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Rating Modernization: Navy Credentialing (COOL)

By Rear Adm. John Nowell
Director of Military Personnel, Plans and Policies

Rating modernization is the future of growing the workforce in the Navy. In August, we released NAVADMIN 196/18 that provided an update on those four lines of effort and this is the fifth of a total of five blog posts that talk about the updates to rating modernization. We also have a series of six rating modernization podcasts that mirror the blogs we will be sharing with you.

Want a quick overview of COOL? Watch the 60-second video.

Want to get the Navy COOL app? Look for it on the Google Play store or iTunes.

Educational tools and applications available to Sailors for download include final multiple score (FMS), credentialing opportunities online (Navy COOL), Center for Language, Regional Expertise and Culture, and Navy College Program. (U.S. Navy graphic by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brittany N. Tobin/Released)
Educational tools and applications available to Sailors for download include final multiple score (FMS), credentialing opportunities online (Navy COOL), Center for Language, Regional Expertise and Culture, and Navy College Program. (U.S. Navy graphic by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brittany N. Tobin/Released)

 

Navy Credentialing Opportunities Online is a credentialing-assistance program for Sailors and DOD civilians to obtain licenses and certifications to validate their knowledge and experience and open doors to new opportunities in the Navy and in the civilian community.

This is important because obtaining credentials — certifications and licenses — shows that you meet certain professional and technical standards of many civilian jobs. The Navy has made credentials part of its workforce professionalization, so getting certified can help you in your Navy career while you’re still in service.

Navy Credentialing Opportunities Online currently funds over 2,700 certificates/licenses with opportunities for Sailors in every rating. Navy COOL recently reduced the minimum service remaining on a Sailor’s enlistment contract to earn credentials from 12 to six months, and expanded opportunity for Sailors to earn credentials mapped to an academic degree, on/off-duty training, Navy Reservist’s civilian occupation or many technical education certificates. Additionally, there are more opportunities for Sailors to maximize their Navy training and qualifications toward attainment of U.S. Coast Guard licenses, to include funding the Transportation Worker Identification Card.

These opportunities are highlighted in a dedicated “USCG National Maritime Center (NMC) Credentialing” tab for ratings with applicable USCG license alignment on the Navy COOL website.

SOUDA BAY, Greece (Feb. 15, 2018) David Adkins, an instructor for the Navy Credentialing Opportunities On-Line (COOL) program, talks to from Naval Support Activity (NSA) Souda Bay about the Navy Cool website on board NSA Souda Bay. (U.S. Navy photo by Joel Diller/Released)
SOUDA BAY, Greece (Feb. 15, 2018) David Adkins, an instructor for the Navy Credentialing Opportunities On-Line (COOL) program, talks to from Naval Support Activity (NSA) Souda Bay about the Navy Cool website on board NSA Souda Bay. (U.S. Navy photo by Joel Diller/Released)

 

Sailors will be able to convert their military training records, billet assignment history and other credentialing data to a compatible civilian resume by the end of Fiscal Year 2019. Using those standardized data, Sailors can easily research information on civilian and federal occupations mapped to their ratings.

So, how do you get a credential? To get COOL, take these easy steps:

  • Find and select related credentials. Select credentials and determine your eligibility by using the “find” feature and “checking your eligibility” feature.
  • Complete voucher and apply. Complete the voucher request for the exam or maintenance fee.
  • Get credential. Navy COOL is not a credentialing organization. Contact the credentialing organization or test vendor to schedule and take the exam.
  • Report results to Navy COOL. Once you’ve taken the appropriate exam or have met requirements for re-certification, you are ready to report your results to COOL and other agencies.

For questions, contact Navy COOL via the website’s online feedback form or live chat features or speak with a Navy COOL advisor at 850-452-6683/6664 or email navycool@navy.mil.

Don’t forget to check out our podcasts! We have a series of six Rating Modernization podcasts that accompany this blog series.

