Rustic American Flag Gunny's Job Board

Category Archives: Great Green Fleet

Our Sailors’ Lives and Our Navy’s Capability Demand Enduring Energy Action

By Vice Adm. Phil Cullom
Deputy chief of naval operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics

Energy Action Month 2016 closes out today. As it ends, I ask our warriors around the Navy to treat today as the beginning of next year’s journey toward achieving a more secure energy future.

During operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom, our adversaries frequently targeted the Achilles’ heel of our logistics chain – the convoys that brought massive amounts of fuel and other supplies to resupply the front lines. During these conflicts, we learned some hard lessons. We’re learning from them as we tackle ways to reduce the amount of liquid fuel used by deployed forces. It’s about using less fuel to gain more enduring combat capability. Reducing the number of convoys required to accomplish the mission means less exposure to attacks and less operational threats to our personnel. These are at the core of WHY we have pursued energy efficiencies and that effort transcends every military operational landscape – on land, at sea and in the air.

FALLUJA, Iraq (April 6, 2004) - The Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Seventy Four (NMCB-74), Tactical Movement Team (TMT), escorts a construction crew convoy through Falluja, Iraq. (U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Eric Powell/Released)
FALLUJA, Iraq (April 6, 2004) – The Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Seventy Four (NMCB-74), Tactical Movement Team (TMT), escorts a construction crew convoy through Falluja, Iraq. (U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Eric Powell/Released)

 

PACIFIC OCEAN (July 26, 2016) Ensign Frances Gale, the conning officer, checks forward clearance as the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53) breaks away from the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7) while conducting a replenishment-at-sea during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryan J. Batchelder/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (July 26, 2016) Ensign Frances Gale, the conning officer, checks forward clearance as the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53) breaks away from the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7) while conducting a replenishment-at-sea during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryan J. Batchelder/Released)

For our sea services, refueling ships, aircraft or tactical vehicles is a key capability essential to persistent presence worldwide. We do it extraordinarily well but, as we know, the refueling process impacts our maneuverability, agility and logistics at sea. If platforms can travel farther on a gallon of fuel or remain longer on station in a mission-ready posture without refueling as frequently, we enhance our persistent combat capability and that ultimately saves lives. The DON’s commitment to energy has always been on the cutting edge.

You can take great pride in the accomplishments of our worldwide deployment of the 2016 Great Green Fleet that focused on getting more fight with less fuel. The number of units involved in these efforts in every theater is impressive; you’ve pushed the envelope in experimenting with technology, operational concepts, and alternative sources afloat and ashore that better sustain our operations in every way.

But we can’t stop there. We have an obligation to those who have gone before us to dedicate and challenge ourselves to ensuring our adversaries never exploit energy to achieve an advantage or use it against us. We should all remember a line from a poem written after World War I by Archibald MacLeish, “We leave you our deaths, give them their meaning.” The loss of life and sacrifices we suffered in our most recent conflicts can’t be in vain. The choices we make today and in the future can have life and death consequences for our Sailors who stand the watch every day. Our energy management actions impact operational risks for the Navy and our nation. We need to take these lessons to heart for the next fight, wherever that may occur, and in whatever environment.

ARABIAN GULF (Nov. 16, 2014) The Afloat Forward Staging Base (Interim) USS Ponce (ASB(I) 15) conducts an operational demonstration of the Office of Naval Research-sponsored Laser Weapon System while deployed to the Arabian Gulf. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams/Released)
ARABIAN GULF (Nov. 16, 2014) The Afloat Forward Staging Base (Interim) USS Ponce (ASB(I) 15) conducts an operational demonstration of the Office of Naval Research-sponsored Laser Weapon System while deployed to the Arabian Gulf. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams/Released)

This is not about saving fuel or saving money; if it does, that’s an extra benefit that we must reinvest. In the end, this is ALL about our combat capability and what it means to you, our warfighters. Our goal is to extend time on station and ensure we are where it matters, when it matters. History may not repeat itself, but it sure does rhyme. During World War II, Fleet Admiral Ernest King said “oil is ammunition” to emphasize the connection between energy, logistics and warfighting. It remains so today and with the advent of energy weapons envisioned in the coming decades it will literally be true. We won’t need rocket motors, powder casings or even explosive warheads. Electricity and energy itself will take the place of all three. In the meantime, all of us must positively disrupt the energy future for our entire naval enterprise. We must get more combat capability out of every gallon, Btu and kilowatt hour. Simply put, power yields more presence. Our access to and use of energy must continue to be secure, reliable and resilient. As we ‘net the Navy’ together for the future, we must ensure all parts of the net are secure to support our ships, submarines and aircraft. To get this right across the continuum of land and sea, we must realize the shore is an integral part of this equation since it serves as the backbone from which our forces fly, sail, submerge and communicate. We must therefore guard against vulnerabilities throughout our entire netted kill chain.

