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Dorie Miller’s Legacy: Inspiration for all U.S. Navy Sailors and all Americans

By Rear Adm. John Fuller
Commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific

The story of Dorie Miller is inspiring for all Sailors and all Americans.

In honor of African American History Month, let’s consider what his legacy means for all of us.

Mess Attendant Third Class Doris “Dorie” Miller
Mess Attendant Third Class Doris “Dorie” Miller

Mess Attendant Third Class Doris “Dorie” Miller was ready, willing and able Dec. 7, 1941. He literally took matters into his own hands to protect his ship and his shipmates when he – on his own volition – took control of a machine gun aboard USS West Virginia (BB 48) and returned fire during the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Prior to and even during World War II, mess attendants were relegated to laundry detail, cooking meals, swabbing the deck and shining officers’ shoes.

And, while the support functions the mess attendants provided then – and by extension the things our culinary specialists do today – have mission impacts, “messmen” were not allowed to be direct warfighters. In a fight, they carried ammunition and they carried the wounded to medical care.

They also carried the weight of discrimination and segregation – separate and unequal.

Adm. Chester Nimitz presents Dorie Miller with the Navy Cross on May 27, 1942, aboard USS Enterprise (CV 6) for Miller’s valor on Dec. 7, 1941. (Photo courtesy of the National Archives)
Adm. Chester Nimitz presents Dorie Miller with the Navy Cross on May 27, 1942, aboard USS Enterprise (CV 6) for Miller’s valor on Dec. 7, 1941. (Photo courtesy of the National Archives)

Adm. Chester Nimitz personally presented Miller with the Navy Cross May 27, 1942 aboard USS Enterprise (CV 6) for his valor Dec. 7, 1941.

Then, like most Pearl Harbor survivors, Miller took the fight from Hawaii and across the Pacific.

Miller was aboard USS Liscome Bay (CVE 56) in November 1943 during the Battle of Makin Island when an Imperial Japanese Navy submarine sank his ship. Miller was among the 646 Sailors killed when Liscome Bay went down.

In addition to the Navy Cross and other medals and awards, the Navy honored Doris “Dorie” Miller in 1973 by commissioning a Knox-class frigate, named USS Miller (FF 1091) after him.

On Oct. 11, 1991, the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority dedicated a bronze commemoration plaque in a military housing community near Pearl Harbor that is also his namesake – Doris Miller Housing.

Miller became a poster-hero in the earliest days of the civil rights movement.

He became a symbol of the notion that we should expect the exceptional if talented individuals have an equal opportunity or level playing field.

Miller fought for the ideals that our founders so eloquently described in the Declaration of Independence and in our Constitution, ideals that are meant for every American.

The United States military – and our society – have made great strides since President Truman desegregated the military; since Brown v. Board of Education; and since Presidents Kennedy and Johnson (both former U.S. Navy officers and World War II veterans) fought for and achieved the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

As Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said, “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice.”

Today, as we contemplate Miller’s bravery over 75 years ago and his sacrifice for our freedom, let’s consider the gift he and other World War II Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen and Marines gave us.

We have peace and freedom for ourselves, and our families because of their sacrifice and we must protect that gift.

Think about it: Dorie Miller and other young service members killed in World War II never had a chance to have their own family. We, however, have the privilege to honor their memory.

Since 1945 millions of American families have lived, loved and thrived thanks to the sacrifices warfighters like Miller made during World War II. Here in Hawaii, hundreds of families since 1991 have called the Doris Miller Housing community “home.”

Like Miller and his shipmates, we who wear the cloth of our nation are ready, willing and able to run toward danger to defend our homeland and our values.

Related Content

Honoring the Past, Inspiring the Future

As part of the 75th commemoration of the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor and other U.S. military facilities on Oahu, Petty Officer 2nd Class Freddie White shared how Mess Attendant 2nd Class Doris Miller’s toughness, accountability, integrity and initiative have influenced him.

Profiles in Leadership

To achieve optimal mission readiness, we provide every U.S. Navy Sailor and civilian with equal access to the tools and resources they need to succeed. Rear Adm. Fuller shares why his entire goal is to let his work and the content of his character speak for itself.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2017/02/21/dorie-millers-legacy-inspiration-for-all-u-s-navy-sailors-and-all-americans/ U.S. Navy

#PearlHarbor75: National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day Commemoration

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of the National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day Commemoration – cohosted by the National Park Service and the U.S. Navy.