Editor’s note: Sailor 2025 is the Navy’s program to more effectively recruit, develop, manage, reward and retain the force of tomorrow. It consists of approximately 45 living, breathing initiatives and is built on a framework of three pillars — a modern personnel system, a career learning continuum and career readiness.

https://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/03/20/rating-modernization-navy-credentialing-cool/ U.S. Navy

Rating Modernization: Advancement Process

By Rear Adm. John Nowell

Rating Modernization is the future of the growing workforce in the Navy. In August we released NAVADMIN 196/18 which provided an update on those four lines of effort and this is the fourth of a total of five blog posts that will talk about the updates to Rating Modernization. We also have a series of six Rating Modernization podcasts that mirror the blogs we will be sharing with you.

Last year we gave commands the ability to reinstate an E3 Sailor to E4 who had been awarded NJP, after a six month waiting period. We also eliminated E4 advancement exams for 20 ratings where Sailors auto-advance, which helps to reduce administrative burden.

BELL GARDENS, Calif. (Feb. 10, 2019) Reserve component Sailors assigned to Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Los Angeles take advancement exams in the drill hall at NOSC Los Angeles.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Pyoung K. Yi/Released)

Then, late in 2017, Navy senior enlisted leaders completed the first phase of the Advancement Exam Readiness Review (AERR) testing bank improvement plan by drafting advancement exam questions that match current and relevant rating-specific technical requirements with the hands-on, real-world knowledge and experience needed in the fleet.

The establishment of the Professional Military Knowledge Eligibility Exam (PMK-EE) focuses the Navy Wide Advancement Exam (NWAE) on occupational knowledge and will serve as an eligibility requirement for advancement to pay grades E4/5/6/7.  PMK-EE will be delivered electronically, and will be available via the MyNavyPortal (MNP) website beginning in October 2018.

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PEARL HARBOR (Jan. 16, 2019) Sailors review promotional materials for the MyNavy Career Development Symposium at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Matthew Riggs/Released)

The online Enlisted Advancement Worksheet (EAW), will automate the manual advancement processes and enable Sailors to review their worksheets before the exam and take charge of their advancement records. An EAW pilot, available through the Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System (NSIPS), will be implemented with the Active Duty and Reserve spring 2019 advancement cycles.

The Senior Enlisted Advancement to Vacancy (A2V) pilot was announced in June and will fill senior chief petty officer and master chief petty officer priority billets using a spot advancement incentive, and will lead enlisted advancement modernization for exceptional Sailors in all pay grades with critical NECs in the future.

Don’t forget to check out our podcasts! We have a series of six Rating Modernization podcasts that accompany this blog series.

Editor’s note: Sailor 2025 is the Navy’s program to more effectively recruit, develop, manage, reward and retain the force of tomorrow. It consists of approximately 45 living, breathing initiatives and is built on a framework of three pillars – a modern personnel system, a career learning continuum and career readiness.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/03/04/rating-modernization-advancement-process/ U.S. Navy

Rating Modernization: Marketplace Force Management

By Rear Adm. John Nowell
Director of Military Personnel, Plans and Policies

Rating Modernization is the future of the growing workforce in the Navy. In August, we released NAVADMIN 196/18 that provided an update on those four lines of effort and this is the third of a total of five blog posts that will talk about the updates to Rating Modernization. We also have a series of six Rating Modernization podcasts that mirror the blogs we will be sharing with you.

Driven by the urgent requirement to update and modernize personnel systems, we explored procedures to expand career fields in order to transform enlisted force community and career management in the future.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 15, 2019) Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Itzel Samaniego, from Nogales, Arizona, paints a cowling for an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 14 in the hangar bay aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jarrod A. Schad/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 15, 2019) Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Itzel Samaniego, from Nogales, Arizona, paints a cowling for an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 14 in the hangar bay aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jarrod A. Schad/Released)

 

The new marketplace will better balance needs of the Navy with the desires of the Sailor. Several pilot efforts focused on comparing rating skill sets, training requirements and billet availability were conducted in 2017. These pilots compared yeoman/personnel specialist and damage controlman/hull maintenance technician to determine viability and the appropriate inputs and possible components for building a future marketplace where some rating billets may be interchangeable.

