent personnel and aircraft to the area to bolster Northern Command’s support of the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s disaster response efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ernest R. Scott/Released)
COLLEGE STATION, Texas (Aug. 30, 2017) Lt. Ben Bontrager, a pilot assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7, returns to College Station, Texas, after conducting search and rescue operations over the areas affected by Hurricane Harvey. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ernest R. Scott/Released)
COLLEGE STATION, Texas (Aug. 30, 2017) Lt. Ben Bontrager, a pilot assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7, returns to College Station, Texas, after conducting search and rescue operations over the areas affected by Hurricane Harvey. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ernest R. Scott/Released)
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Navy Squadrons Rescue 227 on First Day in Houston
Aug. 30

Two Navy helicopter squadron detachments relocated to Easterwood Airport Aug. 30 after making 227 helicopter rescues while flying from Fort Worth just yesterday.

The 112 Sailors from the Dusty Dogs and Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadrons (HSC) 7 and 28 (respectively) moved their staging site and six MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopters in order to be even closer to the disaster zone in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. The new site will allow for a drastically reduced response time.

Read more on Navy.mil.

 

USS Kearsarge and USS Oak Hill to Support Hurricane Harvey Relief
Aug. 30

Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, Adm. Phil Davidson, ordered the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) and dock landing ship USS Oak Hill (LSD 51) to get underway from their Norfolk, Va., homeports to support federal, state and local authorities ongoing relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

Read more on Navy.mil.

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NORFOLK (Aug. 30, 2017) Sailors attached to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202 and Assault Craft Unit (ACU 4) chock and chain a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement dump truck into final position aboard a landing craft, air cushion in preparation for onload to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward S. Kessler/Released)
NORFOLK (Aug. 30, 2017) Sailors attached to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202 and Assault Craft Unit (ACU 4) chock and chain a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement dump truck into final position aboard a landing craft, air cushion in preparation for onload to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward S. Kessler/Released)
NORFOLK (Aug. 30, 2017) Sailors attached to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202 and Assault Craft Unit (ACU 4) chock and chain a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement dump truck into final position aboard a landing craft, air cushion in preparation for onload to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward S. Kessler/Released)
NORFOLK (Aug. 30, 2017) Sailors attached to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202 and Assault Craft Unit (ACU 4) chock and chain a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement dump truck into final position aboard a landing craft, air cushion in preparation for onload to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward S. Kessler/Released)
NORFOLK (Aug. 30, 2017) Sailors attached to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202 and Assault Craft Unit (ACU 4) chock and chain a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement dump truck into final position aboard a landing craft, air cushion in preparation for onload to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward S. Kessler/Released)
NORFOLK (Aug. 30, 2017) Sailors attached to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202 and Assault Craft Unit (ACU 4) chock and chain a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement dump truck into final position aboard a landing craft, air cushion in preparation for onload to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward S. Kessler/Released)
NORFOLK (Aug. 30, 2017) Sailors attached to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202 and Assault Craft Unit (ACU 4) chock and chain a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement dump truck into final position aboard a landing craft, air cushion in preparation for onload to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward S. Kessler/Released)
NORFOLK (Aug. 30, 2017) Sailors attached to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202 and Assault Craft Unit (ACU 4) chock and chain a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement dump truck into final position aboard a landing craft, air cushion in preparation for onload to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward S. Kessler/Released)
NORFOLK (Aug. 30, 2017) Construction Mechanic Construction Apprentice Zachary Marble, attached to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202, and Aviation Electrician’s Mate 1st Class Alexandra Wong, attached to Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 4, chock and chain a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement dump truck into final position aboard a landing craft, air cushion in preparation for onload to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward S. Kessler/Released)
NORFOLK (Aug. 30, 2017) Construction Mechanic Construction Apprentice Zachary Marble, attached to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202, and Aviation Electrician’s Mate 1st Class Alexandra Wong, attached to Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 4, chock and chain a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement dump truck into final position aboard a landing craft, air cushion in preparation for onload to the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward S. Kessler/Released)
NORFOLK, Va. (Aug. 30, 2017) Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 26, from Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune N.C., load heavy equipment onto trailers at Camp Allen, Norfolk, Va. The Marines are preparing to travel aboard the USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) to assist with Hurricane Harvey relief efforts in Texas. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt Ryan O’Hare/Released)
NORFOLK, Va. (Aug. 30, 2017) Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 26, from Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune N.C., load heavy equipment onto trailers at Camp Allen, Norfolk, Va. The Marines are preparing to travel aboard the USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) to assist with Hurricane Harvey relief efforts in Texas. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt Ryan O’Hare/Released)
NORFOLK, Va. (Aug. 30, 2017) Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 26, from Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune N.C., load heavy equipment onto trailers at Camp Allen, Norfolk, Va. The Marines are preparing to travel aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) to assist with Hurricane Harvey relief efforts in Texas. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt Ryan O’Hare/Released)
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Navy Squadron Rescues Adults, Children, Dogs at Texas School
Aug. 31

