The III Marine Expeditionary Force commander, Lt. Gen. Lawrence Nicholson, announced a temporary

A U.S. Marine Corps AV-8B Harrier pilot ejected safely from his aircraft today at approximately 2:00 p.m. off the coast of Okinawa.

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of Recruit Training Command’s graduation, Pass-In Review. It is a formal military ceremony that honors a Sailor’s hard work and dedication to a new way of life. Pass-In-Review also ties together the future of the Navy with our long-held naval traditions and customs.

Read how Recruit Training Command transforms civilians into Sailors – 38,000 of them each year.

On Aug. 18, 2015, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced the establishment of a Recruit Honor Graduate Ribbon for superior performance during the Navy’s basic military training, held at Naval Station Great Lakes, Illinois.

The live video from the Navy’s only boot camp at Great Lakes, Illinois, is scheduled to begin 8:45 a.m. CDT Sept. 9.

Congratulations Sailors and welcome aboard to the newest members of our Navy family!

Join the #USNavy conversation on social media on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube, and Flickr.

Congratulate the Navy’s newest Sailors by leaving a comment below.

For some people, Enterprise is the ship that comes to mind when they think about the U.S. Navy.

However, for fans of the TV show Star Trek – Trekkies, Enterprise is synonymous with the fictional starship by the same name and “its five-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before.”

On this day, 50 years after the show’s premiere, we’re looking back at our Enterprise by the numbers.

1775

The name Enterprise is as old as the U.S. Navy. The first Enterprise ship was captured from the British by Benedict Arnold in May 1775. CVN-65 was the eighth ship with the name Enterprise in the history of the U.S. Navy.

The first Enterprise originally belonged to the British and cruised on Lake Champlain to supply their posts in Canada. After the capture of Fort Ticonderoga by the Americans on May 10, 1775, it became the object of desire in the mind of Benedict Arnold who realized he would not have control of Lake Champlain until its capture.

The first Enterprise originally belonged to the British and cruised on Lake Champlain to supply their posts in Canada. After the capture of Fort Ticonderoga by the Americans on May 10, 1775, it became the object of desire in the mind of Benedict Arnold who realized he would not have control of Lake Champlain until its capture.


1,123

The length of the Enterprise in feet, making it the longest ship in history. Over 800 companies provided building supplies, which included 60,923 tons of steel, 1507 tons of aluminum, 230 miles of pipe and tubing and 1700 tons of one-quarter-inch welding rods.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 23, 2012) An E-2C Hawkeye assigned to the Screwtops of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 123 flies past the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) during an air power demonstration. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Pittman/Released)

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 23, 2012) An E-2C Hawkeye assigned to the Screwtops of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 123 flies past the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) during an air power demonstration. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Pittman/Released)


8

The number of nuclear reactors aboard Enterprise, which was the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. The reactors generated more than 200,000 horsepower.

At sea aboard USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Nov. 5, 2001-- Sailors aboard USS Enterprise spell out "E = MC2x40" on the carrier's flight deck to mark forty years of U.S. Naval nuclear power as ship and crew return home from a Mediterranean Sea Arand abian Gulf deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Enterprise currently in dry dock at the Naval Shipyards in Norfolk, Va. U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Douglass M. Pearlman. (RELEASED)

At sea aboard USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Nov. 5, 2001– Sailors aboard USS Enterprise spell out “E = MC2x40” on the carrier’s flight deck to mark forty years of U.S. Naval nuclear power as ship and crew return home from a Mediterranean Sea Arand abian Gulf deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Enterprise currently in dry dock at the Naval Shipyards in Norfolk, Va. U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Douglass M. Pearlman. (RELEASED)


100,000

The number of Sailors and Marines who served aboard Enterprise, which had 23 different commanding officers.

NORFOLK (Nov. 30, 2012) Master Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate Eric Young reenlists on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick C. Scott/Released)

NORFOLK (Nov. 30, 2012) Master Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Eric Young reenlists on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick C. Scott/Released)


1962

Within one year of its commissioning, President John Kennedy dispatched Enterprise to blockade Cuba and prevent the Soviet delivery of missiles to the island.