SAN DIEGO (Nov. 6, 2014) The mobile landing platform Lewis B. Puller (T-MLP-3/T-AFSB-1) successfully completed launch and float-off at the General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. (NASSCO) shipyard. Lewis B. Puller is the first afloat forward staging base (AFSB) variant of the MLP and is optimized to support a variety of maritime missions. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of NASSCO/Released)
SAN DIEGO (Nov. 6, 2014) The mobile landing platform Lewis B. Puller (T-MLP-3/T-AFSB-1) successfully completed launch and float-off at the General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. (NASSCO) shipyard. Lewis B. Puller is the first afloat forward staging base (AFSB) variant of the MLP and is optimized to support a variety of maritime missions. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of NASSCO/Released)

Each of us has a role to play, regardless of warfare specialty or whether we’re Sailors or Navy civilians because we’re all part of one Navy team. As we continue to incorporate new and innovative energy technologies and efficiency practices across our operational and shore platforms, now and into the future, the stakes are too high not to get it right. Looking across all Navy communities, we must recognize that Energy Action Month does not end October 31. Today, I challenge you to think about the future and do your part in this important endeavor to honor and to give meaning to the lives of those who made the ultimate sacrifice. Past and future Sailors deserve nothing less than our full commitment.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/10/31/our-sailors-lives-and-our-navys-capability-demand-enduring-energy-action/ U.S. Navy

Innovation Lessons from Great White Fleet and Great Green Fleet ‘Energize’ RIMPAC 2016

By Rear Adm. John Fuller
Commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific
Commander, Task Force Energy and Environment

More than 100 years ago this month – July 16, 1908 – President Teddy Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet sailed into Hawaii as part of its cruise that circumnavigated the globe.

Then, the armada of 16 battleships, painted white, steamed into the harbor trailing thick black smoke from the coal-fired engines that drove them. One of the goals of the Great White Fleet was to demonstrate the capability of new technologies and platforms to enable the U.S. Navy to establish itself as a worldwide presence.

Atlantic Fleet battleships steaming out of Hampton Roads, Virginia, at the start of their World cruise, 16 December 1907. The nearest ship is USS Maine (Battleship # 10). Next astern is USS Missouri (Battleship # 11). U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Atlantic Fleet battleships steaming out of Hampton Roads, Virginia, at the start of their World cruise, 16 December 1907. The nearest ship is USS Maine (Battleship # 10). Next astern is USS Missouri (Battleship # 11). U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

 

One of Roosevelt’s challenges with operating the Great White Fleet was whether there would be enough sources of fuel to support the trip. So, even then, the availability of fuel determined our ability to operate forward.

In those days, as it does today, Pearl Harbor played a critical role as a strategic logistics hub for the Pacific. The Navy originally established Pearl Harbor as a coaling station for ships transiting the world’s largest ocean.

Firemen. Members of the "Black Gang", stoke the coal burning power plants of the battleships of the Great White Fleet. Circa 1907-1908.

Firemen. Members of the “Black Gang”, stoke the coal burning power plants of the battleships of the Great White Fleet. Circa 1907-1908.

It was not an easy transition from wooden ships and sail to steel hulls and coal-fired steam engines but, in the purest sense, the Great White Fleet was absolutely bold, innovative, audacious and daring.

Naysayers warned against abandoning the “tried and true” wooden sailing ships for a new technology– steam power– that they saw as too dangerous and unproven. Yet, in a relatively short time, the U.S. Navy and all the great navies embraced the new concept.

One hundred years ago, the world was changing and it was changing more quickly than ever before in history. Sound familiar?

During Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2016, we are linked to last century’s Great White Fleet by the innovation chain demonstrated by the Great Green Fleet.

I’d be willing to bet that a hundred years ago, Sailors would scratch their heads (and their beards) if they heard words like photovoltaic, biofuel blend, LED lights, nuclear fission, net zero, and Great Green Fleet.

What would the great leaders of the past think about today’s culture of change, about embracing new fuels and efficiencies, and about the construct of using energy as a key element in operations – including directed energy weapons systems?

SOUTH CHINA SEA (March 4, 2016) – Seaman Recruit Joshua Mwamba, from Dallas, signals the fast combat support ship USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7) during a replenishment at sea to receive a blend of advanced biofuel and stores aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53). Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, Mobile Bay is operating as part of the John C. Stennis Strike Group and Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryan J. Batchelder/Released)

SOUTH CHINA SEA (March 4, 2016) – Seaman Recruit Joshua Mwamba, from Dallas, signals the fast combat support ship USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7) during a replenishment at sea to receive a blend of advanced biofuel and stores aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53). Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, Mobile Bay is operating as part of the John C. Stennis Strike Group and Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryan J. Batchelder/Released)

 

Today, as part of the Great Green Fleet, we are achieving what Vice Adm. Nora Tyson, commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet, calls a “new normal” in fleet operations, where energy is an operational and tactical resource. As a “fact of life,” we must continue developing the tools and tactics to use energy as part of that chain of events necessary to achieve mission success.