Sailors from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28 rescued 14 people and four dogs, Aug. 31, at Pine Forrest Elementary School, in Vidor, Texas, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds.

Read more on Navy.mil.

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VIDOR, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Rion Johnson, a native of Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, assures a family of evacuees at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindah/Releasedl)
VIDOR, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Rion Johnson, a native of Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, assures a family of evacuees at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindah/Releasedl)

170831-N-KL846-117 VIDOR, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, counts a group of people at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)
VIDOR, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, counts a group of people at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)

170831-N-KL846-150 VIDOR, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, rescues two dogs at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)
VIDOR, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, rescues two dogs at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)

170831-N-KL846-152 VIDOR, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, reassures a family after a rescue at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)
VIDOR, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, reassures a family after a rescue at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)

170831-N-KL846-163 BEAUMONT, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Evacuees show appreciation to Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, after a rescue at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)
BEAUMONT, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Evacuees show appreciation to Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, after a rescue at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)

170831-N-KL846-171 BEAUMONT, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) A child shows appreciation to Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Rion Johnson, a native of Ponte Vedra Beach, Fl and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, after a group rescue of people and dogs at a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl)
BEAUMONT, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) A child shows appreciation to Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Rion Johnson, a native of Ponte Vedra Beach, Fl and assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, after a group rescue of people and dogs at a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds. The mission resulted in the rescue of seven adults, seven children and four dogs. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl)

170831-N-KL846-197 BEAUMONT, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Rion Johnson, a native of Ponte Vedra Beach, Fl, assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, assists with a medical evacuation during Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)
BEAUMONT, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Rion Johnson, a native of Ponte Vedra Beach, Fl, assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, assists with a medical evacuation during Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)

170831-N-KL846-210 JASPER, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Rion Johnson, a native of Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, both assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, assist with a medical evacuation during Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)
JASPER, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado and Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Rion Johnson, a native of Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, both assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, assist with a medical evacuation during Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)

170831-N-KL846-220 JASPER, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Rion Johnson, a native of Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, escorts an evacuee after a medical evacuation during Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)
JASPER, Texas (Aug. 31, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Rion Johnson, a native of Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28, escorts an evacuee after a medical evacuation during Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Released)

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USS Kearsarge and USS Oak Hill Depart to Assist Hurricane Harvey Relief Efforts
Aug. 31

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ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 31, 17) Sailors man the rails of the dock landing ship USS Oak Hill (LSD 51) in preparation to assist with disaster relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. U.S. Fleet Forces Command send personnel and assets to bolster Northern Command’s support of FEMA’s assistance to federal, state and local authority’s ongoing relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Taylor A. Elberg/Released)

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 31, 17) Sailors man the rails of the dock landing ship USS Oak Hill (LSD 51) in preparation to assist with disaster relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. U.S. Fleet Forces Command send personnel and assets to bolster Northern Command’s support of FEMA’s assistance to federal, state and local authority’s ongoing relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Taylor A. Elberg/Released)

NORFOLK, Va. (Aug 31, 2017) The amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) departs Naval Station Norfolk to support Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. U.S. military assets are supporting FEMA as well as state and local authorities in rescue and relief efforts in wake of Hurricane Harvey. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey J. Hopkins/Released)

NORFOLK, Va. (Aug 31, 2017) The amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) departs Naval Station Norfolk to support Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. U.S. military assets are supporting FEMA as well as state and local authorities in rescue and relief efforts in wake of Hurricane Harvey. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey J. Hopkins/Released)

