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Author Archives: Recent Updates for U.S. Coast Guard Digital Newsroom

US Coast Guard launches new online newsroom

WASHINGTON — The Coast Guard is scheduled to launch its new, online digital newsroom, http://www.news.uscg.mil, Thursday afternoon.

The mobile-friendly content management system replaces the service’s previous news site, www.uscgnews.com, and offers an email subscription service that delivers both regional and national Coast Guard news.

Users can click here to subscribe to the news delivery service. This new capability will allow users to manage their Coast Guard news preferences through the service’s subscription preferences page.

Users currently receiving Coast Guard news via uscgnews.com will continue to receive news releases via email; however, users can opt-out of the emails by clicking the unsubscribe button at the bottom of any Coast Guard email sent from the new system.  

For more information, please contact 202-372-4630.

Update: Coast Guard suspends search for person in water near Anini Beach, Kauai

The Coast Guard suspended the active search at sunset, Wednesday, for a reported person in the water near Anini Beach, Kauai.

“Suspending a search is a difficult decision to make, especially when we aren’t able to bring closure to the family,” said Charles Turner, command duty officer of Coast Guard Sector Honolulu. “Our deepest condolences go out to the family, friends and loved ones effected.”

Responders conducted a total of 25 searches covering 545 square miles over a span of three days.

Involved in the search were:

– MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crews and HC-130 Hercules airplane crews from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point
– Crew of USCGC Kittiwake (WPB 87316)
– Crew from Coast Guard Station Kauai
– Kauai Fire Department helicopter and Jet Ski crews -Ocean Safety personnel on Jet Skis

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu Command Center received a relayed call at 6:48 p.m. Monday from Kauai Fire Department stating the woman had been seen swimming when she reportedly became distressed.

Update: Coast Guard searches for missing diver near Alligator Reef

MIAMI — The Coast Guard is searching Tuesday for a diver who was reported missing near Alligator Reef. 

Missing is Rob Stewart, 37, from Toronto, Canada.

At 5:13 p.m., watch standers with the Sector Key West Command Center received a report of a missing diver near Alligator Reef from a crew member aboard the vessel Pisces. Coast Guard watch standers issued an Urgent Marine Information Broadcast, launched a Station Islamorada 33-foot Law Enforcement Special Purpose Craft boat crew, launched an Air Station Miami MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew and diverted the crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Charles Sexton.

Assisting with the search are members from the Navy, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and Monroe County Sheriff’s Office.

For breaking news follow us on Twitter @USCGSoutheast

Coast Guard, Kauai Fire Department searching for person in water near Anini Beach, Kauai

HONOLULU — The Coast Guard and Kauai Fire Department are searching for a reported person in the water near Anini Beach, Kauai, Tuesday.

Missing is a 21-year-old woman last seen wearing a pink top and white bottoms. She is reportedly visiting from Baltimore.

Anyone with information that may help locate the missing swimmer is asked to contact the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu Command Center at 808-842-2600.

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew and an HC-130 Hercules airplane crew, both from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point, and the crew of USCGC Kittiwake (WPB 87316) are currently searching the area. Kauai Fire Department personnel are searching with personnel aboard jet skis and a helicopter. Ocean Safety personnel are searching with a jet ski.

Watchstanders at Sector Honolulu Command Center received a relayed call at 6:48 p.m. Monday from Kauai Fire Department stating the woman had been seen swimming when she reportedly became distressed. She was last seen yelling for help approximately 300 yards from shore. A friend swam out to assist when he too became distressed and required rescue from a good Samaritan and a Kauai Fire Department personnel aboard a jet ski.

On-scene weather conditions are forecast as winds of 12 mph and 6 foot waves.

Photos and video available: Coast Guard rescues diver who left sinking vessel

 A Coast Guard Station Fort Lauderdale 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew picks up a diver that left a vessel taking on water one mile east of Dania Beach Pier in Florida on Jan. 31, 2017. A Coast Guard Station Fort Lauderdale 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew transfers a diver to emergency medical services at 15th St. Pier in Dania Beach, Florida on Jan. 31, 2017.
A Coast Guard Station Fort Lauderdale 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew picks up a diver that left a vessel taking on water one mile east of Dania Beach Pier in Florida on Jan. 31, 2017.

MIAMI — The Coast Guard rescued a diver Tuesday who left a vessel taking on water one mile east of Dania Beach Pier.

