A Third Marine Aircraft Wing pilot, based out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California, was
A Third Marine Aircraft Wing pilot, based out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, was killed as a
The chief of staff, Army announces the following assignments:Brig. Gen. (Promotable) Terrence J. McKenrick, commanding general, Brigade Modernization Command, Army Capabilities Integration Center, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, Fort Bliss, Texas, to deputy commanding general, U.S. Army Central/Third U.S. Army, Kuwait. Brig. Gen. Timothy
From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs This week, we spoke with Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) Fleet Master Chief April Beldo about Career Waypoints (C-Way), and its design to further the careers of Sailors in today’s Navy. Fleet Master Chief Beldo discussed C-Way’s importance to the fleet, how it’s designed to assist Sailors, and her recommendations for Sailors who are applying for reenlistment within C-Way.
“C-Way is an initiative, and a program that we have online that our NCCs (Navy Career Counselors) use to help our Sailors go through their careers. Whether they are able to reenlist in their rating, or whether they have to convert to different ratings, it allows us to make sure that the health of our communities stays stabilized and provides opportunities for advancement.”

MPT&E Fleet Master Chief April Beldo on the importance of C-Way

MC1 Casper: Hello, I’m MC1 Julia Casper, and I’m here to speak with Fleet Master Chief April Beldo about Career Waypoints, better known as C-Way. Master chief, thank you for taking the time to speak with me today. Fleet Master Chief Beldo: Thanks MC1 for having me. Appreciate it. MC1 Casper: Could you please tell me why it’s important for Sailors to use C-Way? Fleet Master Chief Beldo: C-Way is an initiative, and a program that we have online that our NCCs (Navy Career Counselors) use to help our Sailors go through their careers. Whether they are able to reenlist in their rating, or whether they have to convert to different ratings, it allows us to make sure that the health of our communities stays stabilized and provides opportunities for advancement, so it is an important program that we have. MC1 Casper: How is C-Way designed to help Sailors? Fleet Master Chief Beldo: What C-Way does for the Sailor, and the Navy, is it allows us to continue watching the health of each rating, the health of the community, and then it provides the Sailor an opportunity to look at jobs that might possibly be available to them if they find themselves in a situation where they have to convert to another rate. So, it shows them all the jobs that are opened, the health of the community of that particular rate, and then the score that they have to have to see if they are qualified for that new rate. MC1 Casper: What is your recommendation for Sailors who are applying for reenlistment within C-Way? Fleet Master Chief Beldo: Well, the most important aspect of that is for them to sit down with their LPO, their chief and their career counselor, and put that application in at the 15-month mark. Then anytime any information needs to be updated within their career, for instance, they might have got their warfare pin; new evaluations might have came out; maybe they just completed their physical fitness test; all that information needs to be updated as you get it. We want to make sure our Sailors have the most up-to-date information in C-Way, so when they come up on their looks, we know they are stacking up well against their shipmates. MC1 Casper: Thank you. For more information about C-Way, check our story on Navy.mil. For the chief of naval personnel, I’m MC1 Julia Casper.
Career Waypoints career path graphic. (U.S. Navy photo illustration by MC1 Julia A. Casper/Released)

Career Waypoints career path graphic. (U.S. Navy photo illustration by MC1 Julia A. Casper/Released)

Today, in a ceremony at Marine Barracks in Washington, D.C, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced that Arleigh-Burke class destroyer, DDG 124, will be named Harvey C. Barnum Jr. in honor of the retired U.S. Marine Corps Colonel who received the Medal of Honor for valor during the Vietnam War. Colonel Barnum also served as Deputy Assistant

Sub Lieutenant Jeremie FraserBy Sub Lieutenant Jeremie Fraser
Canadian exchange officer onboard USS San Diego (LPD 22)

It usually takes three or four days before you see the beginning of fatigue in the eyes of everyone. However, it always ends by noticing the signs of tiredness related to additional duties and responsibilities once ships are underway at sea.

On American ships, as in the Royal Canadian Navy, a “watch” system is established in addition to the normal working day, so it is not uncommon for an officer to be on watch from 3 to 6 a.m. before starting a normal workday. What’s impressive is to see good humor prevail despite the general fatigue.

Operating a warship is a team effort and the crew of USS San Diego perform incredibly. Crew members are passionate about their work and aren’t hesitant to talk about it.

The ship’s population is diverse. There are tan-coloured marine uniforms alongside the blue uniforms of the Sailors. According to the books on military history I’ve read in the ship library, the Marines have always been an impressive fighting force. As they are specialized in amphibious operations, most of them do not have essential duties on board the ship. Some Sailors and Marines themselves go so far as to insinuate — half serious, half joking — that Marines may have a little too much free time on board. However, you cannot say they are undisciplined: the gyms in the ship are always full. They are also the raison d’être of the USS San Diego.