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http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/09/01/special-report-hurricane-harvey-relief-support/ U.S. Navy

Kentucky, Mississippi ANG establish air hub for hurricane response

Airmen from the Kentucky and Mississippi Air National Guard established an aeromedical evacuation and air cargo hub Aug. 30, 2017, attaining mission-capable status within hours of their arrival at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston.

http://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1298219/kentucky-mississippi-ang-establish-air-hub-for-hurricane-response/ Staff Sgt. Joshua Horton

Oklahoma ANG wing sends aid for Hurricane Harvey

Approximately 40 Airmen from the Oklahoma Air National Guard’s 137th Special Operations Wing departed Will Rogers Air National Guard Base in Oklahoma City, Aug. 29, 2017, to support the Texas Military Department and Texas Emergency Management in relief efforts following Hurricane Harvey.

http://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1295451/oklahoma-ang-wing-sends-aid-for-hurricane-harvey/ Staff Sgt. Kasey M. Phipps

Rescue assets arrive in Fort Worth, Texas

The 347th Rescue Group mobilized to Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Aug. 26, 2017, in support of relief efforts due to Hurricane Harvey. HC-130J Combat King II, HH60G Pave Hawks from the 41st Rescue Squadron, and numerous personnel continue to support ongoing rescue efforts.

http://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1294919/rescue-assets-arrive-in-fort-worth-texas/ Tech. Sgt. Zachary Wolf and Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan

Hurricane Harvey

As Hurricane Harvey reaches the Gulf coast, we want to make sure all coastal Navy personnel and their family members know what to do before, during and after the storm.

If you aren’t in the storm’s path, it’s a good time to make sure you’re prepared for emergencies with tips from Ready Navy.

Follow this blog for additional information and updates.

Before

Be informed and know your hurricane terminology

  • Tropical depression: A system of clouds and thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and sustained winds that do not exceed 38 mph.
  • Tropical storm: A system of clouds and thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and sustained winds 39-73 mph.
  • Hurricane: A system of clouds and thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and sustained winds 74 mph or higher.
  • Storm surge: An abnormal rise of water pushed ashore by a storm, over and above the predicted astronomical tide. Storm surges, which are often the greatest threat to life and property, are affected by a number of complex factors and can vary in magnitude despite hurricane categories. For example, Hurricane Katrina, a category 3 hurricane, had a storm surge of 28 ft., while Hurricane Charley, a category 4 hurricane, had a storm surge of 6-8 ft.
  • Storm tide: A combination of storm surge with normal tide, increasing the amount of water (e.g., a 15-foot storm surge with a 2-foot normal tide creates a 17-foot storm tide).
  • Hurricane/tropical storm warning: Hurricane/tropical storm conditions are expected within 36 hours in specified areas.
  • Hurricane/tropical storm watch: Hurricane/tropical storm conditions are possible within 48 hours in specified areas. Stay tuned to radio or TV for further information.
  • Short-term watches and warnings: Provide detailed information about specific threats during hurricanes, such as flash flooding or tornadoes.

Understand the categorization of hurricanes

Categorization adapted from the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale courtesy of the National Hurricane Center

  • Category 1: Winds 74-95 mph, 64-82 kt, 119-153 km/h, very dangerous winds will produce some damage.
  • Category 2: Winds 96-110 mph, 83-95 kt, 154-177 km/h, extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage.
  • Category 3: Winds 111-129 mph, 96-112 kt, 178-208 km/h, devastating damage will occur.
  • Category 4: Winds 130-156 mph, 113-136 kt, 209-251 km/h, catastrophic damage will occur, well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of roof structure and/or some exterior walls.
  • Category 5: Winds exceeding 157 mph, 137 kt, 252 km/h, catastrophic damage will occur, high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed with total roof failure and wall collapse.Category 3, 4, and 5 hurricanes are considered “major hurricanes.”

Understand conditions of readiness

Tropical Cyclone Conditions of Readiness (TCCOR) are the Navy’s guidelines for estimating how long a region has and the actions necessary before it will be hit by destructive winds. Destructive winds are defined as winds of 58 mph or greater. At each TCCOR level, installations and tenant commands have set actions or checklists to complete prior to the storms arrival. These checklists range from verifying recall procedures to closing facilities and sandbagging. Essential supplies can quickly sell out when a major storm is forecasted to hit the region, so it is vital for personnel to prepare for damaging storms before they establish themselves in the news cycle.