A new “Navy Detailing Marketplace” is currently under development, through which the foundational elements of an automated personnel management system will tie Sailor enlistment directly to negotiations for a billet, which will then allow Sailors to reenlist or extend for that billet assignment. The marketplace will be a single system that uses the new NEC construct to better represent your qualifications, experience, and performance in the form of a resume.

MUARA, Brunei (Feb. 15, 2019) Culinary Specialist 1st Class Angelo Davo, left, and Quartermaster Seaman Joshua Davis, both from San Diego, stand watch as a bearing takers aboard the Avenger-class mine countermeasures ship USS Chief (MCM 14) as the ship transits to Muara Naval Base. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jordan Crouch/Released)

The “Sailor Resume” function will be available in the future under “My Record” on MyNavy Portal (MNP). Starting in Fiscal Year 2019, you will be able to view the advertised billets for which you are qualified. A resume will be generated that includes: ASVAB scores, security clearance status, worldwide deployability, qualifications, evaluations, NECs earned, education degrees and training certifications. Ultimately, the resume function will provide the ability to better match Sailors to billets.

One idea being explored in the marketplace is the ability to compare billets side-by-side, which will provide timely information to Sailors while they are considering their options for billets.

Representatives from Navy Personnel Command, U.S. Fleet Forces Command and the Bureau of Naval Personnel are working collaboratively to conduct a Marketplace Detailing “war game” for the rating of aerographers mate. This war game will engage more than 70 Sailors in a real world setting. The simulated exercise will use actual billets and Sailors to study the marketplace concepts and make improvements as necessary. The intended outcome is a detailing process which is easier to understand, transparent and gives Sailors more control in the assignment decision process by displaying more billet options and providing incentives for selecting high-priority billets, which meet the operational priority of the fleet.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Feb. 4, 2019) Electrician’s Mate 1st class William Gaillard, from Easley, South Carolina, prepares for a loss of pitch control exercise in main engine room two aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Bainbridge (DDG 96) during a composite training unit exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jason Waite/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Feb. 4, 2019) Electrician’s Mate 1st class William Gaillard, from Easley, South Carolina, prepares for a loss of pitch control exercise in main engine room two aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Bainbridge (DDG 96) during a composite training unit exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jason Waite/Released)

Examples of incentives under consideration include multiple tour details, incentive pay, advance-to-vacancy billets and educational opportunities. One example of multiple tours bundled into a single detailing transaction could be a guaranteed sea duty assignment in the same geographic area following a shore duty assignment, specifically in fleet concentration areas such as Lemoore and other similar type locations. Integrating these detailing incentives through the marketplace platform will provide opportunities for geo-stability to Sailors and their family while meeting the priorities of the fleet.

Additionally, the functional marketplace will be used by Sailors to transition between the active and reserve components and to apply for rating conversions. Sailors with training and special skills will have a more agile conversion process that leverages the Sailor resume and Marketplace Detailing data to inform them of where their skills best fit in the Navy. The same tools will enable detailers to better harness those unique skill sets possessed by certain Sailors to fill critical jobs.

Don’t forget to check out our podcasts! We have a series of six Rating Modernization podcasts that accompany this blog series.

Editor’s note: Sailor 2025 is the Navy’s program to more effectively recruit, develop, manage, reward and retain the force of tomorrow. It consists of approximately 45 living, breathing initiatives and is built on a framework of three pillars – a modern personnel system, a career learning continuum and career readiness.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/02/20/rating-modernization-marketplace-force-management/ U.S. Navy

Rating Modernization: Career Fields

By Rear Adm. John Nowell
Director of Military Personnel, Plans and Policies

Rating Modernization is the future of the growing workforce in the Navy. In August, we released NAVADMIN 196/18 that provided an update on those four lines of effort and this is the second of a total of five blog posts that will talk about the updates to Rating Modernization. We also have a series of six Rating Modernization podcasts that mirror the blogs we will be sharing with you.

The alignment of Navy ratings into 23 career fields and 12 broad communities has provided a foundation for future development of more flexible and sustainable career paths for Sailors.