The 75th commemoration of the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor and other U.S. military facilities on Oahu is an opportunity for us to honor the courage, service and sacrifice of the U.S. military personnel present during the attacks.

Live video from Kilo Pier, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, is scheduled to begin 12:30 p.m. ET/ 7:30 a.m. HT Dec. 7.

Leave a message below to honor our Sailors’ toughness, accountability, integrity and initiative that they demonstrated on a “date which will live in infamy.”

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/12/07/pearlharbor75-national-pearl-harbor-remembrance-day-commemoration/ Jason Kelly

Pearl Harbor Survivors Changed the World

Dec. 7, 2016, is the 75th anniversary of Imperial Japan’s attack on Oahu that launched the United States into World War II. Rear Adm. John Fuller speaks to nearly two hundred veterans of that war, including several dozen Pearl Harbor survivors, at the Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day ceremony at Kilo Pier on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, overlooking the USS Arizona Memorial. Here is his message to survivors and other veterans:

PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 7, 2015) Rear Adm. John Fuller, commander Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific, speaks with Pearl Harbor survivor Ed Schuler during a wreath dedication ceremony in remembrance of the 74th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attacks aboard the USS Arizona Memorial, Dec. 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeff Troutman/Released)
PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 7, 2015) Rear Adm. John Fuller, commander Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific, speaks with Pearl Harbor survivor Ed Schuler during a wreath dedication ceremony in remembrance of the 74th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attacks aboard the USS Arizona Memorial, Dec. 7. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeff Troutman/Released)

By Rear Adm. John Fuller
Commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific

To our most-honored guests – Pearl Harbor survivors and other World War II veterans – thank you for honoring us with your participation in today’s remembrance ceremony.

We are holding today’s events for you. Our objective and theme is: “Honoring the past, Inspiring the future.”

We remember your lost shipmates.

We salute your service and your families’ service.

We offer our most heartfelt thanks – for all you sacrificed and suffered.

Most of you veterans were teenagers or in your early twenties – and away from home for the first time.

Back home, your families longed to hear the news about the attack. Mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, grandparents, loved ones – all desperate to know the fate of their boys.

USS Arizona (BB 39) ablaze, immediately following the explosion of her forward magazines, Dec. 7, 1941. Frame clipped from a color motion picture taken from on board USS Solace (AH 5). (Official U.S. Navy photograph/Released)
USS Arizona (BB 39) ablaze, immediately following the explosion of her forward magazines, Dec. 7, 1941. Frame clipped from a color motion picture taken from on board USS Solace (AH 5). (Official U.S. Navy photograph/Released)

Meanwhile, you – the Pearl Harbor survivors – faced the grueling recovery and restoration.

Joined by Navy divers, civilian shipyard workers and citizens of Hawaii you responded, you rebuilt and you resurrected Pearl Harbor and the Pacific Fleet.

You felt the shock, the grief and then the need to bring the world back in balance.

In the days after the attack facts and information crawled along but rumors raced at light-speed.

It would take weeks to get detailed news to your families. And in some cases it took months.

People stood in endless lines at Western Union in Honolulu. On the mainland, families waited at home and wondered.

Some mothers and fathers received the worst-possible news – the news they dreaded.

Family,
Ohana,
Kazoku…

Family is our most precious institution and most precious possession.

Yet in war, innocent families are always victims.

Historian Ken Burns chronicled the Second World War – both in Europe and here in the Pacific. He called that war “the greatest cataclysm in history.”

It “grew out of ancient and ordinary human emotions – anger and arrogance and bigotry, victimhood and the lust for power. And it ended because other human qualities – courage and perseverance and selflessness, faith, leadership and the hunger for freedom – combined … to change the course of human events.”

HONOLULU (Dec. 3, 2016) Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Charping, of Charlotte, N.C., assigned to Navy Information Operation Command (NIOC), gets a hug from a World War II veteran arriving at Honolulu International Airport. More than 100 World War II veterans, including Pearl Harbor survivors, arrived in Honolulu to participate in the remembrance events throughout the week to honor the courage and sacrifices of those who served during Dec. 7, 1941, and throughout the Pacific Theater. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Nardel Gervacio/Released)
HONOLULU (Dec. 3, 2016) Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Charping, of Charlotte, N.C., assigned to Navy Information Operation Command (NIOC), gets a hug from a World War II veteran arriving at Honolulu International Airport. More than 100 World War II veterans, including Pearl Harbor survivors, arrived in Honolulu to participate in the remembrance events throughout the week to honor the courage and sacrifices of those who served during Dec. 7, 1941, and throughout the Pacific Theater. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Nardel Gervacio/Released)

Those who served in World War II, you earned the freedom and prosperity we enjoy today. You delivered that legacy with your toughness and grit and because of your honor, courage and commitment.