  • TCCOR 5: Indicates that we are in hurricane season. From June 1 to November 30, all vulnerable installations should maintain at a minimum TCCOR 5 levels of readiness.
  • TCCOR 4: Trend indicates possible threats of destructive winds are indicated within 72 hours.
  • TCCOR 3: Destructive winds of force indicated are possible within 48 hours.
  • TCCOR 2: Destructive winds of force indicated are anticipated within 24 hours.
  • TCCOR 1: Destructive winds of force indicated are occurring or anticipated within 12 hours.

 

  • Ensure your information is current in the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS) at https://navyfamily.navy.mil.
  • Determine whether your property is in danger from tidal floods, storm surges, or dam failures, and take flood precautions.
  • Learn community evacuation routes and how to find higher ground.
  • Make a written family evacuation plan.
  • Make a written family communication plan in case you are separated. Keep in mind phone lines and cell phone towers may be down.
  • Make plans to secure your property:
    • Cover all of your home’s windows with permanent storm shutters, which offer the best protection for windows, or with 5/8” marine plywood, cut to fit and ready to install.
    • Install straps or additional clips to securely fasten your roof to the frame structure to reduce roof damage.
    • Trim trees and shrubs around your home so they are more wind resistant.
    • Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts.
    • Reinforce your garage doors to prevent dangerous and expensive structural damage.
    • Bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans, and anything else that is not tied down.
    • Build an emergency kit.

During

  • Avoid using the phone, except for serious emergencies.
  • Listen to the radio or TV for more information and further instructions.
  • Create a supply of water for sanitary and household purposes by filling bathtub and large containers.
  • Turn your refrigerator to the coldest setting and keep the door closed.
  • Turn off propane tanks, and utilities, if told to do so.
  • Moor your boat if time permits.

You should evacuate under the following conditions

  • If you live in a mobile home or temporary structure—such shelters are particularly hazardous during a hurricane no matter how well fastened to the ground.
  • If you live in a high-rise building—hurricane winds are stronger at higher elevations.
  • If you live on the coast, on a floodplain, near a river, or on an island waterway.
  • If told to do so by local authorities, following their instructions.

If you are told to evacuate

  • Never ignore an evacuation order.
  • Follow instructions and the guidelines given regarding times and routes.
  • Take only essential items and your emergency kit.
  • Turn off gas, electricity, and water if you have not already done so.
  • Disconnect all appliances.
  • Make sure your car’s gas tank is full.
  • Do not walk in moving water.
  • Do not drive in high water. (As little as six inches of water can cause loss of control and stalling of a vehicle).
  • Follow the designated evacuation plan and expect a high volume of traffic.

If you are not told to or cannot evacuate

  • Stay tuned to emergency stations on TV or radio.
  • Listen for further instructions.
  • Avoid elevators.
  • Seek shelter in a small interior room on the lowest level such as a bathroom, closet, or basement.
  • Stay away from glass, windows, and doors.
  • Lie on the floor under a table or another sturdy object.
  • Do not go outside until instructed to do so even if the storm is over and it seems calm. This could be the eye of the storm passing, and winds will pick up again.
  • When given the all clear, prepare to evacuate to a shelter or neighbor’s home if your home is damaged.
  • Once you are in a safe place, muster with your command if you are military or civilian personnel or a member of the selective reserves.

After

  • Listen to news reports to make sure water supplies are not contaminated.
  • Stay clear of flood waters (standing and moving) as they may be contaminated or deeper than expected.
  • Beware of downed power lines.
  • Avoid any roads where flood waters have receded as they may have weakened and could collapse under the weight of a car.
  • Be extremely cautious when entering buildings and homes as there may be unseen damage.
  • Clean and disinfect everything that was touched by flood water, as it can contain sewage and other contaminants.
  • After a declared emergency, register your needs with the Navy through the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS) at https://navyfamily.navy.mil or call 1-877-414-5358 or 1-866-297-1971 (TDD).

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/08/25/hurricane-harvey/ U.S. Navy