WASHINGTON (April 16, 2013) The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) transits the Arabian Gulf. Enterprise was one of several ships that participated in Operation Praying Mantis, which was launched after the guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) struck an Iranian mine on April 14, 1988. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Todd Cichonowicz/Released)

WASHINGTON (April 16, 2013) The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) transits the Arabian Gulf. Enterprise was one of several ships that participated in Operation Praying Mantis, which was launched after the guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) struck an Iranian mine on April 14, 1988. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Todd Cichonowicz/Released)


2001

Enterprise was returning from a long deployment when terrorists attacked the U.S. on September 11. Without waiting for orders, Enterprise returned to the Arabian Gulf and later launched one of the first strikes against al-Qaida in Afghanistan. The ship expended more than 800,000 pounds of ordnance during Operation Enduring Freedom.

At sea aboard USS Enterprise (Oct. 18, 2001) -- U.S. Navy sailors inspect AGM-65 "Maverick" air-to-surface tactical missiles on the flight deck of USS Enterprise (CVN 65) in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Apprentice Lance H. Mayhew Jr. (RELEASED)

At sea aboard USS Enterprise (Oct. 18, 2001) — U.S. Navy sailors inspect AGM-65 “Maverick” air-to-surface tactical missiles on the flight deck of USS Enterprise (CVN 65) in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer’s Mate Airman Apprentice Lance H. Mayhew Jr. (RELEASED)


25

The number of deployments made by Enterprise, which traveled to the Mediterranean Sea, Pacific Ocean and the Middle East, and served in nearly every major conflict that occurred during her history.

NORFOLK (Nov. 4, 2012) The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) arrives at Naval Station Norfolk. Enterprise's return to Norfolk will be the 25th and final homecoming of her 51 years of distinguished service. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Rafael Martie/Released)

NORFOLK (Nov. 4, 2012) The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) arrives at Naval Station Norfolk. Enterprise’s return to Norfolk will be the 25th and final homecoming of her 51 years of distinguished service. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Rafael Martie/Released)


400,000

The number of arrested landings recorded aboard Enterprise as of May 2011, the fourth aircraft carrier to perform such a feat.

ARABIAN SEA (May 24, 2011) An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the Red Rippers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11 makes the 400,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex R. Forster/Released)

ARABIAN SEA (May 24, 2011) An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the Red Rippers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11 makes the 400,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex R. Forster/Released)


51

Enterprise’s years of active service, which ended December 1, 2012. Enterprise was one of the longest active-duty ships in the history of the Navy.

NORFOLK (Dec. 1, 2012) Guests observe the inactivation ceremony of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65). Enterprise was commissioned Nov. 25, 1961 as the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. The ceremony marks the end of her 51 years of service. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Joshua E. Walters/Released)

NORFOLK (Dec. 1, 2012) Guests observe the inactivation ceremony of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65). Enterprise was commissioned Nov. 25, 1961 as the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. The ceremony marks the end of her 51 years of service. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Joshua E. Walters/Released)


80

During CVN-65’s inactivation ceremony on Dec. 1, 2012, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced in a video message that the name Enterprise will live on as the officially passed the name to CVN-80, the third Ford class carrier and the ninth ship in the U.S. Navy to bear the name.

Graphic of ships named Enterprise

Graphic of ships named Enterprise (U.S. Navy graphic by MC1 Arif Patani/Released)

What are you memories of our Enterprise? Share them in the comments below.

By Capt. James A. Kirk
Commanding officer, PCU Zumwalt (DDG 1000)

With the last line taken in, PCU Zumwalt (DDG 1000) eased away from the pier and set sail from Bath, Maine, today, to join the Fleet – culminating years of effort by thousands of people. For Zumwalt’s crew, the call over the general announcing system, “Underway, shift colors” signaled the end of more than three years of training across the country in classrooms, labs and on the ship as our Navy’s next generation destroyer was being activated and tested. It marks the beginning of the ship’s life at-sea with Sailors at the helm.