Those of you who served in World War II ushered in the current era of peace and prosperity that we have enjoyed for decades – with your blood, sweat and tears.

You re-created a world dedicated to order, justice and stability.

You preserved freedom.

You built reconciliation.

You created greater equality and civil rights.

And you earned our commitment to forever “Remember Pearl Harbor.”

Your lives changed on the morning of December 7, 1941.

After that day you would change the world forever.

As a humble beneficiary, I simply want to offer a sincere and heartfelt – thank you.

Graphic of a World War II veteran and a U.S. Navy Sailor saluting

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/12/07/pearl-harbor-survivors-changed-the-world/ U.S. Navy

December 7th, 1941: A Submarine Force Perspective

By Rear Adm. Fritz Roegge
Commander, Submarine Force U.S. Pacific Fleet

“When I assumed command of the Pacific Fleet on 31 December 1941, our submarines were already operating against the enemy, the only units of the fleet that could come to grips with the Japanese for months to come. It was to the submarine force that I looked to carry the load. It is to the everlasting honor and glory of our submarine personnel that they never failed us in our days of great peril.”
Admiral Chester Nimitz
Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (and also a submarine officer)

PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 6, 2016) Rear Adm. Fredrick "Fritz" Roegge, commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, greets a Pearl Harbor survivor during the unveiling of a new submarine exhibit at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael H. Lee/Released)
PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 6, 2016) Rear Adm. Fredrick “Fritz” Roegge, commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, greets a Pearl Harbor survivor during the unveiling of a new submarine exhibit at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael H. Lee/Released)

This week, America remembers the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. This remembrance is particularly meaningful to the U.S. Navy, and even more to Sailors serving at Pearl Harbor. But it should have the greatest significance to the Submarine Force, because it was our contributions to the Second World War that suggest that December 7th, 1941, was actually the day that Imperial Japan won a battle, but lost the war.

Submariners are well-aware that World War II provided some of our greatest challenges, our greatest successes, our greatest heroes, and also our greatest sacrifices. And here in Pearl Harbor, we can stand atop the Dive Tower on the Submarine Base and actually see the most visceral reminders of the complete cycle of the war: its opening salvo, the seeds of our eventual victory, and even the war’s conclusion. That makes Pearl Harbor unique – where else in the world is there such a singular vantage point for the breadth of such a major conflict?

The Opening Salvo.

Visual reminders of the start of the war are obvious, and infamous. In the harbor lies the USS Arizona Memorial, which honors the nearly 1.200 Sailors and Marines who lost their lives onboard that fateful day. Seaward of Arizona sat the battleships that comprised Battleship Row, remembered now by a line of white caissons. These caissons remind us not only of the Sailors of those battleships, but of the sheer number of casualties: the nearly 2,400 men, women and children, both service members and civilians, who lost their lives on that “day that shall live in infamy.”

The War’s Conclusion.

Sweeping to the left of the Arizona from the Dive Tower, those caissons now bracket the most powerful symbol of the war’s conclusion: the battleship USS Missouri. Today, we can visit the very place on board that ship where in September 1945 the peace treaty was signed that ended the war. That signing ceremony marked both a beginning and an end. As an end, it meant that the war had been won. But it also marked the beginning of the equally important challenge of how to win the peace. And as a result of having won the peace, the United States of America and our former adversary of Japan are now close friends, partners and allies – committed to each other’s success, to each other’s defense, and to promoting freedom and democracy throughout the Pacific.

The Seeds of Victory.

So the USS Arizona reminds us of the start of the war, and USS Missouri reminds us of the end of the war, but the reminders of how the war was won are also visible from the Dive Tower. Although the results of December 7th were horrific, they did not prevent us from prevailing. There were three significant targets that were not struck, and the omission of the fuel farm, the shipyard and the submarine base had strategic consequence.