Just as we learned from history – that there is a greater good in productive, capable, and adaptive partnerships – we also can learn how to be better stewards of the environment and smarter users of energy:

  • We can conserve non-renewable resources.
  • We can develop renewable sources of energy.
  • We can achieve synergy and strength by working together.

Today, with the Great Green Fleet, we demonstrate our interdependence as team players with our friends and partners – moving away from a reliance on nonrenewable energy and moving toward protecting our shared global environment.

The Great Green Fleet’s Task Force Energy and Environment at RIMPAC 2016 demonstrates collaboration, cooperation, communication and innovation here in the beautiful Hawaiian Islands – where navies can train like nowhere else on Earth and achieve a mastery of the sea even Roosevelt could not predict.

Editor’s notes: For more information on RIMPAC 2016, visit the following links:

Be a part of the conversation on social media using #RIMPAC and #PacificPartners.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/07/09/innovation-lessons-from-great-white-fleet-and-great-green-fleet-energize-rimpac-2016/ U.S. Navy

Demonstrating Capable, Adaptive, Partners During 25th RIMPAC

By Vice Adm. Nora Tyson
Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet
Commander, Rim of the Pacific’s Combined Task Force

It’s hard to imagine that when RIMPAC began in 1971, only five nations participated – Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Since then, it’s grown to become the world’s largest international maritime exercise.

This year marks the 25th RIMPAC, and we have more nations participating than ever before. Twenty-six countries, more than 40 ships, five submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 people will be working together over the next month, demonstrating how “Capable, Adaptive, Partners” help preserve peace and prevent conflict.

It’s great to see so many RIMPAC alumni here. We are thrilled to welcome first-time participants, Denmark, Germany, and Italy, and we also have observers from Cambodia, Israel, Papua New Guinea, Turkey, and Vietnam.

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM (July 1, 2016) An aerial view of ships moored at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam for Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy Combat Camera photo montage by Mass Communication Specialist First Class Ace Rheaume/RELEASED)

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM (July 1, 2016) An aerial view of ships moored at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam for Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy Combat Camera photo montage by Mass Communication Specialist First Class Ace Rheaume/RELEASED)

 

Our economies, our lives, and our mutual interests are more intertwined now than ever. Freedom of movement in the maritime domain is essential to a healthy and prosperous region, and the economic prosperity in the Indo-Asia Pacific region can largely be attributed to the security and stability that exists at sea. During RIMPAC, participating forces train to ensure the ability to deter disruptions to global supply chains and threats to lines of communication and commerce.

The maritime environment is too large for any one nation to protect. Exercises like RIMPAC provide an environment to strengthen regional partnerships and improve multinational interoperability.

RIMPAC also allows us to work together to demonstrate the proficiency and flexibility of maritime forces. We live in the most connected and globalized time in the history of humankind. As we’ve seen in the past, during disasters like the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the 2011 tsunami that ravaged Japan, Typhoon Yolanda that pummeled the Philippines in 2013, or Hurricane Katrina which devastated the U.S. Gulf Coast in 2005, and I could go on and on, nations across the world band together to help our fellow man.

Through multinational exercises, like RIMPAC, we build relationships that allow us to work together more effectively. Humanitarian assistance/disaster relief is just one area we will be exercising during RIMPAC. We will also conduct maritime security operations, complex warfighting scenarios, amphibious operations, gunnery, missile, anti-submarine and air defense exercises, as well as counter-piracy, mine clearance operations, explosive ordnance disposal, and diving and salvage operations.

PEARL HARBOR (July 5, 2016) An information graphic about the biennial Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Navy graphic by MC1 Ace Rheaume/Released)

PEARL HARBOR (July 5, 2016) An information graphic about the biennial Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise. (U.S. Navy graphic by MC1 Ace Rheaume/Released)

 

The Department of the Navy’s Great Green Fleet yearlong initiative will also play a major role in RIMPAC. The initiative highlights global operations using energy conservation measures and alternative fuel blends to demonstrate how optimizing energy use increases resiliency and operational readiness. During RIMPAC, almost all participating units will operate using an approved alternate-fuel blend.

We have some exciting firsts this RIMPAC, including a submarine rescue exercise and flexing the command and control structure for several at-sea events. Maritime forces in the Southern California operating area will conduct amphibious operations, a U.S. Navy littoral combat ship will conduct a harpoon missile shoot, and the Trident Warrior experimentation series will highlight fleet innovation.

We are thrilled to be getting started, and when the 25th RIMPAC concludes next month, we will have collectively improved our ability to operate alongside our partners, build professional relationships that will last throughout our careers, and will remember the experience for a lifetime.

Editor’s notes: For more information on RIMPAC 2016, visit the following links:

Be a part of the conversation on social media using #RIMPAC and #PacificPartners.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/07/08/demonstrating-capable-adaptive-partners-during-25th-rimpac/ U.S. Navy