BATH, Maine (Sept. 7, 2016) Facebook Live video from the Navy’s Facebook page of the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced surface ship, future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) departing Bath Iron Works to begin its 3-month journey to its new homeport in San Diego. (U.S Navy video/Released)

Since the beginning of 2013, 147 Sailors from across the U.S. and all walks of life have reported for duty to our pre-commissioning unit to train and ready themselves to take DDG-1000 to sea in service to their nation. To walk through the passageways of the mighty Zumwalt and see the diversity and richness of culture reflected in our ship’s Sailors affirms the ideal that inclusion strengthens our Navy as a warfighting force. The warfighters who serve aboard this ship are the living legacy of our namesake, Adm. Elmo R. “Bud” Zumwalt Jr., who dedicated his life to excellence and equality.

Our crew embodies Adm. Zumwalt’s innovative spirit. Each Sailor stands ready to adapt and master our ship’s new technology and provide operational commanders a lethal and precise instrument of naval power. Their technical expertise, teamwork and toughness –forged through training and years of experience at sea –have been on display since the Navy took custody of the ship May 20, 2016. Throughout the summer, our crew smartly executed move aboard, a series of inspections and assessments across the spectrum of operations, an engineering light off assessment and crew certifications without a hitch.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dec. 7, 2015)  The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is underway for the first time conducting at-sea tests and trials in the Atlantic Ocean.  (U.S. Navy video courtesy of General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Released)

New construction duty is challenging. It is even more so when the ship is the first in a new class with new and advanced technologies being put to sea for the first time. Our crew has taken on every challenge and conquered. These plankowners will be a part of the ship’s legacy for as long as USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) sails. They can take pride in the fact that they began the winning tradition and paved the way for future generations to succeed.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (April 21, 2016) The future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) transits the Atlantic Ocean during acceptance trials with the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). (U.S. Navy/Released)

ATLANTIC OCEAN (April 21, 2016) The future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) transits the Atlantic Ocean during acceptance trials with the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). (U.S. Navy/Released)

As Vice Adm. Thomas Rowden, commander, Naval Surface Force, said about our team’s resiliency during his August visit to the ship, “Shipbuilding is a tough and frustrating job, and I’m proud of how you’ve been able to not only take care of the ship, but also take care of each other.”

In departing Bath, Maine, the door closed on the first chapter of the Zumwalt’s life. After commissioning in Baltimore, Maryland, on October 15, the ship will sail to its homeport in San Diego, California. Soon after arriving, DDG-1000 will enter a post-delivery industrial availability and mission systems activation period to ready this stealth destroyer for operational testing and its maiden deployment. With all the new technology, there will undoubtedly be challenges along the way, but Zumwalt’s Sailors are exactly the right team to succeed. They are highly skilled technicians and team players who have the toughness to get the job done. I am humbled and privileged to serve alongside these men and women.

Pax Propter Vim – Peace Through Power

Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.

ARABIAN SEA: Sailors assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87) retrieve a torpedo from the water during anti-submarine warfare exercises. Mason, deployed as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group, is supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Janweb B. Lagazo)

ARABIAN SEA: Sailors assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87) retrieve a torpedo from the water during anti-submarine warfare exercises. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Janweb B. Lagazo)

JEBEL ALI, United Arab Emirates: The Los Angeles-class Fast-Attack submarine USS Dallas (SSN 700) is escorted to pull alongside the submarine tender USS Frank Cable (AS 40), while pulling into port. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Alana Langdon/Released)

JEBEL ALI, United Arab Emirates: The Los Angeles-class Fast-Attack submarine USS Dallas (SSN 700) is escorted to pull alongside the submarine tender USS Frank Cable (AS 40), while pulling into port. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Alana Langdon/Released)

ARABIAN GULF: U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Edward Dorman, director for logistics at U.S. Central Command, departs one of Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 4's 34-foot patrol boat after a tour of its capabilities in U.S. 5th Fleet. The coastal riverine force is a core Navy capability that provides port and harbor security, high value asset protection, and maritime security operations in coastal and inland waterways. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean Furey)