Aerial view of the Submarine Base (right center) with the fuel farm at left, looking south on Oct. 13, 1941. Among the 16 fuel tanks in the lower group and 10 tanks in the upper group are two that have been painted to resemble buildings (topmost tank in upper group, and rightmost tank in lower group). Other tanks appear to be painted to look like terrain features. Alongside the wharf in right center are USS Niagara (PG 52) with seven or eight PT boats alongside (nearest to camera), and USS Holland (AS 3) with seven submarines alongside. About six more submarines are at the piers at the head of the Submarine Base peninsula. (Official U.S. Navy photograph/Released)
Aerial view of the Submarine Base (right center) with the fuel farm at left, looking south on Oct. 13, 1941. Among the 16 fuel tanks in the lower group and 10 tanks in the upper group are two that have been painted to resemble buildings (topmost tank in upper group, and rightmost tank in lower group). Other tanks appear to be painted to look like terrain features. Alongside the wharf in right center are USS Niagara (PG 52) with seven or eight PT boats alongside (nearest to camera), and USS Holland (AS 3) with seven submarines alongside. About six more submarines are at the piers at the head of the Submarine Base peninsula. (Official U.S. Navy photograph/Released)

From the Dive Tower, we can see some of the many fuel tanks that supplied the fleet. Adm. Nimitz observed that had these tanks been struck, and their four million barrels of fuel lost, it would have taken two years to replenish our supply such that the fleet could prosecute the war across the vast, vast reaches of the Pacific Ocean.

From here, we can also see the dry docks and the incredible industrial capacity of the Navy’s “No Ka Oi” shipyard, the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard. After the attack, 12 ships including five battleships had been sunk or beached and nine ships including three more battleships had been damaged. Yet within only three months, most of the smaller ships and all three of the damaged battleships were returned to service or refloated, and all of them eventually returned to the fight in the Pacific.

Lastly, Pearl Harbor submarines and the Submarine Base weren’t struck. Within hours of the attack, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Harold Stark ordered, “EXECUTE AGAINST JAPAN UNRESTRICTED AIR AND SUBMARINE WARFARE;” our submarines were the only forces able to immediately begin war patrols. They carried the battle across the Pacific and into Japanese home waters while the fleet was repaired.

Our submariners did their deadly business very well. Although submarines made up only two percent of our entire Navy, they sank 30 percent of all Japanese warships, and 55 percent of all Japanese merchant ships sunk during the war. But submariners also paid the heavy price of the heaviest casualty rate of any American branch of service in the war: 52 submarines were lost, and 3,628 submariners (22% of the force) remain on eternal patrol.

The Pearl Harbor horizon has many memorials containing much history, but this important story of submarine force success and sacrifice is hard to find within the Pearl Harbor narrative already on display. Until now. Today, we begin to share that story – honoring our heroes and educating the public – with a new display located in front of the USS Bowfin Memorial, free and accessible to anyone visiting Pearl Harbor’s iconic landmarks.

PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 6, 2016) Chuck Merkel, executive director of the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park (middle), and Rear Adm. Fredrick "Fritz" Roegge, commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (right), unveil the new submarine exhibit at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park. Dec. 7, 2016, marks the 75th anniversary of the attacks on Pearl Harbor and Oahu. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael H. Lee/Released)
PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 6, 2016) Chuck Merkel, executive director of the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park (middle), and Rear Adm. Fredrick “Fritz” Roegge, commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (right), unveil the new submarine exhibit at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park. Dec. 7, 2016, marks the 75th anniversary of the attacks on Pearl Harbor and Oahu. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael H. Lee/Released)

It’s important to remember though that the history of our submarine force didn’t begin on Dec. 7th, 1941; and the submarine force’s significant contributions to our nation’s security didn’t end in September 1945.   Throughout the hostile peace of the Cold War, our strategic forces proved undetectable and invulnerable to threats, while our attack submarines demonstrated the ability to hold at risk what other nations’ hold most dear. And strategic deterrence and undersea superiority are just as important to our national security today as they have been in the past.

ARABIAN GULF (Jan. 21, 2016) The Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine USS Toledo (SSN 769), assigned to Commander, Task Force (CTF) 54, transits through the Arabian Gulf. (U.S. Navy Combat Camera photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Torrey W. Lee/Released)
ARABIAN GULF (Jan. 21, 2016) The Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine USS Toledo (SSN 769), assigned to Commander, Task Force (CTF) 54, transits through the Arabian Gulf. (U.S. Navy Combat Camera photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Torrey W. Lee/Released)

That makes this an incredibly exciting time to be a submariner, and an incredibly important time for our submarine force to maintain its undersea superiority. Our Navy and our Nation should expect no less. So although the history of our submarine force is impressive and is to be celebrated, that history is not complete. Our history is being made today, and every day, by every one of today’s submariners. Because throughout the 116-year history of the U.S. Submarine Force, the most important factor in all of our many successes and in all of our nation’s conflicts has been the submarine Sailor. It is our submarine Sailors, supported by our families, then as now, that are our greatest asset; our secret sauce; our competitive advantage. They are the envy of every would-be competitor on the high seas – or below them.