INDIAN OCEAN (Feb. 3, 2019) Aviation Electronics Mate 3rd Class Hao Wu cleans mechanics on an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 14 on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Skyler Okerman/Released)
INDIAN OCEAN (Feb. 3, 2019) Aviation Electronics Mate 3rd Class Hao Wu cleans mechanics on an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 14 on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Skyler Okerman/Released)

 

As we transfer to Block Learning, the Navy has revised the Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) construct that organizes NECs according to their career fields. In October 2017 as well as March and June of 2018, three groups of over 850 NECs were successfully converted to a new construct.

Moving forward, the Rating Modernization working group will complete the commonality matrix, which links similar ratings and job codes. This matrix is a tool that will provide the ability to analyze similarities across ratings, skill sets, training curricula, credentials and other relevant factors. This capability will help both Sailors and Navy leadership identify opportunities for improving the transparency, flexibility and sustainability of enlisted career paths.

Within the career fields line of effort, we are providing Sailors with more choices, flexibility and transparency with career decisions. We broadened career fields by linking together ratings with similar skills to eventually allow Sailors to move laterally in a way they have never been able to before. This is a win-win situation. The Sailor has greater choices and transparency in negotiating for orders, ability to influence training and increase their promotion opportunities. And, all of this affords the Navy greater flexibility in assigning those highly-trained and talented personnel to critical billets. Not only will these changes improve our personnel and billet management processes to assign the right individual to the right job, but it will ultimately provide us the ability to train and repurpose elements of our force to meet a rapidly changing world.

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Jan. 18, 2019) Intelligence Specialist 1st Class Daniel Zinnikas works at a console aboard the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Arlington (LPD 24). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brandon Parker/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Jan. 18, 2019) Intelligence Specialist 1st Class Daniel Zinnikas works at a console aboard the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Arlington (LPD 24). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brandon Parker/Released)

A new way we are delivering training to Sailors in order to improve learning, reduce knowledge atrophy and provide training at the point and location of need is called Ready Relevant Learning. Under this new construct, Sailors will be given training in “blocks” rather than all at once upon entering the Navy. So, a Sailor who decides to move between career fields may have the need for additional training required to succeed in that field. The “gap” in knowledge in the new rating will be mitigated by blocks of learning.

The revised NEC construct is made up of four alpha-numeric characters which are organized into the 12 communities and 23 career fields. This new construct provides a foundation for wider career development opportunities in combination with other Rating Modernization and Sailor 2025 initiatives. The first digit of the new NEC code will be based on a Sailor’s community and identify the individual’s respective career field. The second and third digits will be unique alpha-numeric identifiers developed by the Navy Manpower Analysis Center. The fourth digit will represent how many blocks of training remain for a Sailor, or if the NEC code is not yet part of blocked training. Sailors will also see the further modernization of NEC structures to reflect levels of proficiency and experience associated with a particular skill.

A new assessment tool under development is the Commonality Matrix. The Commonality Matrix will help Sailors, career counselors, and decision makers have a better understanding for the expected knowledge, overlapping skill sets, and shared training requirements among various ratings, billets and jobs. The Commonality Matrix is an enormously important tool to the Rating Modernization lines of effort and is aimed at improving career flexibility, assignment transparency, and greater opportunities for training and credentialing. At its core, the Navy is taking a data-driven approach to make clearer the extent of the commonality of work that Sailors are performing today. When we have a clearer understanding of the work requirements, we can design better career paths.

NORFOLK (Jan. 24, 2019) Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Austin Otto, right, and Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Brady Williams participate in a simulated active shooter drill as part of antiterrorism training aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Joseph A.D. Phillips/Released)
NORFOLK (Jan. 24, 2019) Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Austin Otto, right, and Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Brady Williams participate in a simulated active shooter drill as part of antiterrorism training aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Joseph A.D. Phillips/Released)

Don’t forget to check out our podcasts! We have a series of six Rating Modernization podcasts that accompany this blog series.

Editor’s note: Sailor 2025 is the Navy’s program to more effectively recruit, develop, manage, reward and retain the force of tomorrow. It consists of approximately 45 living, breathing initiatives and is built on a framework of three pillars – a modern personnel system, a career learning continuum and career readiness.

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/02/06/rating-modernization-career-fields/ U.S. Navy

Rating Modernization: What’s new with it? A lot!

