Visitors at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum were delightfully surprised when their tour of the displays was suddenly interrupted by members of the U.S. Air Force Band and Honor Guard as they kicked off the holiday season with their fourth annual holiday flash mob Nov. 29.
Visitors at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum were delightfully surprised when their tour of the displays was suddenly interrupted by members of the U.S. Air Force Band and Honor Guard as they kicked off the holiday season with their fourth annual holiday flash mob Nov. 29.
Secretary of Defense Ash Carter announced today that the president has made the following
When it comes to aviation fuel, the C-17 Globemaster III utilization rate makes it stand out as the largest consumer in the Air Force. This is why a team at the 418th Flight Test Squadron has been working for the past year on the Air Force Research Laboratory’s C-17 Drag Reduction Program.

When it comes to aviation fuel, the C-17 Globemaster III utilization rate makes it stand out as the largest consumer in the Air Force. This is why a team at the 418th Flight Test Squadron has been working for the past year on the Air Force Research Laboratory’s C-17 Drag Reduction Program.

Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.

ARABIAN GULF: An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Gunslingers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 105 taxis across the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anderson Branch)
ARABIAN GULF: An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Gunslingers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 105 taxis across the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anderson Branch)
PHILIPPINE SEA: A B-1 bomber from the 34th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron leads a formation with fighters in front of U.S. Navy and Japanese surface vessels during Exercise Keen Sword 17, off the coasts of Japan, Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan Burke/Released)
PHILIPPINE SEA: A B-1 bomber from the 34th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron leads a formation with fighters in front of U.S. Navy and Japanese surface vessels during Exercise Keen Sword 17, off the coasts of Japan, Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan Burke/Released)
ARABIAN GULF: An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Sidewinders of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 86 is tied down to the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) prior to flight operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard)
ARABIAN GULF: An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Sidewinders of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 86 is tied down to the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) prior to flight operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard)
YOKOSUKA, Japan: Sailors stage tow tractors for offload from the flight deck of the Navy's only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), for transport to Naval Air Facility, Atsugi, after completing a scheduled three-month patrol in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Erwin Jacob Villavicencio Miciano/Released)
YOKOSUKA, Japan: Sailors stage tow tractors for offload from the flight deck of the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), for transport to Naval Air Facility, Atsugi, after completing a scheduled three-month patrol in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Erwin Jacob Villavicencio Miciano/Released)
ARABIAN GULF: The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) receives fuel from the fast combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8) during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Cole KellerReleased)
ARABIAN GULF: The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) receives fuel from the fast combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8) during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Cole KellerReleased)
FUNCHAL, Portugal: Guided-missile destroyer USS Mahan (DDG 72) stops for fuel in Funchal, Portugal . (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Timothy Comerford/Released )
FUNCHAL, Portugal: Guided-missile destroyer USS Mahan (DDG 72) stops for fuel in Funchal, Portugal . (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Timothy Comerford/Released )
ARABIAN GULF: Sailors prepare to lower nautical flags signifying the turnover of Combined Task Force (CTF) 50 on vulture's row of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anderson W. Branch)
ARABIAN GULF: Sailors prepare to lower nautical flags signifying the turnover of Combined Task Force (CTF) 50 on vulture’s row of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anderson W. Branch)
PHILIPPINE SEA: An MH-60S Sea Hawk from the “Island Knights” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 25, transports cargo pendants from the USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10), to the flight deck of the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during an ammunition offload. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan Burke/Released)
PHILIPPINE SEA: An MH-60S Sea Hawk from the “Island Knights” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 25, transports cargo pendants from the USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10), to the flight deck of the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during an ammunition offload. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan Burke/Released)
ARABIAN GULF: The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) approaches the Royal Navy ship HMS Ocean (L12). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anderson W. Branch)
ARABIAN GULF: The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) approaches the Royal Navy ship HMS Ocean (L12). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anderson W. Branch)
U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS: The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) and the guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56) conduct a routine, scheduled transit. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Christopher A. Michaels)
U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS: The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) and the guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56) conduct a routine, scheduled transit. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Christopher A. Michaels)
ARABIAN GULF: Three F/A-18 Super Hornets fly above the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anderson W. Branch)
ARABIAN GULF: Three F/A-18 Super Hornets fly above the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anderson W. Branch)
FUNCHAL, Portugal: Sailors stand sea and anchor detail and security watches aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Mahan (DDG 72) as they depart Funchal, Portugal after a brief stop for fuel. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Timothy Comerford/Released)
FUNCHAL, Portugal: Sailors stand sea and anchor detail and security watches aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Mahan (DDG 72) as they depart Funchal, Portugal after a brief stop for fuel. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Timothy Comerford/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !

 

By Rear Adm. Ann Burkhardt
Director, 21st Century Sailor Office

Suicide is a tragedy that extends beyond individual Sailors. It affects divisions, commands and the entire Navy family. Each loss is one too many. While much work has been done to understand the underlying causes of suicide, it is a complex issue that confronts our society as a whole, not just those of us in uniform.

ARABIAN GULF (Aug. 26, 2016) Sailors on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) participate in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk to increase awareness for suicide prevention. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard)
ARABIAN GULF (Aug. 26, 2016) Sailors on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) participate in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk to increase awareness for suicide prevention. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard)

Over the past few years we have worked hard to strengthen our prevention and intervention strategies. In September 2015, we launched “1 Small ACT,” which is focused on people connecting with people. It advocates the importance of small acts of caring – getting to know each other and showing Sailors that you care. Additionally, this past fall we announced the creation of a new suicide prevention program known as Sailor Assistance and Intercept for Life (SAIL), which is aimed at supplementing existing mental health treatment by providing continual support through the first 90 days after suicide-related behavior.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 30, 2016) Lt. Luke Dundon, assistant command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Weapons Department Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeanette Mullinax/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 30, 2016) Lt. Luke Dundon, assistant command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Weapons Department Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jeanette Mullinax/Released)

However, anyone can be at risk for suicide as we face life’s challenges, even the toughest among us. And while Sailors pride themselves on their mental, physical and spiritual toughness, as they should, all of us go through challenges that can be difficult to talk about.

That’s why it’s imperative that we as Sailors, as individuals and as friends, look out for each other, recognize that something may not be right and then step in.

Right now, in your division, your department or your command, there is someone that may need your help, who is struggling with stress or having thoughts of suicide.

It’s important to recognize that suicides typically occur when Sailors are experiencing some combination of recent multiple stressors, including relationship problems, personal or professional loss, recent career transitions, disciplinary / legal issues and financial strain. We cannot ignore the harmful effects of poor self-care, prolonged stress and chronic sleep deprivation that can be catalysts for or results of such challenges.

Talking about our challenges, whether they’re operational, social or psychological in nature, makes us all better as a team and helps us create a climate of trust, which encourages Sailors to come forward and seek help in times of need.

This issue doesn’t end with one conversation, a momentary action or a change of policy. And it cannot be something we only think about one month out of the year. It’s a daily effort 24/7/365.  Be there for every Sailor, every day.

PHILIPPINE SEA (Aug. 26, 2016) Cmdr. Curtis Price, command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)
PHILIPPINE SEA (Aug. 26, 2016) Cmdr. Curtis Price, command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

Furthermore, it’s the responsibility of Navy leaders to set a tone within our commands where Sailors have the courage to ask for help and when they do, they get the right resources and support they need. This requires that we all have awareness of the services provided by your local and embedded mental healthcare providers, Fleet and Family Support Centers, Military OneSource and the absolute confidentiality of our Navy Chaplain Corps.

Talk to your shipmates. Ask them how they’re doing. Open the dialogue. It’s our duty to strengthen our Navy team, today and into the future, one Sailor at a time.

Assistance is always available. Call the Military Crisis Line at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), www.militarycrisisline.net or text 838255 for free confidential support 24 / 7.

By Rear Adm. Ann Burkhardt
Director, 21st Century Sailor Office

Suicide is a tragedy that extends beyond individual Sailors. It affects divisions, commands and the entire Navy family. Each loss is one too many. While much work has been done to understand the underlying causes of suicide, it is a complex issue that confronts our society as a whole, not just those of us in uniform.

ARABIAN GULF (Aug. 26, 2016) Sailors on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) participate in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk to increase awareness for suicide prevention. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard)
ARABIAN GULF (Aug. 26, 2016) Sailors on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) participate in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk to increase awareness for suicide prevention. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard)

Over the past few years we have worked hard to strengthen our prevention and intervention strategies. In September 2015, we launched “1 Small ACT,” which is focused on people connecting with people. It advocates the importance of small acts of caring – getting to know each other and showing Sailors that you care. Additionally, this past fall we announced the creation of a new suicide prevention program known as Sailor Assistance and Intercept for Life (SAIL), which is aimed at supplementing existing mental health treatment by providing continual support through the first 90 days after suicide-related behavior.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 30, 2016) Lt. Luke Dundon, assistant command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Weapons Department Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeanette Mullinax/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 30, 2016) Lt. Luke Dundon, assistant command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Weapons Department Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jeanette Mullinax/Released)

However, anyone can be at risk for suicide as we face life’s challenges, even the toughest among us. And while Sailors pride themselves on their mental, physical and spiritual toughness, as they should, all of us go through challenges that can be difficult to talk about.