So on this Pearl Harbor Day, let us remember the debt we owe to the veterans who preceded us – veterans who have won our Nation’s wars and who have also won the peace. But perhaps their greatest legacy is their example of honor, courage and commitment that is now proudly carried forward and embodied in today’s generation of submarine veterans. This is another greatest generation; one that continues to preserve that hard-won peace. It is their service that should now give us all great confidence that Gen. MacArthur’s words delivered on board USS Missouri in 1945 should prove to be prophetic: “Let us pray that peace be now restored to the world, and that God will preserve it always.”

First panel the new submarine exhibit at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park
First panel the new submarine exhibit at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park
Second panel of the new submarine exhibit at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park
Second panel of the new submarine exhibit at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park
Second panel of the new submarine exhibit at the USS Bowfin Submarine MusThird panel of the new submarine exhibit at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Parkeum and Park
Third panel of the new submarine exhibit at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/12/06/december-7th-1941-a-submarine-force-perspective/ U.S. Navy

#PearlHarbor75: Chief Aviation Ordnanceman John Finn

Chief Aviation Ordnanceman John Finn

The 75th commemoration of the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor and other U.S. military facilities on Oahu is an opportunity for us to honor the courage, service and sacrifice of the U.S. military personnel present during the attacks.

Chief Aviation Ordnanceman John Finn was one of them. While under heavy machine gun fire,  Finn manned a .50-caliber machinegun mounted on an instruction stand in a completely exposed section of the parking ramp. Painfully wounded multiple times, he had to be convinced to leave his post. After receiving first aid treatment, he overcame the severe pain of his injuries and returned to the squadron area to supervise the rearming of returning planes.

In this video, Seaman Brian Spaccarelli, an aviation ordnanceman, of shares how Medal of Honor recipient Chief Finn’s toughness, accountability, integrity and initiative has influenced him to honor the past and inspire the future.

U.S. Navy video by Petty Officer 2nd Class Johans Chavarro

Learn more about the Pearl Harbor attack.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/12/06/pearlharbor75-chief-aviation-ordnanceman-john-finn/ U.S. Navy

#PearlHarbor75: Navy divers and salvage teams

Graphic of Pearl Harbor divers and a Sailor

The 75th commemoration of the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor and other U.S. military facilities on Oahu is an opportunity for us to honor the courage, service and sacrifice of the U.S. military personnel present during the attacks.

Our Navy divers and salvage teams were among them. Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, Navy divers began the most immense dive and salvage operations to date. Throughout 1942 and part of 1943, Navy divers worked on salvaging destroyers, supply ships, and other badly damaged vessels.

The divers faced extraordinary dangers: poisonous gas, unexploded ordnance, as well as the unknown of the destruction that awaited them below. Through the course of the Pearl Harbor effort, Navy divers spent approximately 16,000 hours underwater, during 4,000 dives. Contract civilian divers contributed another 4,000 diving hours.

In this video, Navy diver, Petty Officer Melissa Nguyen-Alarcon, of Winthrop, Maine, shares how their toughness, accountability, integrity and initiative has influenced her.

U.S. Navy video by Petty Officer 2nd Class Johans Chavarro

Learn more about the Pearl Harbor attack.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/12/06/pearlharbor75-navy-divers-and-salvage-teams/ U.S. Navy

#PearlHarbor75: Mess Attendant 2nd Class Doris Miller

Photo of Mess Attendant 2nd Class and Petty Officer 2nd Class Freddie White

The 75th commemoration of the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor and other U.S. military facilities on Oahu is an opportunity for us to honor the courage, service and sacrifice of the U.S. military personnel present during the attacks.

Mess Attendant 2nd Class Doris Miller was one of them. Petty Officer 2nd Class Freddie White shares how Miller’s toughness, accountability, integrity and initiative on Dec. 7, 1941, has influenced him.