PACIFIC OCEAN (July 15, 2016) Two Landing Craft Air Cushions (LCACs) assigned to Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 5 pass each other while transporting U.S. Marines and their equipment from amphibious transport dock ship USS San Diego (LPD 22) during Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joseph M. Buliavac/Released)

PACIFIC OCEAN (July 15, 2016) Two Landing Craft Air Cushions (LCACs) assigned to Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 5 pass each other while transporting U.S. Marines and their equipment from amphibious transport dock ship USS San Diego (LPD 22) during Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joseph M. Buliavac/Released)

 

I recently had the opportunity to go for a ride in a hovercraft (Landing Craft, Air Cushion) – an impressive machine. I was told the effect of the surf on the LCAC tends to upset those who are prone to seasickness. The person sitting next to me was equipped with a big transparent plastic bag for that purpose. So, I kindly offered to hold the bag for her in case her stomach decided to clear itself. Ultimately, no one got sick. I have yet to hit a sea strong enough to take away my taste for sailing. My colleagues and I continue to adapt to life onboard USS San Diego. The opportunity to sail with a US ship has been an amazing opportunity that I will never forget.

Editor’s note: For more information on RIMPAC 2016, visit the following links:

Be a part of the conversation on social media using #RIMPAC and #PacificPartners.

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of the ship naming ceremony for DDG-124.

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus will announce the Arleigh-Burke class destroyer’s name today, July 28, at 10 a.m. EDT.

Live video from Marine Barracks in Washington, D.C, is scheduled to begin at 9:55 a.m..

Join the #USNavy conversation on social media on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube, and Flickr.
Pentagon Deputy Press Secretary Gordon Trowbridge provided the following readout: Deputy Defense Secretary Bob Work met with Republic of Korea Vice Minister of National Defense Hwang In-Moo on July 26 at the Pentagon. The two discussed the continuing cooperation between the United States and the ROK to address North Korea's nuclear weapon and

By Capt. Homer Denius
Commander, Amphibious Squadron 3

Amphibious warfare is a complex set of capabilities shared between the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps that projects an adaptable and versatile force from the sea. During every Rim of the Pacific exercise, these capabilities are practiced and then tested with our partners throughout the Pacific. RIMPAC 2016 has been no exception. This year, we have not only practiced and honed our skills with our partners, but also increased amphibious interoperability through a series of landing craft exchanges during real-world scenarios.

PACIFIC OCEAN (July 21, 2016) Fleet replenishment oiler USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204), Royal Australian Navy Canberra-class amphibious ship HMAS Canberra (L02) and amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) conduct and underway replenishment at Rim of the Pacific 2016 (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joseph M. Buliavac/Released)

PACIFIC OCEAN (July 21, 2016) Fleet replenishment oiler USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204), Royal Australian Navy Canberra-class amphibious ship HMAS Canberra (L02) and amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) conduct and underway replenishment at Rim of the Pacific 2016 (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joseph M. Buliavac/Released)

 

Typically, an amphibious squadron will be responsible for three ships that make up an amphibious ready group. These three ships –normally an amphibious assault ship, dock landing ship and amphibious transport dock – each bring unique capabilities that complement each other and also provide flexibility in case we need to separate the amphibious ready group ships for special mission requirements. During RIMPAC, we not only are conducting the movement, logistics and daily operations of the U.S. ships, USS America (LHA 6) and USS San Diego (LPD 22), but the third ship of the amphibious ready group includes the Royal Australian Navy’s HMAS Canberra (LHD 02). These three ships operate as a combined task group and are able to project forces ashore, combining complex aviation and surface ship-to-shore operations. Within these operations, surface craft from San Diego and aircraft from America have operated on board Canberra, while Canberra’s helicopters and boats have operated aboard San Diego and America.

PACIFIC OCEAN (July 19, 2016) A Royal Australian Navy LHD Landing Craft embarks in the well deck of amphibious transport dock ship USS San Diego (LPD 22) during Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joseph M. Buliavac/Released)

PACIFIC OCEAN (July 19, 2016) A Royal Australian Navy LHD Landing Craft embarks in the well deck of amphibious transport dock ship USS San Diego (LPD 22) during Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joseph M. Buliavac/Released)

The unique interoperability events between San Diego and Canberra have been a highlight of the exercise. Navy landing craft air cushions and Marine Corps amphibious assault vehicles have operated flawlessly from the Canberra’s well deck, while Australia’s assault boats entered and exited San Diego’s well deck like clockwork. All of these operations occurred while MV-22 Ospreys, CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters and MH-60 Sea Hawk helicopters conducted their first landings aboard Canberra. This proof of interoperability expands both the United States’ and Australia’s capabilities, which opens several new opportunities to deter simulated threats and adversaries during the “War At Sea” exercise.

RIMPAC 2016 brings 26 nations together to train in a fast-paced maritime environment and provides exceptional training for U.S. and partner forces. Whether it’s Marines going ashore or destroyers working alongside amphibious ships, RIMPAC collectively demonstrates the importance of adapting to an evolving environment, the increased capability amphibious forces bring to that environment, and how to best capitalize on the resources provided by the amphibious force. It has been an exceptional experience working with the many nations of RIMPAC. It is a unique opportunity to significantly expand our interoperability and thus our capability in amphibious warfare.

Editor’s note: For more information on RIMPAC 2016, visit the following links:

Be a part of the conversation on social media using #RIMPAC and #PacificPartners.

 The Department of Defense today held a video conference co-chaired by Acting Assistant Secretary for International Security Affairs Elissa Slotkin and Rear Adm. Michael J. Dumont, deputy director, J-5, Strategic Plans and Policy on the Joint Staff, with Russian Ministry of Defense counterparts. This was a regular session of our dialogue with the