That’s why it’s imperative that we as Sailors, as individuals and as friends, look out for each other, recognize that something may not be right and then step in.

Right now, in your division, your department or your command, there is someone that may need your help, who is struggling with stress or having thoughts of suicide.

It’s important to recognize that suicides typically occur when Sailors are experiencing some combination of recent multiple stressors, including relationship problems, personal or professional loss, recent career transitions, disciplinary / legal issues and financial strain. We cannot ignore the harmful effects of poor self-care, prolonged stress and chronic sleep deprivation that can be catalysts for or results of such challenges.

Talking about our challenges, whether they’re operational, social or psychological in nature, makes us all better as a team and helps us create a climate of trust, which encourages Sailors to come forward and seek help in times of need.

This issue doesn’t end with one conversation, a momentary action or a change of policy. And it cannot be something we only think about one month out of the year. It’s a daily effort 24/7/365.  Be there for every Sailor, every day.

PHILIPPINE SEA (Aug. 26, 2016) Cmdr. Curtis Price, command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)
PHILIPPINE SEA (Aug. 26, 2016) Cmdr. Curtis Price, command chaplain of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), speaks to Sailors during an interactive Suicide Awareness and Prevention training session. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

Furthermore, it’s the responsibility of Navy leaders to set a tone within our commands where Sailors have the courage to ask for help and when they do, they get the right resources and support they need. This requires that we all have awareness of the services provided by your local and embedded mental healthcare providers, Fleet and Family Support Centers, Military OneSource and the absolute confidentiality of our Navy Chaplain Corps.

Talk to your shipmates. Ask them how they’re doing. Open the dialogue. It’s our duty to strengthen our Navy team, today and into the future, one Sailor at a time.

Assistance is always available. Call the Military Crisis Line at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), www.militarycrisisline.net or text 838255 for free confidential support 24 / 7.

Close to Home: A Family Business Planning Series by The Coughlin Group

ERC's preferred partner, The Coughlin Group, recently posted an article series titled Close to Home, which discusses how family businesses need clarity of vision, mission, and values in addition to a focused business plan and a system to measure results. A summary of that series is below:

Focusing on the Family Enterprise, The Coughlin Group notes that in order to begin clarifying an organization’s vision, mission, and values, start by asking the right questions. In the first article in Close to Home, there is an emphasis on the importance of planning.

It is noted that “...it is the sense of connection and identity with family that drives their motivation for growth and prosperity. This can be an advantage when it comes to planning, since family businesses often have a long-term strategic outlook due to their owner’s motivation to create a legacy for generations to come.”

Planning for family businesses is crucial due to the potential effects on personal relationships. When a plan is set, this lowers the likelihood of miscommunications or misalignment of expectations.

In order to create clarity, answer these three questions:

  1. Why does this company exist?
  2. What are our core values?
  3. What are we building?

Part two of the Close to Home series discusses how important it is to focus behaviors for family business planning. The article mentions that “a business plan not only helps insure the financial viability of the family business—but perhaps more importantly—protects the family relationships.”

Once a business plan is created, “focusing behaviors is critical to the implementation.” By focusing behaviors, the management team is able to make decisions on how to dedicate their resources and time.

It’s also important for family businesses to define what game-changing initiatives will help drive the execution from the strategy. Without these game-changers, a capacity for sustainable future growth will be unlikely.

The third part of The Coughlin Group’s article series discusses how “putting a system in place to help family members measure results is critical to maintaining health, productive relationships within the business and family.”

This focus on measuring results in highly influenced by trust. When trust is lost it, it rattles the business and the family. To avoid this be sure to include clear and tangible measurements in the planning process.

Another noteworthy portion of the last leg of the article series is about building the system. The Coughlin Group states that “the first step for creating an effective measurement system is choosing a system to document and track the implementation of the business plan.” It is important to have a tracking system for the implementation process to avoid conflicts about accountabilities and commitments.