ARABIAN GULF: U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Edward Dorman, director for logistics at U.S. Central Command, departs one of Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 4’s 34-foot patrol boat after a tour of its capabilities in U.S. 5th Fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean Furey)

GULF OF OMAN: Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Eric Khabbaz,  from Orange, Calif., signals the movement of palettes from the midships of the guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87) to the auxiliary oiler replenishment ship RFA Fort Victoria (A 387). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Janweb B. Lagazo)

GULF OF OMAN: Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Eric Khabbaz, from Orange, Calif., signals the movement of palettes from the midships of the guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87) to the auxiliary oiler replenishment ship RFA Fort Victoria (A 387). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Janweb B. Lagazo)

YOKOSUKA, Japan: Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 Sailors stack equipment and personal gear on the flight deck of the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jamaal Liddell/Released)

YOKOSUKA, Japan: Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 Sailors stack equipment and personal gear on the flight deck of the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jamaal Liddell/Released)

ARABIAN GULF: Sailors conduct flight operations on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Dartez C. Williams)

ARABIAN GULF: Sailors conduct flight operations on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Dartez C. Williams)

WATERS SOUTH OF JAPAN: Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class (AW/SW) Sarah Atiyyat, from Edison, New Jersey, gives the signal to the elevator operator to lower elevator one in the hangar bay of the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jamaal Liddell/Released)

WATERS SOUTH OF JAPAN: Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class (AW/SW) Sarah Atiyyat, from Edison, New Jersey, gives the signal to the elevator operator to lower elevator one in the hangar bay of the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jamaal Liddell/Released)

ARABIAN GULF: An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Gunslingers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 105 prepares to launch from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Nathan T. Beard)

ARABIAN GULF: An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Gunslingers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 105 prepares to launch from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Nathan T. Beard)

EAST CHINA SEA: Amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) transits the waters during her fall deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

EAST CHINA SEA: Amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) transits the waters during her fall deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

ARABIAN GULF: Capt. Paul “Speedy” Spedero Jr., commanding officer of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike), and Lt. William Fletcher, pilot an F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the Fighting Swordsmen of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 32 as it taxis across the flight deck. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Nathan T. Beard)

ARABIAN GULF: Capt. Paul “Speedy” Spedero Jr., commanding officer of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike), and Lt. William Fletcher, pilot an F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the Fighting Swordsmen of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 32 as it taxis across the flight deck. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Nathan T. Beard)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter picks up pallets from the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198) during a replenishment-at-sea aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael Molina/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter picks up pallets from the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198) during a replenishment-at-sea aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael Molina/Released)

ARABIAN GULF: Sailors on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) participate in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk to increase awareness for suicide prevention. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey J. Hopkins)

ARABIAN GULF: Sailors on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) participate in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk to increase awareness for suicide prevention. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey J. Hopkins)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !

By Rear Adm. Ron Boxall
Director, Surface Warfare (OPNAV N96)

Shipmates and friends,

Hello from the hallowed halls of the Pentagon! Last month, I relieved Rear Adm. Pete Fanta as director, Surface Warfare (N96). Pete, like those before him, has done a lot of heavy lifting to ensure that our surface force has what it needs to keep our ships, systems and Sailors resourced to the best of our ability. And through his adroit leadership, I believe our surface forces are bearing the fruits of his hard work and that we are making great progress in bringing offensive “punch” back into our surface fleet. I am excited to take the torch.

I am a “repeat offender” to the OPNAV staff. This will be my 4th OPNAV tour, and my 6th Pentagon tour — all since my first command tour aboard USS Carney (DDG 64). It is hard to believe that I was the deputy N96 for now-Vice Adm. Tom Rowden just three years ago. I am heartened to see that we have made great strides in some areas, and in others, we continue to push the ball down the field. But by leaving for a few years, you get to see “snapshot” views of the progress that aren’t always evident in the glacial pace of day-to-day operations. We have to work harder to accelerate the speed with which we get new technology to the fleet. And we will try to do just that.