By Rear Adm. John Nowell
Director, Military Personnel, Plans and Policies

Have you heard about rating modernization? Do you know what it is and why we are doing it?

Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Robert Burke presented Rating Modernization to Congress in 2018. The first pillar [of Sailor 2025] is a wholesale modernization of our entire personnel system. We are creating flexible policies and additional career choices, and empowering commanding officers with tools to retain the best and brightest Sailors. We have already implemented programs, including the Meritorious Advancement Program, increased credentialing and graduate education opportunities, and tours with industry. We are also working to expand “Detailing Marketplace” pilot initiatives, overhaul the performance evaluation system, modernize delivery and tailoring of advancement examinations in conjunction with a rating modernization effort, and working to achieve greater permeability between the active and Reserve components.

OKINAWA, Japan (Jan. 17, 2019) Utilitiesman 1st Class Joshua Poirier, assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 3, and Sailors assigned to Commander, Fleet Activities Okinawa tenant commands, take the Navy-wide chief petty officer advancement exam onboard Camp Shields in Okinawa, Japan. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Lopez/Released)

 

Ultimately, rating modernization is all about bringing our personnel systems and the processes that we use into the 21st century. We are modernizing our rating system to redefine enlisted career fields, improve talent management and our detailing processes, offer Sailors more career choices and expand their professional development opportunity. We started this effort back in December 2016 to modernize our ratings in a way that had never been done before, and it was long overdue.

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (July 24, 2018) Damage Controlman 2nd Class Ruben Venegas, assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), demonstrates features of the Carrier-Advanced Reconfigurable Training Systems (C-ARTS) simulator at the Cape Henry Associates corporate office. C-ARTS is a mobile learning environment that uses virtual reality as a training mechanism to simulate real-life scenarios, providing support for the realization of the Navy’s Ready, Relevant Learning as part of the Sailor 2025 initiative. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alan Lewis/Released)
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (July 24, 2018) Damage Controlman 2nd Class Ruben Venegas, assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), demonstrates features of the Carrier-Advanced Reconfigurable Training Systems (C-ARTS) simulator at the Cape Henry Associates corporate office. C-ARTS is a mobile learning environment that uses virtual reality as a training mechanism to simulate real-life scenarios, providing support for the realization of the Navy’s Ready, Relevant Learning as part of the Sailor 2025 initiative. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alan Lewis/Released)

By joining rating modernization with the transformation of our enlisted personnel business processes, we’re going to provide our Sailors better talent management in career flexibility and the more relevant training they’re going to need for their next job. And it’s also going to add to their resume the widely recognized credentials that translate both within the Navy as well as to the civilian work force.

In the military, we tend to develop campaign plans that have lines of effort, so we developed a campaign plan for rating modernization with four key lines of effort: enlisted career fields, marketplace detailing, the advancement process and credentialing. When you combine these lines of effort, they support a long list of Sailor 2025 initiatives that will redefine Navy’s career fields and improve our talent management and the detailing process. As I mentioned, it will offer more career choices and more flexibility to our Sailors. But make no mistake, we’re doing this because the Navy has to do it because it’s going to help increase our fleet readiness, it’s going to make us more sustainable in the future where resources will continue to be scarce, and it’s going to help us with our fit.

Rating modernization is the future of the growing workforce in the Navy. In August, we released NAVADMIN 196/18 that provided an update on those four lines of effort. This is the first of a total of five blogs that will talk about the updates to rating modernization. The remaining four blogs will each zero in on one of the lines of effort to give you a little more clarity on what all these updates mean for you. We also have a series of six rating modernization podcasts that mirror the blogs we will be sharing with you.

Editor’s note: Sailor 2025 is the Navy’s program to more effectively recruit, develop, manage, reward and retain the force of tomorrow. It consists of approximately 45 living, breathing initiatives and is built on a framework of three pillars – a modern personnel system, a career learning continuum and career readiness.

SAN DIEGO (June 1, 2018) Sailors, selected for advancement to petty officer 2nd class, stand in formation during a frocking ceremony aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William Sykes)

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2019/01/23/rating-modernization-whats-new-with-it-a-lot/ Jason Kelly