At 12:23 p.m., Coast Guard Station Fort Lauderdale watch standers received notification from Broward County Sheriff’s Office of a vessel in distress near Dania Beach Pier. The watch standers diverted a Station Fort Lauderdale 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew. TowBoatU.S. arrived on scene at 12:34 p.m. and found a 23-foot center console vessel taking on water with three people aboard who reported one person had donned scuba gear and entered the water. The Station Fort Lauderdale boat crew arrived on scene and located the diver.

All four people were transferred to emergency medical services at the 15th St. Pier. No medical concerns were reported.

For breaking news follow us on Twitter @USCGSoutheast

Coast Guard rescues 3 from plane crash in vicinity of the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

Three people walk away after their Cessna 180 crashed near a ridgeline landing strip in the vicinity of the Chakachatna River in the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, Jan. 30, 2017. A Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60T Jayhawk crew transported the three to Anchorage International Airport. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Three people walk away after their Cessna 180 crashed near a ridgeline landing strip in the vicinity of the Chakachatna River in the Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, Jan. 30, 2017. A Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60T Jayhawk crew transported the three to Anchorage International Airport. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Three survivors aboard a downed Cessna 180 take a photo with the Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60T Jayhawk crew who rescued them in the woods of Anchorage, Alaska, Jan. 30, 2017. The three survivors reported no injuries. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Three survivors aboard a downed Cessna 180 take a photo with the Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60T Jayhawk crew who rescued them Jan. 30, 2017. The three survivors reported no injuries. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

JUNEAU, Alaska — A Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew located and rescued three survivors of a plane crash from a ridgeline landing strip in the vicinity of the Chakachatna River, in the Kenai Peninsula Borough, Monday evening.

The Jayhawk crew landed, brought the three survivors aboard and transported them to awaiting emergency medical personnel at Anchorage International Airport. Both passengers and the pilot reported no injuries.

Watchstanders from the 17th Coast Guard District received notification of the crash from the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center with a possible, approximate location of the fixed-wing Cessna at approximately 2 p.m. Monday. Watchstanders were told that the plane had been missing since Sunday afternoon and immediately directed the launch of the Jayhawk crew.

Within an hour, the Jayhawk crew arrived to the assumed position and were able to hear the planes Emergency Locator Transmitter over 1215 megahertz radio. The Jayhawk crew used direction-finding equipment and, when in range, saw a flare shot by the pilot of the plane.

“This rescue was possible because of the joint effort put forth between the Coast Guard and Alaska Rescue Coordination Center and because the pilot was prepared with the necessary safety equipment,” said Lt. Joseph Plunkett, pilot aboard the Jayhawk rescue helicopter. “I can’t put enough emphasis on how crucial it is to have safety equipment whenever transiting through Alaska. Alaska is full of remote and often dangerous areas, and in this case, because the pilot was prepared, we were able to rescue the three people and bring them back to their family.”

 

Coast Guard rescues three near Shelter Island

SAN DIEGO — The Coast Guard rescued three boaters from the water near Shelter Island, in San Diego, Monday.

At approximately 1:45 p.m., Monday, a Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Team (MSST) 91109 33-foot Special Purpose Craft – Law Enforcement boat crew came upon three people in the water who had been involved in a personal watercraft collision, and had been in the water for approximately 30 minutes.

All three people were pulled aboard the MSST’s vessel, and one PWC was towed to Harbor Island, in San Diego. The second watercraft was overturned and the owner would attempt recovery.

The overturned PWC was found to have a crack in the hull and the owner was unable to re-right or tow it. The MSST crew placed the PWC into side tow and used a dewatering pump to keep the craft afloat until it was also brought to Harbor Island.

There were no reported injuries, and all three survivors were transported to Harbor Island at approximately 3 p.m.

There was no reported pollution.

Imagery available: Coast Guard seeking public’s help locating owner of kayak found near Maunalua Bay, Oahu

This blue tandem kayak, labeled Cobra Tandem, was found unmanned and adrift in Maunalua Bay, Oahu, Jan. 29, 2017.  This blue tandem kayak, labeled Cobra Tandem, was found unmanned and adrift in Maunalua Bay, Oahu, Jan. 29, 2017.

Courtesy photos.

HONOLULU — The Coast Guard is seeking the public’s help identifying the owner of an unmanned, adrift kayak found in Maunalua Bay, Oahu, Sunday.

The blue tandem kayak, labeled Cobra Tandem, was found approximately one mile offshore Aina Haina. 

Anyone with information that may help identify the owner of the kayak is asked to contact the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu Command Center at 808-842-2600.

Watchstanders at Sector Honolulu Command Center received notification from a good Samaritan stating they found the kayak unmanned and adrift at approximately 1130 a.m. today. 

There are currently no reported signs of distress or missing persons in the area.

Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point launched an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew to search for possible people in the water.

“The Coast Guard strongly encourages owners to label their gear with a name and contact information. Also, if the gear is lost, report it to the Coast Guard with a good description so that we can eliminate any unnecessary searches,” said Charles Turner, command duty officer, Sector Honolulu command center.

The Coast Guard offers free “If Found” decals to be placed in a visible location on human-powered watercraft through the Operation Paddle Smart program. The information on the sticker allows response entities to quickly identify the vessel’s owner and aid search and rescue planners in determining the best course of action.

The stickers can be obtained for free at local harbormasters, through the Coast Guard Auxiliary, from Honolulu Sail and Power Squadron offices and at select marine retail and supply stores.

Feature Release: What’s the frequency, Shuey?

Petty Officer 1st Class William Shuey works at Coast Guard Station Washington, D.C., to support radio communication during the 2017 Presidential Inauguration. As the Coast Guard’s assistant communications leader during the inauguration, he kept the seagoing service in direct contact with other federal, state and local agencies throughout the event.(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn)

by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn

“Have you seen Shuey?” “Somebody call Shuey.” “Better check with Shuey!” An hour in the downtown Portsmouth, Virginia, Federal Building rarely passes without someone seeking him out. As scores of Coast Guard leaders in the office building plan and prepare their people for missions in the Mid-Atlantic region and beyond, the toils of Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class William Shuey Jr., is like a network of welds running through their ship, holding everything together.

“Petty Officer Shuey is an unsung hero,” said Capt. Gregory Sanial, chief of staff, 5th Coast Guard District. “Without his positive attitude and technical expertise, our network of phones and computers would come to a grinding halt.”

Shuey recently upgraded a bulk of the building’s computers, increasing speed and efficiency and ensuring Windows 10 compliancy. His most recent mission to Washington, D.C., supported the Coast Guard’s role in protecting the capital January 13-20, during the presidential inauguration. As the Coast Guard’s assistant communications leader during the inauguration, he kept the seagoing service in direct contact with the plethora of federal, state and local agencies throughout the event. He ensured radios were loaded with the correct software in order to function properly. His radio expertise kept Coast Guard helicopter and boat crews in touch with emergency response and security agencies in the air, on the ground and on the water. He traveled site to site before, during, and after inauguration day, to troubleshoot and resolve the technical troubles that arose within the complex web of radio communication.

“The success of the mission on the water relied on the patrol commander’s ability to communicate with vessels spanning 17 nautical miles with more than ten agencies on a single secure frequency,” said Lt. Brian Miller, commanding officer, Station Washington, D.C. “While Shuey was here during the inauguration he not only kept the communications for the operation up and running, but he also took a look at our existing infrastructure and is scheduled to return in a few weeks to look at upgrading our existing communications network. With his help, we hope to improve our communications with all of our National Capital Region partners year round.”

Petty Officer 1st Class William Shuey works at Coast Guard Station Washington, D.C., to support radio communication during the 2017 Presidential Inauguration. As the Coast Guard’s assistant communications leader during the inauguration, he kept the seagoing service in direct contact with other federal, state and local agencies throughout the event.(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn)

Agencies typically use different types of radios that require different software. Getting Coast Guard radios to talk and listen to radios of multiple agencies is an elaborate affair, but Shuey isn’t new to the endeavor. During Pope Francis’s visit to Philadelphia in September 2015, he kept the Coast Guard on stable and interoperable frequencies with the U.S. Secret Service, FBI, and the Pennsylvania National Guard, among others.

As the son and grandson of former Coast Guardsmen, Shuey’s interest in serving began as a small child.

His father, William Shuey Sr., initially served as a Coast Guardsman in the Vietnam War aboard Coast Guard Cutter Ingham, before becoming a storekeeper, specializing in Coast Guard finances and logistics. He was honorably discharged and went to work in the private sector as an accountant.

Shuey Jr.’s grandfather, Herb Shuey, was a radioman in the Coast Guard and served for 27 years before retiring as a Chief Warrant Officer in command of Coast Guard Radio Station Chicago.

Growing up in Danville, Illinois, Shuey followed more in his grandfather’s footsteps than his father’s.

“My grandfather got me interested in radios and doing this type of work in the Coast Guard,” said Shuey. “When Radio Station Chicago closed down for good, my grandfather still had access to a lot of the old defunct gear, no longer being used. As a child, I got to play with this radio equipment and my grandfather taught me not only how to use it, but how to modify it so it could continue to be used. My grandfather helped to pioneer Coast Guard communications. Coast Guard communicators were so exceptional that during World War II, the Navy used Coast Guard communicators, placing them in Greenland and Venezuela, to intercept enemy messages. High frequency radio was used for long-range communication before satellite communication was available.”