WATERS SURROUNDING THE KOREAN PENINSULA (March 24, 2016) - Ships assigned to the John C. Stennis Strike Group and ships assigned to the Republic of Korea (ROK) Navy 1st Fleet Maritime Battle Group One steam together during Maritime Counter Special Operations Force (MCSOF) exercise, which is part of Foal Eagle 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Andre T. Richard/ Released)

WATERS SURROUNDING THE KOREAN PENINSULA (March 24, 2016) – Ships assigned to the John C. Stennis Strike Group and ships assigned to the Republic of Korea (ROK) Navy 1st Fleet Maritime Battle Group One steam together during Maritime Counter Special Operations Force (MCSOF) exercise, which is part of Foal Eagle 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Andre T. Richard/ Released)

Before coming to OPNAV, I served as the deployed commander of Carrier Strike Group 3, the John C. Stennis Strike Group (JCSSG), which included the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), Carrier Air Wing 9, Destroyer Squadron 21, the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110), USS Stockdale (DDG 106) and USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93). Our Sailors performed brilliantly, as they always do. As we sailed the waters off Korea and in the South China Sea, it hit home — we must have more offensive punch. We need longer range weapons that pace the threats in the Pacific and elsewhere. The Distributed Lethality concept has to move from concept to reality — and fast. Surface ships and those of us who to go to sea in them need to refocus our pivotal role in being able to control the sea.

So it is those recent deployment experiences, combined with my surface warfare officer experiences over the past 30 years, that have helped shape my “Top 5” investment priorities for N96:

1. Aligning Investments to Sea Control and Distributed Lethality Priorities.

Our nation has returned to an era of great power competition. We must have a Navy that can provide more options to national leaders, from non-conflict operations to high-end combat at sea. Not only must we always be prepared to protect and defend ourselves, we must also remain ready to go on the offensive at a moment’s notice. We can achieve that balance through Distributed Lethality. While we work to maintain and increase our defensive resiliency, we’re going to increase and distribute our offensive power. By increasing the number of “shooters” on our team, we will complicate the defensive needs of any potential adversary, and we will be able to act on high-quality targeting data from a variety of sources.

2. Integrating New Ships and Capabilities in the Fleet.

The Surface Force is moving out with the next generation of surface combatants that will serve our nation now and into the second half of the 21st century. These include:

The first of its class, USS Zumwault (DDG 1000) will be commissioned this October. This technologically advanced warship will provide more offensive options to joint and maritime commanders while maintaining a sleek, stealthy profile that will make it more difficult for adversaries to target.

The Arleigh Burke-class destroyer program has been providing new ships to the Navy since 1991. Over the years, we’ve added capabilities (helicopters, increased VLS lethality, improved Aegis weapon system performance, SeaRAM) without the need for a new ship program and associated delays. The next step in this continuum of modernization is the DDG Flight III with the SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar, which is capable of operating in different environments and mission requirements against a variety of potential targets and profiles. Compared to the legacy SPY-1 radar, Air and Missile Defense Radar will be able to see an airborne object half as big and twice as far — and testing is proceeding apace at Pacific Missile Range Facility, where we have radiated at full power and cycle.

The LCS program continues to provide new small surface combatants to the fleet. These warships will play a vital role in the Navy’s core function of controlling the sea for the nation. In 2030, six out of every 10 warships the nation employs forward will be LCS/FF. The fleet commander of 2030 will face a multitude of challenges while operating forward, and the LCS/FF will be a key element of future adaptive force packages and surface action groups. Our warships must be ready to respond to actions of aggression with credible combat power that will convince potential adversaries that our nation will stand in the face of challenges to international order. The investments we are making in lethality and hardening today will enable LCS/FF warships to execute that role and enable us to control the sea and project power well into the future. We will continue to make improvements along the way — and will see LCS populating the waterfront in quickly growing numbers.