U.S. Navy video by Petty Officer 2nd Class Johans Chavarro

Learn more about Miller’s life and his actions that earned him the Navy Cross.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/12/04/pearlharbor75-mess-attendant-2nd-class-doris-miller/ U.S. Navy

75th Commemoration of Pearl Harbor Attacks Special Report

Graphic of a World War II veteran and a U.S. Navy Sailor saluting

The 75th commemoration of the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor and other U.S. military facilities on Oahu is an opportunity for us to honor the courage, service and sacrifice of the U.S. military personnel present during the attacks.

Just like the Sailors attacked on Dec. 7th, 1941, today’s U.S. Navy Sailors embody our four core attributes of toughness, accountability, integrity and initiative.

Continue to follow this blog as we share how our Sailors are honoring the past and inspiring the future.

To learn more about the history of the attack, check out Naval History and Heritage Command’s website and check out its Facebook page. Commemoration resources are also available on its website.

More than 100 WWII Veterans Arrive in Honolulu on Honor Flight
HONOLULU (Dec. 3, 2016) Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Charping, of Charlotte, N.C., assigned to Navy Information Operation Command (NIOC), gets a hug from a World War II veteran arriving at Honolulu International Airport. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Nardel Gervacio/Released)
HONOLULU (Dec. 3, 2016) Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Charping, of Charlotte, N.C., assigned to Navy Information Operation Command (NIOC), gets a hug from a World War II veteran arriving at Honolulu International Airport. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Nardel Gervacio/Released)

Past and present met when Sailors from Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam greeted more than 100 World War II veterans, including Pearl Harbor survivors, when they arrived at the Honolulu International Airport, Dec. 3, for the upcoming 75th Pearl Harbor commemoration events throughout the island of Oahu.

Read more on Navy.mil.

USS John C. Stennis Arrives in Hawaii for 75th Anniversary of Attack on Pearl Harbor and Oahu

USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Dec. 2, to participate in National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day events in Hawaii. Prior to arriving in Hawaii and after its departure, John C. Stennis conducted at-sea training to maintain and build technical and operational proficiency. Ongoing training is essential in ensuring U.S. warships remain capable, adaptive and able to carry out an array of missions around the world.

Read more on Navy.mil.

Sailors Honor Fallen Pearl Harbor Heroes

PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 2, 2016) Petty Officer 2nd Class Kevin Smith, a Navy reservist from Frederick, Maryland, salutes Pearl Harbor survivor Donald Stratton during a ceremony to honor the fallen men of the Pennsylvania-class battleship USS Arizona at National Cemetery of the Pacific at Punchbowl in Honolulu. Stratton was a seaman first class when he escaped the burning wreckage of USS Arizona. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Gabrielle Joyner/Released)
PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 2, 2016) Petty Officer 2nd Class Kevin Smith, a Navy reservist from Frederick, Maryland, salutes Pearl Harbor survivor Donald Stratton during a ceremony to honor the fallen men of the Pennsylvania-class battleship USS Arizona at National Cemetery of the Pacific at Punchbowl in Honolulu. Stratton was a seaman first class when he escaped the burning wreckage of USS Arizona. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Gabrielle Joyner/Released)

During a wreath-laying ceremony at National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific at Punchbowl in Honolulu Dec. 2, USS Arizona survivors were joined by their families, service members and civilians to honor their fallen shipmates lost during the Pearl Harbor attack.

Read more on Navy.mil.

Rain Provides Reflection during Pearl Harbor Survivor Memorial Service

PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 1, 2016) A member of the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Honors and Ceremonial Guard presents Bob Bracci, honorary member of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association, with an ensign during an ash-scattering ceremony at the USS Utah Memorial for Pearl Harbor survivor Jack A. Stoeber. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Gabrielle Joyner/Released)
PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 1, 2016) A member of the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Honors and Ceremonial Guard presents Bob Bracci, honorary member of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association, with an ensign during an ash-scattering ceremony at the USS Utah Memorial for Pearl Harbor survivor Jack A. Stoeber. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Gabrielle Joyner/Released)

Sailors and friends gathered at the USS Utah Memorial for an ash scattering ceremony honoring Pearl Harbor survivor Jack A. Stoeber at Ford Island, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Dec. 1. Stoeber served as a carpenter’s mate and was stationed aboard the Dobbin-class destroyer tender USS Whitney (AD 4) during the attacks. He was supposed to be on leave to visit his uncle that day, but his plans changed and he stayed on the ship.

Read more on Navy.mil.

 

http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2016/12/04/75th-commemoration-of-pearl-harbor-attacks-special-report/ U.S. Navy