Shuey’s passion for radios extends into his personal life. A dedicated ham radio enthusiast, he’s currently studying for his license as an amateur extra class radio operator, reading up on electronic theory, radio propagation theory and the legal aspects of amateur radio communication.

“I encourage everyone to explore ham radio,” said Shuey. “After the tsunamis struck Japan in March 2011, nobody impacted by the disasters was able to communicate using traditional means. Cell phone towers were wiped out. Landline connections went dead. Japanese amateur radio operators were the critical communication link both within the country and to the outside world.”

Shuey’s favorite ham radio activity involves what is known to hams as chasing the DX – the hobby of making two-way radio contact with distant stations.

“I have a 32-foot vertical antenna in my backyard, and my goal is to talk to as many people outside the U.S. as I can using ham radio,” said Shuey. “I’ve talked to people in Ireland, Kuwait, Japan and Australia, among other places.”

Shuey’s amateur radio expertise helped him solve a problem that impacted the entire Coast Guard. He recognized an inadequate antenna was being used at an incident command post, resulting in poor radio communications. He conducted research and tested alternatives, noting the antenna was in need of a ground plane to direct radio waves properly. His solution was shared Coast Guard-wide.

A former telecommunications specialist, Shuey became an operations specialist when the Coast Guard changed its occupational specialties and titles in 2003. He’s currently a member of the Coast Guard 5th District’s Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Information Technology Division (C4IT).

“I love communication technology and I love the Coast Guard,” said Shuey. “Anyone interested in doing what I currently do in this service should become an information technician or an electronics technician. I don’t recommend becoming an operations specialist if you want to do the work I’m currently doing.”

Shuey said the Coast Guard offers opportunities for almost anyone willing to learn, regardless of their career interests.

“My grandfather told me a long time ago, if you want to join a military service, you can choose one that might have you take lives for your country, or you can choose the one that helps save them. I chose the service where we are most often lucky enough to be able to help save lives, and I’ve had fun doing so.”

Though his technical expertise qualifies him to face the wide array of issues he’s asked to tackle on a daily basis, Shuey’s enthusiasm for the job and his passion for helping people is likely why others continue to seek him out.

“He’s independent, self-motivated, responsible and genuinely enjoys his job,” said Senior Chief Petty Officer Matthew Doscher, Shuey’s supervisor. “His positive and encouraging attitude partnered with his in-depth technical expertise result in the high demand for his contributions in the Coast Guard.”

Though he’s eager to assist, anyone looking for Shuey best get in line.

Feature Release: What’s the frequency, Shuey?

Petty Officer 1st Class William Shuey works at Coast Guard Station Washington, D.C., to support radio communication during the 2017 Presidential Inauguration. As the Coast Guard’s assistant communications leader during the inauguration, he kept the seagoing service in direct contact with other federal, state and local agencies throughout the event.(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn)

by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn

“Have you seen Shuey?” “Somebody call Shuey.” “Better check with Shuey!” An hour in the downtown Portsmouth, Virginia, Federal Building rarely passes without someone seeking him out. As scores of Coast Guard leaders in the office building plan and prepare their people for missions in the Mid-Atlantic region and beyond, the toils of Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class William Shuey Jr., is like a network of welds running through their ship, holding everything together.

“Petty Officer Shuey is an unsung hero,” said Capt. Gregory Sanial, chief of staff, 5th Coast Guard District. “Without his positive attitude and technical expertise, our network of phones and computers would come to a grinding halt.”

Shuey recently upgraded a bulk of the building’s computers, increasing speed and efficiency and ensuring Windows 10 compliancy. His most recent mission to Washington, D.C., supported the Coast Guard’s role in protecting the capital January 13-20, during the presidential inauguration. As the Coast Guard’s assistant communications leader during the inauguration, he kept the seagoing service in direct contact with the plethora of federal, state and local agencies throughout the event. He ensured radios were loaded with the correct software in order to function properly. His radio expertise kept Coast Guard helicopter and boat crews in touch with emergency response and security agencies in the air, on the ground and on the water. He traveled site to site before, during, and after inauguration day, to troubleshoot and resolve the technical troubles that arose within the complex web of radio communication.

“The success of the mission on the water relied on the patrol commander’s ability to communicate with vessels spanning 17 nautical miles with more than ten agencies on a single secure frequency,” said Lt. Brian Miller, commanding officer, Station Washington, D.C. “While Shuey was here during the inauguration he not only kept the communications for the operation up and running, but he also took a look at our existing infrastructure and is scheduled to return in a few weeks to look at upgrading our existing communications network. With his help, we hope to improve our communications with all of our National Capital Region partners year round.”