In late 2015, N96 began a future surface combatant capabilities based assessment to guide development of a holistic future surface combatant shipbuilding strategy. The intent of the study was to identify capability gaps as a result of CG 47, LCS, and DDG 51 Flight IIA eventual class retirements. The results of the capabilities based assessment are expected later this year and will be used to inform an initial capabilities document, which will serve as the basis for future surface combatant programs. As this effort progresses to an analysis of alternatives in FY18 and FY19, I intend to use a set based design approach to solving design challenges. That means we will consider a set of solutions rather than focusing on any one specific solution.

3. Continuing to Pace the Threat through Modernization.

The Surface Navy can deliver advanced warfighting capability through shipbuilding and modernization. Shipbuilding enables the Navy to develop and deliver advanced warfighting capability well beyond today’s current capability, but does require significant time from concept development to delivery (15-20 years). The surface modernization strategy enables the systematic introduction of existing and emerging technologies into the in-service fleet. Through modernization, critical warfighter capability gaps can be addressed more rapidly (three to five years), and the lethality of the Surface Force can be distributed across greater ranges without additional force structure.

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (June 24, 2016) The Arleigh Burke Class guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) follows in formation with the Ticonderoga-Class guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56) during an underway replenishment with the Fleet Replenishment Oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class J. Alexander Delgado/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (June 24, 2016) The Arleigh Burke Class guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) follows in formation with the Ticonderoga-Class guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56) during an underway replenishment with the Fleet Replenishment Oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class J. Alexander Delgado/Released)

Hull mechanical and electrical as well as combat systems modernizations will continue for Arleigh Burke destroyers in FY17. All newly modernized Aegis Baseline 9C DDGs will be Integrated Air and Missile Defense ships with Navy Integrated Fire Control – Counter Air capability and the most advanced BMD capability. All new construction DDG Flight IIA ships, beginning with DDG-113, will be delivered with Aegis Baseline 9C. Additional planned warfighting capabilities include: Identification Friend or Foe Mode 5, Close-In Weapons System Block 1B, Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program Block II, and the SQQ-89A (V) 15 Integrated Undersea Warfare Combat System Suite. Delivery of these capabilities will extend into the mid-term (2020-2030) and beyond.

The cruiser modernization plan ensures long-term capability for purpose-built air defense commander platforms. The Navy intends to operate 11 CGs (CG 52-62), of which 10 have been recently modernized, while modernizing the newest 11 ships (CG 63-73). The recently modernized CGs (CG 52-62, excluding CG 61) will receive Aegis Baseline 9 through back-fit, as these ships continue to support carrier strike group operations. As the newly modernized CGs (CG 63-73) return to the fleet, each will replace the older CGs on a one for one basis. Additional planned warfighting capabilities include: Navy Integrated Fire Control – Counter Air capability, Identification Friend or Foe Mode 5, Cooperative Engagement Capability, Close-In Weapons System Block 1B, Vertical Launch System upgrades with Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile, the AN/SPQ-9B Radar Set, the MK 34 Gun Weapon System with MK 160 Gun Computer System and Electro-Optic Sight System, and the SQQ-89A (V) 15 Integrated USW Combat System Suite.

4. Keeping the Fleet Whole.

Our crews and their ships must be ready, relevant and capable. We accomplish this by adequately maintaining the current fleet, building a future force prepared to meet emerging threats, and ensuring our crews are trained and ready to fight and win. I am fully supportive of the Surface and Expeditionary Warfare Training Committee and Ready Relevant Learning investments. We’re hard at work enhancing and developing new, sophisticated curricula and support tools that will provide better training for our Sailors as they operate more complex systems in an increasingly complicated world. In terms of fleet wholeness, we must strive to maximize the impact of maintenance availabilities. Our goal must be to get each ship out of its maintenance period on-time and on-budget—our Optimized Fleet Response Plan demands it!

5. Using Innovative Approaches to Address Future Surface Warfare Challenges.

Our warfighting capability and capacity is influenced by technological innovations, national priorities, and an evolving threat. The agile use of innovation will ensure we maintain our edge despite these changes. Some of this innovation comes in the form of expanding the mission capabilities of existing technology through hardware and software upgrades as well as new tactics development. N96 is also investing in new technology, including unmanned systems, enhanced integrated fire control systems, directed energy weapons and live virtual training technology.

So there you have it – my top five investment priorities as director, Surface Warfare. I am truly excited for the opportunity to build and shape the Navy’s surface combatant forces. I am committed to those who serve our fine Navy and will work closely with other organizations that share this responsibility with me. As I continue to learn and grow in my new role, I encourage my shipmates and friends of surface warfare to help me and my staff refine these priorities over time. That will require healthy dialogue, honest feedback and frequent engagement.

Again, I look forward to the future of surface warfare and to serving the warfighters who are making great things happen every day throughout the fleet! If you are in the Pentagon, I welcome you to swing by and see the N96 team. I am proud to lead this team of professionals here at the Pentagon as we support those in the fleet!

The Weekly Wire Rundown is a weekly video blog from the Office of the Chief of Naval Personnel, highlighting the top stories affecting Sailors and their families. The video compliments the print edition of the @USNPeople Weekly Wire, which you can subscribe to by e-mailing usnpeople@gmail.com. It can also be downloaded at www.navy.mil/cnp. We welcome any question and feedback on personnel matters or how to make this product better serve Sailors and their families.

Watch and let us know what you think in the comments below.

“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Steven right, passes the MCPON cutlass to Steven Giordano during his Change of Office & and Retirement Ceremony. Stevens served as the 13th MCPON for four years, and was relieved by FLTCM Steven Giordano. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Martin L. Carey/Released)

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Steven right, passes the MCPON cutlass to Steven Giordano during his Change of Office & Retirement Ceremony. Stevens served as the 13th MCPON for four years, and was relieved by FLTCM Steven Giordano. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Martin L. Carey/Released)

Sailors pose for a photo while working aloft on electronic equipment aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Krystofer Belknap)

Sailors pose for a photo while working aloft on electronic equipment aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Krystofer Belknap)

Capt. Michael Lewis, the 13th commanding officer of the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Houston (SSN 713) and the keynote speaker for the event, arrives at Houston’s decommissioning ceremony at Naval Base Kitsap Bangor. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Amanda R. Gray/Released)

Capt. Michael Lewis, the 13th commanding officer of the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Houston (SSN 713) and the keynote speaker for the event, arrives at Houston’s decommissioning ceremony at Naval Base Kitsap Bangor. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Amanda R. Gray/Released)

Lt. Jeremy Wano, Pacific Partnership 2016 dental planner and native of Pittsburgh, assigned to USNS Mercy (T-AH 19), poses for a selfie with a traditional Indonesian dancer at the Pacific Partnership 2016 Cultural Day luncheon. (University of California-San Diego Predental Society photo by Ted Wendel/Released)

Lt. Jeremy Wano, Pacific Partnership 2016 dental planner and native of Pittsburgh, assigned to USNS Mercy (T-AH 19), poses for a selfie with a traditional Indonesian dancer at the Pacific Partnership 2016 Cultural Day luncheon. (University of California-San Diego Predental Society photo by Ted Wendel/Released)

Intelligence Specialist 3rd Class Rien Desplinter, from Brighton, Colorado, prepares to play taps on a bugle as part of a burial-at-sea ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Comunication Specialist 3rd Class Alora R. Blosch)

Intelligence Specialist 3rd Class Rien Desplinter, from Brighton, Colorado, prepares to play taps on a bugle as part of a burial-at-sea ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Comunication Specialist 3rd Class Alora R. Blosch)

Sailors, assigned to Air department, simulate fighting a fire during an aircraft firefighting drill in the hangar bay aboard amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4). (U. S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael T. Eckelbecker/Released)

Sailors, assigned to Air department, simulate fighting a fire during an aircraft firefighting drill in the hangar bay aboard amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4). (U. S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael T. Eckelbecker/Released)

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician 1st Class Rex Wakamatsu plays tic-tac-toe at the Western Idaho Fair during Boise Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Kayla Good/Released)

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician 1st Class Rex Wakamatsu plays tic-tac-toe at the Western Idaho Fair during Boise Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Kayla Good/Released)