Petty Officer 1st Class William Shuey works at Coast Guard Station Washington, D.C., to support radio communication during the 2017 Presidential Inauguration. As the Coast Guard’s assistant communications leader during the inauguration, he kept the seagoing service in direct contact with other federal, state and local agencies throughout the event.(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn)

Agencies typically use different types of radios that require different software. Getting Coast Guard radios to talk and listen to radios of multiple agencies is an elaborate affair, but Shuey isn’t new to the endeavor. During Pope Francis’s visit to Philadelphia in September 2015, he kept the Coast Guard on stable and interoperable frequencies with the U.S. Secret Service, FBI, and the Pennsylvania National Guard, among others.

As the son and grandson of former Coast Guardsmen, Shuey’s interest in serving began as a small child.

His father, William Shuey Sr., initially served as a Coast Guardsman in the Vietnam War aboard Coast Guard Cutter Ingham, before becoming a storekeeper, specializing in Coast Guard finances and logistics. He was honorably discharged and went to work in the private sector as an accountant.

Shuey Jr.’s grandfather, Herb Shuey, was a radioman in the Coast Guard and served for 27 years before retiring as a Chief Warrant Officer in command of Coast Guard Radio Station Chicago.

Growing up in Danville, Illinois, Shuey followed more in his grandfather’s footsteps than his father’s.

“My grandfather got me interested in radios and doing this type of work in the Coast Guard,” said Shuey. “When Radio Station Chicago closed down for good, my grandfather still had access to a lot of the old defunct gear, no longer being used. As a child, I got to play with this radio equipment and my grandfather taught me not only how to use it, but how to modify it so it could continue to be used. My grandfather helped to pioneer Coast Guard communications. Coast Guard communicators were so exceptional that during World War II, the Navy used Coast Guard communicators, placing them in Greenland and Venezuela, to intercept enemy messages. High frequency radio was used for long-range communication before satellite communication was available.”

Shuey’s passion for radios extends into his personal life. A dedicated ham radio enthusiast, he’s currently studying for his license as an amateur extra class radio operator, reading up on electronic theory, radio propagation theory and the legal aspects of amateur radio communication.

“I encourage everyone to explore ham radio,” said Shuey. “After the tsunamis struck Japan in March 2011, nobody impacted by the disasters was able to communicate using traditional means. Cell phone towers were wiped out. Landline connections went dead. Japanese amateur radio operators were the critical communication link both within the country and to the outside world.”

Shuey’s favorite ham radio activity involves what is known to hams as chasing the DX – the hobby of making two-way radio contact with distant stations.

“I have a 32-foot vertical antenna in my backyard, and my goal is to talk to as many people outside the U.S. as I can using ham radio,” said Shuey. “I’ve talked to people in Ireland, Kuwait, Japan and Australia, among other places.”

Shuey’s amateur radio expertise helped him solve a problem that impacted the entire Coast Guard. He recognized an inadequate antenna was being used at an incident command post, resulting in poor radio communications. He conducted research and tested alternatives, noting the antenna was in need of a ground plane to direct radio waves properly. His solution was shared Coast Guard-wide.

A former telecommunications specialist, Shuey became an operations specialist when the Coast Guard changed its occupational specialties and titles in 2003. He’s currently a member of the Coast Guard 5th District’s Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Information Technology Division (C4IT).

“I love communication technology and I love the Coast Guard,” said Shuey. “Anyone interested in doing what I currently do in this service should become an information technician or an electronics technician. I don’t recommend becoming an operations specialist if you want to do the work I’m currently doing.”

Shuey said the Coast Guard offers opportunities for almost anyone willing to learn, regardless of their career interests.

“My grandfather told me a long time ago, if you want to join a military service, you can choose one that might have you take lives for your country, or you can choose the one that helps save them. I chose the service where we are most often lucky enough to be able to help save lives, and I’ve had fun doing so.”

Though his technical expertise qualifies him to face the wide array of issues he’s asked to tackle on a daily basis, Shuey’s enthusiasm for the job and his passion for helping people is likely why others continue to seek him out.

“He’s independent, self-motivated, responsible and genuinely enjoys his job,” said Senior Chief Petty Officer Matthew Doscher, Shuey’s supervisor. “His positive and encouraging attitude partnered with his in-depth technical expertise result in the high demand for his contributions in the Coast Guard.”

Though he’s eager to assist, anyone looking for Shuey best get in line.