Religious Programs Specialist 3rd Class Joey Rush, from Detriot, escorts the cremains of Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class John P. Lamson to be committed to the sea during a burial-at-sea ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kris R. Lindstrom)

Religious Programs Specialist 3rd Class Joey Rush, from Detriot, escorts the cremains of Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class John P. Lamson to be committed to the sea during a burial-at-sea ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kris R. Lindstrom)

Chief Petty Officer Selectees conduct gun drills with a replica 24-pound long gun during Chief Petty Officer Heritage Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mickey Treigle/Released)

Chief Petty Officer Selectees conduct gun drills with a replica 24-pound long gun during Chief Petty Officer Heritage Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mickey Treigle/Released)

Navy Band Northwest Woodwind Trio preformed at Idaho Veterans Home as part of Boise Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Marie A. Montez/Released)

Navy Band Northwest Woodwind Trio preformed at Idaho Veterans Home as part of Boise Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Marie A. Montez/Released)

Chief (Selects) run in formation during a 5K run on the flight deck of amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jesse Monford/Released)

Chief (Selects) run in formation during a 5K run on the flight deck of amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jesse Monford/Released)

Chief Petty Officer Selectees learn how to row in a Cornish Gig, a small boat similar to USS Constitution's boats during Chief Petty Officer Heritage Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class William Collins III/Released)

Chief Petty Officer Selectees learn how to row in a Cornish Gig, a small boat similar to USS Constitution’s boats during Chief Petty Officer Heritage Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class William Collins III/Released)

Lt. Cmdr. Michael Blackman performs a dead lift event, lifting 495 lbs. during a steel beach picnic aboard amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4). (U. S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Brian Caracci/Released)

Lt. Cmdr. Michael Blackman performs a dead lift event, lifting 495 lbs. during a steel beach picnic aboard amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4). (U. S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Brian Caracci/Released)

Seaman Tyron Hodge, back, Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Joshua Schultz, middle, and Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Andrew Peixoto move a heat shield on the flight deck of the amphibious dock landing ship USS Whidbey Island (LSD 41). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nathan R. McDonald/Released)

Seaman Tyron Hodge, back, Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Joshua Schultz, middle, and Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Andrew Peixoto move a heat shield on the flight deck of the amphibious dock landing ship USS Whidbey Island (LSD 41). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nathan R. McDonald/Released)

Rear Adm. Bruce Gillingham, Commander, Navy Medicine West administers the oath of enlistment to 40 Delayed Entry Program members from Naval Recruiting District Portland during the Western Idaho Fair as part of Boise Navy Week. (US Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1stClass Marie A. Montez) Released

Rear Adm. Bruce Gillingham, Commander, Navy Medicine West administers the oath of enlistment to 40 Delayed Entry Program members from Naval Recruiting District Portland during the Western Idaho Fair as part of Boise Navy Week. (US Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1stClass Marie A. Montez) Released

Quartermaster Seaman Cleveland Cone from Auburn, Ala., takes wind speed and direction measurements aboard USS Ross (DDG 71). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Theron J. Godbold/Released)

Quartermaster Seaman Cleveland Cone from Auburn, Ala., takes wind speed and direction measurements aboard USS Ross (DDG 71). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Theron J. Godbold/Released)

Sailors proudly serve around the world in a variety of ways. Tell us which photo grabs your interest.

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of Recruit Training Command’s graduation, Pass-In Review. It is a formal military ceremony that honors a Sailor’s hard work and dedication to a new way of life. Pass-In-Review also ties together the future of the Navy with our long-held naval traditions and customs.

Read how Recruit Training Command transforms civilians into Sailors – 38,000 of them each year.

On Aug. 18, 2015, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced the establishment of a Recruit Honor Graduate Ribbon for superior performance during the Navy’s basic military training, held at Naval Station Great Lakes, Illinois.

The live video from the Navy’s only boot camp at Great Lakes, Illinois, is scheduled to begin 8:45 a.m. CDT Sept. 2.

Congratulations Sailors and welcome aboard to the newest members of our Navy family!

Join the #USNavy conversation on social media on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube, and Flickr.

Congratulate the Navy’s newest Sailors by leaving a comment below.